Top Search

Utility Container

Main Container

School District of Janesville Handbooks

ADA Compliant Handbooks

Academic & Career Planning Guide 2019-2020

Academic & Career Planning Guide 2019-2020

Print Book Here

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF JANESVILLE

Educational Services Center   

527 S. Franklin Street, Janesville, WI  53548 ~ Phone:  (608) 743‐5000 ~  Fax:  (608) 743‐7491

Craig High School

401 S. Randall Avenue - Janesville, WI  53545

Phone: (608) 743‐5200 ~ Attendance: (608) 743‐5230 ~ Fax: (608) 743‐5150

ADMINISTRATION

Principal Dr. Alison Bjoin (608) 743‐5205
Principal’s Secretary Tricia Jones (608) 743‐5210
Assistant Principal Shawn Kane (608) 743‐5260
Assistant Principal Monte Phillips (608) 743‐5270
Dean of Students Nick Tillema (608) 743-5221
Asst Principal Secretary Judy Crook (608) 743-5262
Asst Principal/Athletics Secretary Mary Adamson (608) 743-5266

STUDENT SERVICES

A–Dis Counselor Shelly Osmond (608) 743-5253
Doa-J Counselor Sara Lehman (608) 743-5257
J-Mow Counselor Jon Watson (608) 743-5222
Mue-Ray Counselor Karl Bryan (608) 743-5255
Re-Sha Counselor Emily Victor (608) 743-5365
She–Z Student Services Specialist Sherri Rudkin (608) 743-5267
Student Services Secretary Mary Severin (608) 743-5251
Registrar Betsy Nelson (608) 743-5252
School Psychologist Michelle Costello (608) 743-5323
School Social Worker Rebecca Boylan (608) 743-5237

 

Parker High School

3125 Mineral Point Avenue - Janesville, WI 53548

 Phone: (608) 743-5600 ~ Attendance: (608) 743-5630 ~ Fax: (608) 743-5550

ADMINISTRATION

Principal Christopher Laue (608) 743‐5605
Principal’s Secretary Rita Kettleson (608) 743-5610
Assistant Principal Jolene Terrones (608) 743-5680
Assistant Principal Quiana Polk (608) 743-5660
Dean of Students Brian Martin (608) 743-5502
Asst Principal Secretary Connie Stratton (608) 743-5665
Asst Principal/Athletics Secretary Kari Cinto (608) 743-5641

 

STUDENT SERVICES

A–E Student Services Specialist Sara Ofner (608) 743-5722
F–K Counselor Mary Ross (608) 743-5656
L–R Counselor Denise Kruser (608) 743-5657
S–Z Student Services Specialist Jen Leneau (608) 743-5655
Student Services Secretary / Registrar Diane Schroeder (608) 743-5651
School Psychologist Nick Paniagua (608) 743-5659
Student Services Secretary Mary Severin (608) 743-5251
School Social Worker Hayley Wilson (608) 743-5668

 

CHARTER SCHOOLS

There are a number of charter school offerings within the School District of Janesville. If you and/or your child are interested in a charter school, please contact the following:

ARISE Virtual Academy
Principal Dr. David Parr - 743-6139

For inquiries and/or questions, please contact: Dr. David Parr – 743-6139

Apply Here

 

TAGOS Leadership Academy,
Principal Patty Hernandez – 743-5059

For inquiries and/or questions, please contact: Stephanie Davis, Dean of Students – 289-0293

Apply Here

Rock River Charter School 
Principal Dr. Lisa Peterson –752-8273

For inquiries and/or questions, please contact: Dr. Lisa Peterson – 752-8273

Apply Here

Rock University
Principal Dr. Kolleen Onsrud – 743-5037

For inquiries and/or questions, please contact: Angela Kerr, Dean of Students – 743-7427 

Apply Here

 

CAREER PLANNING AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSE SELECTION HANDBOOK TABLE OF CONTENTS

Important Planning Information The 16 Career Clusters Computer Science Physical Education
Advanced Placement New Courses English Science
Project Lead the Way   Four-Year Plan Worksheet Family and Consumer Sciences Social Studies
Work-Based Learning Experiences Interdisciplinary Studies Agriculture and Natural Resources Health Technology and Engineering Education
Global Education Achievement Certification Art Mathematics World Languages
Academic and Career Planning: Overview Business and Marketing Music Youth Apprenticeship / Mentorship / Professional Internship/Elevate

 

IMPORTANT PLANNING INFORMATION

As you begin course selection for the upcoming year, it is essential to remember that this is a portion of your long-range high school plan.

Future coursework, postsecondary education, and career goals are impacted by the choices that you make in course selection. If after reading this document you still have questions about the process, please contact the Student Services Office at your student’s high school. Staff will assist you in answering questions. The Parker Student Services Office may be reached at 743-5651; the Craig Student Services Office may be reached at 743-5251.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Students must earn 26.5 credits. A course that meets four days per week for one semester is awarded 0.5 of a credit. A STUDENT MUST CARRY SEVEN FULL-TIME COURSES. Each student must earn credits in the following required courses:

Curricular Area Credits Required Class of 2020 & 2021 Credits Required Class of 2022 and beyond
English 4.0 4.0
Mathematics 3.0 3.0
Social Studies** 3.0 3.0
Science (See courses below)

1.0 Physical

1.0 Bio/Life

1.0 Additional Science Credit

1.0 Physical

1.0 Bio/Life

1.0 Additional Science Credit

Physical Education 1.5 1.5
Freshman Seminar 0.5 0.5
Health Applications N/A 0.5
Personal Finance 0.5 0.5
Additional Credit in: English, Math, Science, or Social Studies 1.0 N/A
Total Required Credits*** 16.5 16.5
Total Elective Credits 10.0 10.5
Total Credits Required for Graduation 26.5 26.5

*For the graduating classes of 2020 & 2021, one semester of Health is required for high school graduation; this requirement may be earned by having completed one semester in 7th or 8th grade or be taken in high school. Beginning with the graduating classes of 2022, 0.5 credits in Health Applications is required for high school graduation.

**1.0 credit must be US History or AP American History

***Students must meet Civics Test requirements

Physical Science Bio / Life Science 
AP Chemistry Physics             Anatomy & Physiology Forensic Science
AP Physics Physical Science   Animal Science (ES) Genetics
Chemistry Pre-AP Chemistry   AP Biology Microbiology
Earth Science Principals of Engineering (ES)   AP Environmental Science Plant Science (ES)
Aerospace Engineering     Human Body Systems Biology
      Principals of Biomedical Science Intro to Veterinary Science (ES)

ADDITIONAL CREDITS

A. The maximum number of credits which apply to rank point total can be no more than 8.0 per year.

B. Students may earn credit through summer school. No rank points will be awarded for these courses.

C. If a student would like to take an off-campus, correspondence, or study/travel programs, all credits must be pre-approved with a maximum allowance of 3.0 credits. More than 3.0 credits may be pre-approved as part of the Early College Credit Program or Start College Now, which allow high school students to take college/technical school courses for credit. See your counselor or Student Services Specialist for further information about this program. Pre-Approval for Credits Over 8 Courses.docx 

D. Students taking courses over the summer through the Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth (WCATY) or Northwestern’s Center for Talent Development (CTD) or an online source must follow a Pre-Approval Process. The organization offering the course provides verification of credit earned. Pre-approval forms are available from the Student Services Office and must be considered along with your registration with WCATY, CTD, or any other organization. These courses will not be included in scholarship tie breakers. Questions can be referred to Amy Sheridan, 743-5035. Pre-Approval for Credits Over Summer.docx

EARLY GRADUATION

Students desiring early graduation from high school must complete all required courses and enough electives to equal or surpass the minimum number of credits required for graduation by the anticipated date of early graduation. Students must also have written approval of their parent or guardian and have completed a minimum of six semesters of high school work. Students must apply at least one semester before the planned date for early graduation. They must consult with their counselor or Student Services Specialist and principal prior to submitting an application. (Board Policy 6310.2)

STUDY HALLS

All students must be in study hall when not scheduled into a regular class. No credit is earned. Students may schedule a maximum of one study hall each semester.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) AND HONORS (HR) COURSES

Advanced Placement and Honors courses are available in all academic areas. The School District of Janesville offers the Advanced Placement (AP) Program for students who want to be academically challenged. The AP Program is a cooperative educational endeavor between high schools and colleges which offers the potential to earn college credit for college-level courses taken while in high school when students receive a particular score on the AP exam.

ADVANTAGES OF PURSUING AP AND HONORS COURSES

  • Provides rigorous academic experience • Better prepares students for post-secondary course work
  • Increases competitive edge in gaining entrance into selective colleges
  • Potential to earn college credit or placement in advanced courses
  • Enhances academic preparation for college entrance exams (ACT/SAT)
  • Allows students to pursue academic/career interests in more depth

Advanced Placement Courses

AP 2-D Design Portfolio AP Drawing AP Physics II
AP 3-D Design Portfolio AP English Language and Composition AS AP Psychology
AP Biology AP English Literature and Composition AP Spanish
AP Calculus AB AP Environmental Science AP Statistics
AP Calculus BC AP European History AP United States History
AP Chemistry AP French AP US Government Politics
AP Chinese AP Human Geography AP World History: Modern
AP Computer Science A – JAVA AP Music Theory AP Computer Science Principles
AP Physics I    
 
 

HONORS COURSES

Accelerated A Cappella – Honors Chinese V – Honors Accelerated Math II Honors
Accelerated English 9-10 – Honors English 9 – Honors Integrated Math III – Honors
Accelerated Orchestra – Honors English 10 – Honors Pre-Calculus – Honors
Accelerated Wind Ensemble - Honors English 11 – Honors Spanish for Heritage Speakers I – Honors
AS Assistant Child Care Teacher - Honors French IV – Honors Spanish for Heritage Speakers II – Honors
Biology – Honors French V – Honors Spanish IV – Honors
Chemistry Pre-AP Global Studies – Honors Spanish V - Honors
Chinese IV – Honors Integrated Math I – Honors  

 

TRANSCRIPTED CREDIT (TC)

Transcripted Credit agreements allow high school students the opportunity to take actual BTC courses at their local high schools. Classes offered for Transcripted Credit are free of charge to the student and are taught by high school teachers who are certified by the Wisconsin Technical College System. Upon successful completion of the class (students must receive a “C” grade or better); students receive an official BTC transcript that is recognized by many technical colleges in the state of Wisconsin. Classes for Transcripted Credit vary by high school so check with your school counselor or Student Services Specialist to find out what classes are available to you. Please look for the BTC symbol, which identifies specific courses which may be granted Technical College Credit. Courses are subject to change at the start of the school year based on staffing.

BLACKHAWK TECHNICAL COLLEGE TRANSCRIPTED COURSES

TC Anatomy and Physiology – Year TC Chemistry Pre-AP TC Microbiology – Year
TC Animal Science ES TC Forensic Science TC Physics
TC AP Physics I TC Marketing Education II – Management, Market Research, Digital Marketing TC Plant Science ES
TC Chemistry TC AP Statistics  

 

ADVANCED STANDING (AS) CREDIT

Advanced Standing courses are equivalent to a BTC course and are taught by high school teachers. Classes offered for Advanced Standing credit are free of charge to the student and are taught in the local high school. Students who receive a "B" or better are awarded technical college credit only when they enroll in a program at BTC. Advanced Standing classes vary by high school so check with your school counselor to find out what classes are offered to you at your school. Please look for the BTC symbol, which identifies specific courses which may be granted Technical College Credit.

ADVANCED STANDING COURSES

AS Accounting I AS College Mathematics AS Machine Metals
AS Accounting II AS Culinary Arts I AS Oral Communication
AS Advanced Automotive AS Culinary Arts II AS Psychology
AS AP Psychology AS Culinary Arts III ProStart AS Sociology
AS Aspiring Educators AS Economics AS Math 4 the Trades
AS Assistant Child Care Teacher AS Exploring Business/Marketing AS Medical Terminology
AS Automotive Processes AS Introductory Statistics AS Welding
AS Child Development AS Written Communicaton  

EQUIVALENT COURSE CREDIT

High School equivalent courses are those that have been determined to meet specific criteria through an approved equivalent graduation policy. An “equivalent graduation policy” is defined in Chapter PI 18.02(5) as “A board policy which meets the credit requirements specified for each subject area (§118.33 Wis. Stats.), but which permits selected equivalent courses as long as such courses contain the time allotment and substantially the same objectives to develop the knowledge, concepts, and skills of the course for which an equivalent is proposed.” A student can earn up to one equivalent math (EM) credit towards the math requirement for graduation and up to one equivalent science (ES) credit toward the requirement for graduation. All equivalent courses will have a specific designation. See the list below. This designation will be listed next to the course title on the student transcript. (ES) = equivalent for science (EM) = equivalent for mathematics. For example, a veterinary science course taught by an agriculture instructor for a science equivalent credit would be listed on the student’s transcript as Veterinary Science (ES)

 

Equivalent Courses

Equivalent Science:   Equivalent Math:
TC Animal Science (ES)   AP Computer Science Principles (EM)
Intro to Veterinary Science (ES)   AP Computer Science A – JAVA (EM)
TC Plant Science (ES)   Computer Programming II (EM)
Aerospace Engineering (ES)   Computer Programming I (EM) Digital
Principles of Engineering (ES)   Electronics (EM)
    TC Advanced Computer Science AB - JAVA (EM)

For more specific information regarding preparation entrance requirements for a specific program, contact your counselor or Student Services Specialist and/or Blackhawk Technical College.

 

PIE-PARTNERS IN EDUCATION

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Partners in Education (PIE) has partnered with the School District of Janesville as a way to deliver additional rigorous curriculum and dual high school/college credit options to students in a familiar high school environment. Students will be responsible for paying for the tuition, which is about one third of the cost as an undergraduate (approximately $300). PIE courses are college courses, where earning a grade of 'C' or better enable a student to earn college credits that appear on an official UW-Whitewater transcript. Juniors and seniors now meet at least one of the following requirements can enroll in PIE:

• Class rank in the top 25%

• A GPA of at least 3.25 on a 4.0 scale.

• An ACT score of 24 and a class ranking in the top 50%.

• Students who qualify for PIE fill out the PIE online application form, and once they are accepted, can enroll as UWWhitewater students for the PIE courses offered within this catalog.

UW WHITEWATER TRANSCRIPTED COURSES

TC Articulated Genetics TC Advanced Computer Science AB - JAVA

 

SITE SPECIFIED OR DISTANCE LEARNING CLASSES

The School District of Janesville sometimes offers a course as a site specific course or via Telepresence technology. When enrollment does not reach the minimum Board of Education requirement to offer a class at each high school, consideration is given to offer the course at Craig or at Parker only, or via Telepresence technology. A Telepresence classroom uses technology to link to multiple sites and allows one teacher to conduct a class in multiple buildings simultaneously and minimizes student travel.

If a course is only offered as a site specific course, they will be scheduled to allow students time to travel. Start times may be changed to accommodate transportation needs or special circumstances. Parents are responsible for providing transportation if a course is site specific.

Counselors/Student Services Specialists will notify parents and students who are affected by the site specific option after the Board of Education approves staffing. If the enrollment drops below Board of Education requirements after students and parents have been notified of the site specific status, the course may be dropped.

The District CANNOT guarantee the availability of courses that are at the end of a sequence. Enrollment in end of sequence courses must meet district guidelines.

EARLY COLLEGE CREDIT PROGRAM and START COLLEGE NOW

The Wisconsin Start College Now Program, formerly Youth Options, allows public high school juniors and seniors who meet certain requirements to take postsecondary courses at Blackhawk Technical College. Approved courses count toward high school graduation and college credit. Applications are due on October 1st for the spring semester and March 1st for the fall semester.

The Wisconsin Early College Credit Program, formerly Course Options, allows public high school students who meet certain requirements to take post-secondary courses at a Wisconsin public college or a Wisconsin private college. Approved courses count toward high school graduation and college credit. Applications are due on October 1st for the spring semester and March 1st for the fall semester.

SCHOLARSHIP TIES WISCONSIN ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE SCHOLARSHIP/TIE BREAKERS

The State of Wisconsin awards an Academic Excellence Scholarship to each high school’s top students, if they attend a Wisconsin state public or private college, or a technical college. Craig and Parker High Schools determine the recipients of these scholarships based on cumulative grade point average (GPA) earned through the first semester of the senior year to comply with state statutes. In the event of a GPA tie the following criteria will be used:

1. Total number of AP courses

2. Total number of honors courses

3. Composite ACT score

4. If a fourth tie breaker is needed a random selection process, established by the District Administrator/Designee will be considered.

THE WISCONSIN TECHNICAL EXCELLENCE SCHOLARSHIP (TES)

Technical Excellence Scholarships (TES) are to be awarded by the State of Wisconsin to Wisconsin high school seniors who have the highest demonstrated level of proficiency in technical education subjects. The scholarships are only for use at a school within the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) located within the state. The value of the scholarship is up to $2,250 per year, to be applied towards tuition. Students wishing to be considered for the TES need to met eligibility criteria set by the Wisconsin Higher Educational Aids Board (HEAB) and will need to be nominated by their school. (Interested students should pick up the Request for Consideration from their student services office and return it to the student services office at their respective schools no later than January 15, 2018.)

More information can be found on HEAB’s website, at www.heab.wisconsin.gov 

CLASS RANKING/RANK POINTS/GRADING SYSTEM (Class of 2020 only)

Grading Scale

GRADE RANGE RANKING POINTS PER CREDIT
A 92-100 4.00
A- 90-91 3.67
B+ 88-89 3.33
B 82-87 3.00
B- 80-81 2.67
C+ 78-79 2.33
C 72-77 2.00
C- 70-71 1.67
D+ 68-69 1.33
D 62-67 1.00
D- 60-61 0.67
F 50-59 0

Rank points are earned each semester

  • Students will be ranked by total number of rank points earned
  • A cumulative rank will be reported at the end of each semester
  • The rank to determine scholarships and class recognition is determined at the end of the 1st semester of the senior year

HONOR ROLL

  • 3.0 – 3.49 Honors
  • 3.5 – 3.74 High Honors
  • 3.75 – 4.00 Academic Excellence

Honor Roll is determined at the end of each semester and is not the cumulative GPA.

BEGINNING WITH THE CLASS OF 2021

In May, 2018, Janesville’s Board of Education approved a laude system to recognize student achievement at graduation. The recognition is based on attainment of a predetermined GPA:

*** Cumulative GPA 4.00 - 3.75  = Summa Cum Laude (With high honor)

** Cumulative GPA 3.74 - 3.50 =  Magna Cum Laude (With great honor)

* Cumulative GPA 3.49 - 3.25  = Cum Laude (With honor)

The graduating class of 2020 will remain on the current ranking system, while the graduating classes of 2021 and beyond will switch to the laude system.

SCHEDULE CHANGES

Students and their parents are asked to carefully and thoughtfully plan the student’s schedule each year. If students realistically consider their abilities, interests, and goals in choosing their courses, it should not be necessary to make schedule changes. Careful planning and good decision making will keep schedule changes to a minimum. Reasons for a schedule change (during the first 3-weeks of a semester) include:

1. Teacher/counselor/administrator recommendation for a change based on ability of student

2. Ineligibility to take the course

3. Schedule changes will not be made because of a job or athletics during either first or second semester.

4. All students will be scheduled for periods one through eight.

5. STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO KEEP ALL PERIODS AND TEACHERS AS ASSIGNED.

COURSE DROPS

1. A student who drops a course in weeks 4 – 12 of a semester for a study hall will receive no grade recorded for that course. A student who drops a course after week 12 of a semester will receive a semester grade of “F” for that course.

2. If the student is carrying 8.0 credits, they may drop one course for a study hall.

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

All University of Wisconsin System institutions require a minimum of 17.0 high school credits. Thirteen of the seventeen credits are distributed as follows:

I. Core College Preparatory Credits 17.0 credits

English 4.0 Credits

Social Science 3.0 Credits

Electives 4.0 Credits

Mathematics 3.0 Credits

Natural Science 3.0 Credits

Some University of Wisconsin schools recommend exceeding the minimum core college preparatory courses for admissions.

II. Elective Credits

Elective credits may be chosen from the above core college preparatory areas, world language*, fine arts, computer science and other academic areas. Some UW System institutions may also accept vocational courses for some of these 4.0 elective credits.

Each institution may specify additional credit requirements for the remaining 4.0 credits and may specify required content for all 17.0 credits. Please consult your high school counselor or check the college catalogue, or consult the college’s website.

The ACT or SAT college entrance exam must be taken in the spring of the junior year. Institutions in the UW System may have different class rank requirements for admission. These class rank requirements are subject to change at any time. Admission is determined by the class rank at the end of the junior year. Check with your counselor or college admissions office for each school’s class rank requirement.

*World Language Requirements - UW-Madison requires 2 years of a single world language for admission. UW-Milwaukee, UW Parkside, and UW- Platteville require 2-years of a single world language in high school, or 1-year of college world language to graduate.

WISCONSIN TECHNICAL COLLEGE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Technical college preparation should include a comprehensive high school curriculum to ensure success. The following are recommended high school courses/credits for adequate preparation for a technical college program:

TECHNICAL COLLEGE RECOMMENDED PREPARATORY COURSEWORK

Subject Credits
English 4.0
Math 3.0 - 4.0
Science 3.0 - 4.0 
Social Studies 3.0 - 4.0 
Technical Courses 3.0 - 4.0 

 

ACCEPTABLE USE OF TECHNOLOGY (Administrative Regulation 6724.1)

The purpose of the School District of Janesville’s technology resources is to support and enhance student learning and achievement in the District. Technology uses that might be acceptable on a personal account through another provider may not be acceptable in an educational environment.

INTERNET SAFETY POLICY FOR STUDENTS (Administrative Regulation 6724.2)
Internet access will be provided to students for the purpose of instruction, accessing information, conducting research, and communicating with others as part of a specific curriculum. Communication on the Internet is often very public in nature. Students are responsible for good behavior in the use of computers and the Internet, just as they are in a classroom or on school property. Parents/guardians may specifically request that their child(ren) not be provided access to the Internet by completing the “School District of Janesville Objection to Using the Internet” form.

High school students must be under on-site supervision when they are on the Internet in school. On-site supervision means the staff member responsible for the student(s) is physically present in the room in which the network is being accessed or utilized by the student(s). Students must have a specific information objective and search strategies in mind before they will be allowed to use Internet resources.

Non-Discrimination
It is the policy of the School District of Janesville that no person be denied admission to any public school in the District or be denied participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be discriminated against in any curricular, extracurricular, pupil service, recreational or other program or activity because of the person’s sex, race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability or handicap as required by state and federal laws.

Children of homeless individuals and unaccompanied homeless youth (youth not in the physical custody of a parent/guardian) residing in the District shall have equal access to the same free, appropriate public education, including comparable services, as provided to other children and youth who reside in the District. Homeless children and youth shall not be required to attend a separate school or program for homeless children and shall not be stigmatized by school personnel.

The District shall provide appropriate educational services or programs for students who have been identified as having a disability, regardless of the nature or severity of the disability. The District shall also provide for the reasonable accommodation of a student’s sincerely held religious beliefs with regard to examinations and other academic requirements. Requests for religious accommodations shall be made in writing and approved by the building principal.
 

The District encourages informal resolution of complaints under this policy. A formal complaint resolution procedure is available, however, to address allegations of violations of the District’s nondiscrimination policy.
Any complaint by a student or his/her parent or guardian regarding the interpretation or application of the provisions of Title VI, Title VII, Title IX, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or the district’s non-discrimination policy shall be processed in accordance with the procedures set forth in Board Policy 5020 and Administrative Regulations 5020.1.
For further information, contact:

Sonja Robinson, Coordinator of Student Services
School District of Janesville
527 S. Franklin St. Janesville, WI 53548
608-743-5079

To see full policy, please visit: http://www.janesville.k12.wi.us/Board-of-Education/Policies-and-Administrative-Regulations (Board Policy 5020)

ADVANCED PLACEMENT

WHAT IS ADVANCED PLACEMENT?
The Advanced Placement Program (AP) is a cooperative educational endeavor between high schools, Blackhawk Technical College, colleges or universities. It allows students to enroll in college-level courses while in high school, and gives them the opportunity to show mastery by taking an AP exam.

AP EXAM
AP exams are given during the month of May. Every student takes the same exam at the same time. Each exam consists of two sections. The first section is made up of multiple-choice questions. The other section consists of free-response questions in various formats: essays, digitally recorded responses, analysis of historical documents, extended problem solving, etc.

AP GRADES
The AP grading scale is as follows:
5 Extremely well qualified
4 Well qualified
3 Qualified
2 Possibly qualified
1 No recommendation
Students will receive their grade report in July. Most technical colleges, colleges, and universities accept AP scores of 3 or above.

BENEFITS OF AP
Students may receive credit, advanced placement or both at most colleges and universities. The amount of credit received varies on the college, AP score, and the subject. Some colleges grant up to six college credits for a score of 5. Students are also able to move into a higher level class at college as a freshman. This not only translates into time saved, but also a financial savings for each credit earned while in high school. It is possible for a student to take enough AP exams to enter college at a sophomore standing.

COST OF AP EXAMS
Students do have to pay for each exam taken. The cost is approximately $94 per exam. Students who are eligible to participate in the Federal Free or Reduced-Price Lunch Program will receive a waiver for the exam fee.

AP EXAM TIMELINE
October – Online Registration Opens
March 29th at midnight - registration for AP exams and exam fee due
May - AP exams
July - results of exams

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY


INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (IED)
This course is designed to introduce students to the design process and the tools used in product development. Students enrolled in Introduction to Engineering Design will learn through first–hand experience the activities that engineers engage in throughout the design cycle. Development of design briefs, sketching, 3D solid modeling and prototyping will provide the foundation for activities in Introduction to Engineering Design

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (POE)
Are you interested in applying your math and science skills through a mix of hands-on and academic activities? Principles of Engineering is designed to introduce students to the fundamental skill sets necessary to be a successful engineer. Utilizing technology to design experiments, students will fabricate products which meet specific industry requirements. Students may also participate in case studies and team projects.

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (DE)
Digital Electronics introduces students to the fundamentals and applications of digital electronics, programmable logic controls, and the application of electronic circuits and devices. Students will design and test digital circuitry through a blend of hands-on and academic activities.

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (ASE)
The major focus of the Aerospace Engineering course is to expose students to the world of aeronautics, flight and engineering. Students will be introduced to the Project Lead the Way activity-based, project-based, and problem-based learning through exploring the world of aerospace engineering. Students should have experience in physics, mathematics and technology education. They will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of aerospace problems.

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE (CEA)
The major focus of this course is completing long-term projects that involve the development of property sites. As students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture, they apply what they learn to the design and development of a property. The course provides teachers and students freedom to develop the property as a simulation or to students to model the experiences that civil engineers and architects face.

PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (PBS)
This course provides an introduction to the biomedical sciences through hands-on projects and problems. Students investigate concepts of biology and medicine using a case study approach. They will determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional woman as they sequentially piece together evidence found in her medical history and her autopsy report.

HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS (HSB)
This course allows students to examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal mannequin, work through interesting real world cases, and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.

MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS (MI)
Students follow the life of a fictitious family as they investigate how to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. Students explore how to detect and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; evaluate cancer treatment options; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through real-world cases, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics.

COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING (CIM)
Manufactured items are part of everyday life, yet most students have not been introduced to the high-tech, innovative nature of modern manufacturing. At the same time, it teaches students about the manufacturing processer, product design, robotics, and automation. Students can earn a virtual manufacturing badge recognized by the National Manufacturing Badge System.

ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (EDD)
The knowledge and skills students acquire throughout PLTW Engineering come together in EDD as they identify an issue and then research, design, and test a solution, ultimately presenting their solution to a panel of engineers. Students apply the professional skills they have developed to document a design process to standards, completing EDD ready to take on post-secondary program or career.

WORK-BASED LEARNING EXPERIENCES

YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP
The Wisconsin Youth Apprenticeship (YA) program is a state-wide initiative for high school juniors and seniors that integrate school-based and work-based learning to instruct students in employability and occupational skills. In this program, students are enrolled in academic classes to fulfill high school graduation requirements in addition to 2-4 semesters of technical courses, which can be offered at the local high school, work site, or Blackhawk Technical College. The last component of the YA program is a paid, work experience in the student’s chosen industry under the guidance of a skilled mentor.
A Certificate of Proficiency in the specific program area will be earned if the identified business/industry competencies’ are completed to the proficiency level identified by the Governor’s Work-based Learning Board (GWBLB). Youth Apprenticeship programs available in Janesville are:

  • Agriculture Architectural Drafting and Design
  • Automotive Auto body
  • Manufacturing Machining Marketing
  • Mechanical Drafting and Design Principles of Engineering

For more information, please see page 108.

MENTORSHIP
Students in a mentorship program earn credit by attending a class that is at a local place of business. Students will learn employability skills, habits, and attitudes conducive to employment success. Mentorship offers the students an opportunity to “try” a career. It assists students to choose a career wisely, prepare for employment suited to their abilities and interests, and learn to work with others in successful and rewarding ways. This course is designed to provide students with real-life work experience within the Janesville community. Prospective students must fill out a statement of interest and obtain teacher recommendations. For more information, please see page 108.

PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP
The Professional Internship is designed to provide a challenging opportunity for motivated, responsible students who are ready to direct their own learning. After an initial period of classroom instruction dealing with leadership, ethics, critical and creative thinking, students will gain experience through career exploration in a business, non-profit, government or academic setting. Students will be released during the class period as part of the 50-hour field experience with their professional mentor. Additional contact hours can be arranged as agreed upon by student, teacher and mentor. A detailed log, portfolio and final project are presented at the completion of the course. Prospective students must fill out a statement of interest and obtain teacher recommendations. See instructor for forms. For more information, please see page 108.

ELEVATE: GLOBAL BUSINESS (Craig HS Only)
Elevate is an innovative education capstone, designed by Craig High School, to give students hands-on, real-world experiences immersed in a professional setting. Students engage in a rigorous curriculum while also learning valuable skills for high-demand careers. Industry partners provide real project work and opportunities for students to build portfolios and resumes. Students are mentored by professionals with each course integrating guest instructors who discuss course-related content. Students enter Elevate with a strong academic background and leave with skills and experience to lead the next generation workforce. The Global Business strand will be comprised of the following classes.
International Business (1 semester)

  • Entrepreneurship (1 semester)
  • AS Oral Communication (1 semester)
  • AS Written Communication (1 semester)
  • Finance and Investing (1 semester)
  • AS Economics (1 semester)

For application information, please see Mr. Miles or Mr. Elsen at Craig High School.

Janesville International Education Program

GLOBAL EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT CERTIFICATE

Requirements & Application Process
Craig High School • Parker High School • ARISE Virtual Academy • Rock River Charter School • Rock University High School • TAGOS Leadership Academy

The Global Education Achievement Certificate is a distinction that School District of Janesville students have the opportunity to earn through coursework, experiences and reflections to develop cultural literacy, participation in global activities, and contributions through global service projects. To be considered, students must document those activities and reflections as evidence of meeting the Global Scholar criteria for review by the Global Scholar committee. Names of students whom them committee verifies to have successfully met the Global Scholar criteria will be submitted to the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) for award. Students will receive a Global Education Achievement Certificate from DPI, will have the Global Scholar designation recorded on their transcripts at the time of graduation, and may receive a Global Education Achievement seal on their diploma.

REQUIREMENTS

  • 1. Coursework
    • a. Four credits in one world language (including English courses for students whose native language is not English)
    • b. Four credits in courses with global content. One credit may be one year of a second world language.
  • 2. Eight Reflections demonstrating cultural literacy
    • a. Minimum of four reflections on books
    • b. Minimum of one reflection on art, music, or film
  • 3. Participation in school wide global activities
  • 4. A minimum of twenty hours work on a global service project.

APPLICATION PROCESS

Students choosing to work towards the Global Education Achievement Certificate are responsible for all activities and documentation. Students should contact Social Studies and World Language Teachers or Guidance Counselors with questions or concerns. Qualifying seniors must submit documentation of all requirements including the attached documentation “trackers” and eight reflections via Google folder shared with geac@janesville.k12.wi.us. Google folders must be named with “First Name and Last Name, GEAC Application, Graduation Year.” Complete folders must be shared by the last day of 3rd quarter prior to graduation.

 

COURSEWORK PLANNER/TRACKER FOR GLOBAL EDUCATION ACHIEVEMENT CERTIFICATION

Download here

World Language Coursework—Required 4.0 credits in one language
Native Language: Language of Coursework:
Approved World Language courses include:
French I, French II, French III, French IV Honors, French V Honors, AP French, Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III, Spanish IV Honors, Spanish V Honors, AP Spanish, Spanish for Heritage Speakers I, Spanish for Heritage Speakers II, Chinese I, Chinese II, Chinese III, Chinese IV Honors, Chinese V Honors.
For students whose native language is not English, approved English courses include:
Beginning English Language Development, English for Mastery I, English for Mastery II, English for Mastery III, and any English Department courses that count for required English credits.
1.
2.
3.
4.

CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES PLANNER/TRACKER

Approved Activities: Amnesty International, French Club, French Honor Society, Spanish Club, Spanish Honor Society, Russian Club (CHS only), Sierra Club, Sign Language Club, Human Relations, Japanese Club (PHS only)
Activities Which May Be Approved Based on Evidence of Global Content: Honor Society, Science Honor Society, Quill & Scroll, Debate, Teen Book Club, International travel and/or being a host family for an international guest.
Advisor Signature
1.  
2.  
3.  
4.  

Add additional rows as needed.

 

GLOBAL COMMUNITY SERVICE PLANNER/TRACKER

Global Service Hours—Minimum of 20 Hours Required
Date Service Activity Related Organization* ( if applicable) Hours Adult Signature
         
         
         
         
         
         

Add additional rows as needed.
*School-based organizations which may provide opportunities for global service learning: Amnesty International, Kiwanis Key Club, Leo Club, Lettermen’s Club, Link Crew, Octagon Club, Sierra Club, Live United, Parker Green Squad, BRO, SIS, Latino Leadership

 

REFLECTIONS PLANNER

Reflections on Books, Art, Music, and/or Film—8 Required including at least 4 Books and 1 Film
Title of Work Type of Work ( book, art, film) Reflection Method (written, presentation, other)
1.    
2.    
3.    
4.    
5.    
6.    
7.    
8.    

 

ACADEMIC AND CAREER PLANNING: OVERVIEW

A Wisconsin law passed in 2013 says that every school district must provide Academic and Career Planning (ACP) services to students in grades 6-12 beginning in the 2017-18 school year.

ACP is critical because it helps students create and cultivate their own visions for post-secondary success, obtained through self-exploration, career exploration, and the development of career management and planning skills. Teachers, parents, and various partners assist students in this process by helping them deepen their knowledge of themselves, improve their understanding of postsecondary options, better connect their goals to educational coursework and career interests, and take part in long-term planning for life after high school.
In order to support students in their Academic and Career planning, we have aligned our subject selection handbook using the national Career Cluster framework to assist in our efforts, and created a more comprehensive Academic and Career Planning Guide.
 

Career Cluster Framework: The career cluster framework provides a sequential path for students to take a career interest and develop it into job potential. The 16 broad career clusters are broken down into 79 specific pathways. Students will be able to learn about multiple careers within each pathway and choose one program of study available in their school, which will be developed through the process laid out in this manual. That POS will be tied to community needs, specific partnerships, and a sequence of courses which will provide a channel for students to move seamlessly from high school to a post-secondary institution. The POS becomes a foundation for each students’ Academic and Career Plan, which is a portfolio of student accomplishment in preparation for post-secondary education or the work force.

Career Clusters are broad occupational groupings based on a set of common knowledge and skills required for a broad group of careers. Wisconsin has adopted the National 16 Career Clusters that also serve as a tool for organizing curriculum and instruction. Career clusters provide opportunities for all students regardless of their career goals and interests. They are a tool for a seamless educational system that blends rigorous academic/technical preparation, provides career development, offers options for students to experience all aspects of a business or industry, and facilitates/assists students and educators with ongoing transitions.

Career Pathways are a sub-grouping of careers used as an organizing tool for curriculum design and instruction. Similar to career clusters, career pathways are grouped based on their requirements for a set of core and similar knowledge and skills for career success. Each pathway highlights a specific part of each cluster. An easy example of this can be seen in the Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources cluster. Seven different pathways, from Animal to Plant Systems highlight the variety of interests that each cluster holds for students. Career Pathways are critical to 21st Century schools and learners. Each pathway is grounded in a set of four guiding principles:

  1.  Career Pathways prepare students for post-secondary education and careers. A Pathway is always about both objectives; it is never a choice between one or the other.
  2.  Career Pathways connect academics to real-world applications. Each Pathway integrates challenging academics with a demanding career and technical educational curriculum. Pathways alter how core academic subjects are taught; they do not lower expectations about what is taught.
  3.  Career Pathways lead to the full range of post-secondary opportunities. Pathways prepare students for all the avenues they might pursue following high school graduation—two- and four-year college, certification programs, apprenticeships, formal job training, and military service. Each Pathway represents a broad industry theme that can appeal to and engage a student regardless of prior academic achievement and post-secondary aspirations. 20 | P a g e
  4.  Career Pathways improve student achievement. Pathways and Programs of Study are based on accountability. They are designed to produce higher levels of achievement in a number of measurable arenas, including academic and technical scores, high school completion, post-secondary transitions to career and education, and attainment of a formal post-secondary credential.

A Program of Study is a specific career pathway, defined by a local school/district partnership, which is a sequence of instruction based on recommended standards and knowledge and skills, consisting of coursework, co-curricular activities, worksite learning, service learning and other learning experiences including Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSO). The sequence of instruction provides preparation for a career.

Academic and Career Plan (ACP) includes a program of study and learning that represents a fluid, living, breathing, mapped academic plan reflecting a student’s unique set of interests, needs, learning goals, and graduation requirements. It goes beyond the “four-year plan” by recording the student’s connections to the larger community including examples of community service and volunteerism; membership in community organizations; participation in leadership activities outside of school; involvement in job shadowing, mentorships, and/or apprenticeships; and the pursuit of skill development through hobbies, athletics, and fine arts.

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction has created as a resource to help leadership teams get started with ACP planning and implementation. This link can be found at: ACP Implementation Guide


POST-SECONDARY PLANNING

Students can utilize Wisconsin’s Early College Credit Program or Start College Now, courses that provide Transcripted Credit/Advanced Standing, and Advanced Placement coursework, as well as Career Experience and Service Learning credit, to begin some of their post-secondary education while still in High School

THE 16 CAREER CLUSTERS

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources The production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing, and development of agricultural commodities and resources including food, fiber, wood products, natural resources, horticulture, and other plant and animal products/resources.
Architecture & Construction Careers in designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment.
Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Designing, producing, exhibiting, performing, writing, and publishing multimedia content including visual and performing arts and design, journalism, and entertainment services.
Business Management & Administration Careers in planning, organizing, directing, and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive business operations.
Education & Training Planning, managing and providing education and training services, and related learning support services such as administration, teaching/training, administrative support, and professional support services.
Finance Planning and related services for financial and investment planning, banking, insurance, and business financial management.
Government & Public Administration Planning and executing government functions at the local, state and federal levels, including governance, national security, foreign service, planning, revenue and taxation, and regulations.
Health Science Planning, managing, and providing therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development.
Hospitality & Tourism Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs such as restaurant and food/beverage services, lodging, travel and tourism, recreation, amusement and attractions.
Human Services Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs such as counseling and mental health services, family and community services, personal care, and consumer services.
Information Technology Building linkages in IT occupations for entry level, technical, and professional careers related to the design, development, support and management of hardware, software, multimedia and systems integration services.
Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security Planning, managing, and providing legal, public safety, protective services and homeland security, including professional and technical support services.
Manufacturing Planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance and manufacturing/process engineering.
Marketing Planning, managing, and performing marketing activities to reach organizational objectives such as brand management, professional sales, merchandising, marketing communications and market research.
Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and technical services (e.g., physical science, social science, engineering) including laboratory and testing services, and research and development services.
Transportation, Distribution & Logistics The planning, management, and movement of people, materials, and goods by road, pipeline, air, rail and water and related professional and technical support services such as transportation infrastructure planning and management, logistics services, mobile equipment and facility maintenance.

My top three Career Clusters of interest are:

1. ___________________________   2.________________________  3. ________________________

 

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources The production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing, and development of agricultural commodities and resources including food, fiber, wood products, natural resources, horticulture, and other plant and animal products/resources

Do you have an interest in:

Animals  Foods
  • Working with sick or injured animals
  • Working with companion animals like dogs and cats
  • Working with unique species such as fish for food
  • A medical field
  • Marine biology
  • What makes bread rise and pop fizz
  • Being a food scientist
  • Designing new food and flavors
  • How science is used to process your food
  • Chemistry and its application to food
Natural Resources Plants
  • Native fish and their aquatic habits
  • Forest ecosystems
  • Preservation of endangered species
  • Wolves and whitetails in Wisconsin
  • Caring for plants in your home or yard
  • Designing landscapes for homes or businesses
  • Developing new plants or modifying existing ones
  • What plants need to grow successfully

 

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

Food Products and Processing Systems

  • Plant Systems •Animal Systems
  • Power, Structural & Technical Systems
  • Natural Resource Systems
  • Agribusiness Systems
  • Environmental Service Systems


CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL


On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Bee Keeper
  • Fisherman
  • Nursery Worker
  • Stable Worker
  • Crop Sprayer
  • Landscape
  • Pet Groomer
  • Vet Hospital Worker
  • Farm Worker
  • Logger
  • Pet Shop Worker

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE


Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Arborist
  • Crop and/or Animal Farmer
  • Genetic Technologist
  • Quality Food Control Specialist
  • Animal Control Officer
  • Environmental Technician
  • Golf Course Manager
  • Turf Manager
  • Animal Nutritionist
  • Farrier
  • Greenhouse Manager
  • Veterinary Technician
  • Bio-Tech Lab Technician
  • Fish and Game Officer
  • Horticulturist
  • Waste Water Technician
  • Cheese Maker
  • Forestry Technician
  • Landscape Designer

 

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE

 

Colleges/Universities

  • Agricultural Commodities Broker
  • Animal Scientist
  • Geneticist
  • Soil Scientist
  • Agricultural Economist
  • Biochemist
  • Greenhouse Operator
  • Toxicologist
  • Agricultural Educator
  • Botanist
  • Landscape Architect
  • USDA Inspector
  • Agricultural Engineer
  • Entomologist
  • Marine Biologist
  • Veterinarian
  • Agricultural Sales & Communications
  • Food Scientist
  • Plant Pathologist
  • Wildlife Biologist
  • Agriculture Banker
  • Forester
  • Soil Geologist
  • Zoologist
  • Animal Psychologist
  • Game Warden

Architecture & Construction Careers in designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environment

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Work with my hands.
  • Read and follow blueprints and/or instructions
  • Picture in my mind what a finished product looks like
  • Perform work that requires precise results
  • Solve technical problems
  • Visit and learn from beautiful, historic, or interesting buildings
  • Follow logical, step-by-step procedures
Personal qualities that describe me: School subjects that I like:
  • Curious
  • Good at following directions
  • Pay attention to detail
  • Good at visualizing possibilities
  • Patient and persistent
  • Math
  • Drafting
  • Physical Sciences
  • Construction Trades
  • Electrical Trades/Heat, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration/Technical Education

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

Design/Pre-Construction •Construction •Maintenance/Operations

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL

On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  •  Construction Laborer
  •  Highway Maintenance Worker
  •  Grading & Leveling Machine Operator
  •  Construction Worker Helper
  •  Roofer
  •  Heavy Equipment Operator
  •  Fence Builder
  •  Tile Setter
  •  Groundskeeper and Gardener

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  •  HVAC Technician
  •  Carpenter
  •  Electrician
  •  Plasterer
  •  Architectural Drafter
  •  Cement Mason
  •  Glazier
  •  Plumber
  •  Bricklayer
  •  Drywall Installer
  •  Pipefitter
  •  Tile Setter
  •  Civil Engineering Technician
  •  Electrical Engineering Technician

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities
 

  • Architect
  • Civil Engineer
  • Grounds Supervisor
  • Building Contractor
  • Cost Estimator
  • Interior Design
  • C.A.D. Designer
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Landscape Architect

Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Designing, producing, exhibiting, performing, writing, and publishing multimedia content including visual and performing arts and design, journalism, and entertainment services.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Use my imagination to communicate new information to others
  • Perform in front of others
  • Read and write
  • Play a musical instrument
  • Perform creative, artistic activities
  • Use video and recording technology
  • Design brochures and posters
  • Creative and imaginative
  • Good communicator/good vocabulary
  • Curious about new technology
  • Relate well to feelings and thoughts of others
  • Determined/tenaciousw logical, step-by-step procedures
  School subjects that I like:
 
  • Art/Graphic Design
  • Music
  • Speech and Drama
  • Journalism/Literature
  • Audiovisual Technologies
PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER
 
  • Audio and Video Technology and Film •Printing Technology •Visual Arts
  • Performing Arts •Journalism and Broadcasting •Telecommunications
CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience
 
  • Floral Designer
  • Proofreader
  • Mural Painter
  • Food Stylist
  • Sign Designer/Painter
  • Photographer
  • Musician
  • Stained Glass
  • Pre-Press

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience
 
  •  Animator
  •  Craft Artist
  •  Taxidermist
  •  Potter
  •  Bookbinder
  •  Prepress Technician
  •  Public Relations Manager
  •  Graphic Designer
  •  Broadcast Technician
  •  Printing Press Operator
  •  Sign Painter
  •  Music Repair Technician
  •  Caption Writer
  •  Recording Technician
  •  Communications Line Maintainer
BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities
 
  •  Animator
  •  Photographer
  •  Interior Decorator
  •  Musician
  •  Artist
  •  Potter
  •  Art Teacher/Professor
  •  Music Teacher
  •  Cinematographer
  •  Set Designers Reporter
  •  Art Therapist
  •  Music Therapist
  •  Composer
  •  Illustrator
  •  Graphic Designer
  •  Music Repair
  •  Copy Editor
  •  Jeweler
  •  Videographer
  •  Composer
  •  Dancer
  •  Architect
  •  Journalist
  •  Recording Engineer

Business Management & Administration Careers in planning, organizing, directing and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive business operations.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Perform routine, organized activities, but can be flexible
  • Work with numbers and detailed information
  • Be the leader in a group
  • Make business contact with people
  • Work with computer programs
  • Create reports and communicate ideas
  • Plan my work and follow instructions without close supervision
  • Organized
  • Practical and logical
  • Be the leader in a group
  • Patient
  • Tactful
  • Responsible
  School subjects that I like:
 
  • Computer Applications/Business and Information Technology
  • Accounting
  • Math
  • English
  • Economics

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Administrative Support
  • Business Information Management
  • General Management
  • Human Resources Management
  • Operations Management

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Bank Teller
  • Receptionist
  • Billing, Cost and Rate Clerk
  • Caterer
  • Telephone Operator
  • Hospital Admitting Clerk
  • File Clerk
  • Typist
  • Data Entry Clerk
  • Mail Clerk
  • Human Resource Clerk
  • Hotel Clerk
  • Meter Reader

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Accountant
  • Court Reporter
  • Tax Preparer
  • Word Processor
  • Administrative Assistant
  • Kennel Owner
  • Funeral Director
  • Retail Sales Supervisor
  • Computer Operator
  • Small Business Owner
  • Management Trainee
  • Industrial Clerk
  • Court Reporter
  • Stenographer

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Accountant – CPA
  • Health Care Administrator
  • Theater Manager
  • Advertising Manager
  • Human Resource Manager
  • Travel Agency Manager
  • Art Director
  • Instrument Sales/Manufacturing
  • Musician’s Agent
  • Business and Industry Consultant
  • Marketing Manager
  • Event Planner
  • Marketing Music Jingle Writer
  • Sales Representative

Education & Training Planning, managing, and providing education and training services, and related learning support services such as administration, teaching/training, administrative, support, and professional support services.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Communicate with different types of people
  • Help others with their homework or to learn new things
  • Go to school
  • Direct and plan activities for others
  • Handle several responsibilities at once
  • Acquire new information
  • Help people overcome their challenges
  • Friendly
  • Decision maker
  • Helpful
  • Innovative/Inquisitive
  • Good listener
  School subjects that I like:

 

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies
  • Math
  • Science
  • Psychology

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Administration and Administrative Support •Professional Support Services •Teaching/Training

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Aerobics Instructor
  • Dance Teacher
  • Self-Enrichment Teacher
  • Child Care Assistant
  • Library Assistant

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Preschool Teacher
  • Library Technician
  • Sign Language Interpreter
  • Teacher Assistant
  • Computer Installation and Demonstration

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Apprenticeship Consultant
  • School Psychologist
  • School Counselor
  • Bilingual Educator
  • Secondary School Teacher
  • University Professor
  • Educational Administrator
  • Teacher of the Blind
  • Training Program Manager
  • Instructional Coordinator
  • Vocational Education Teacher
  • Elementary School Teacher
  • Kindergarten Teacher
  • Librarian
  • Special Education Teacher
  • Music Teacher
  • Speech-Language Pathologist
  • Adult Literacy Teacher
  • Music Therapist

Finance Planning, and related services for financial and investment planning, banking, insurance, and business financial management.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Work with numbers
  • Work to meet a deadline
  • Make predictions based on existing facts
  • Have a framework of rules by which to operate
  • Analyze financial information and interpret it to others
  • Handle money with accuracy and reliability
  • Take pride in the way I dress and look
  • Trustworthy
  • Orderly
  • Self-confident
  • Logical
  • Methodical or efficient
  School subjects that I like:

 

  • Accounting
  • Math
  • Economics
  • Banking/Financial Services
  • Business Law

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Accounting •Banking Services •Business Finance
  • Insurance •Securities and Investments

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Bill and Account Collector
  • Brokerage Clerk
  • Cashier

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Accountant
  • Financial Institution Manager
  • Loan Officer
  • Brokerage Clerk
  • Insurance Agent
  • Personal Property Appraiser
  • Claims Adjuster
  • Investigator and Adjustor

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Accountant – CPA
  • Credit Analyst
  • Economist
  • Actuary
  • Credit Card Operations Manager
  • Financial Advisor
  • Auditor
  • Insurance Underwriter
  • Stockbroker
  • Brokerage Clerk
  • Investment Advisor
  • Real Estate Appraiser
  • Business and Industry Consultant
  • Music Store Accountant
  • Controller
  • School District Business Manager

Government & Public Administration Planning and executing government functions at the local, state and federal levels, including governance, national security, foreign service, planning, revenue and taxation, and regulations.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Be involved in politics
  • Negotiate, defend, and debate ideas and topics
  • Plan activities and work cooperatively with others
  • Work with details
  • Perform a variety of duties that may change often
  • Analyze information and interpret it to others
  • Travel and see things that are new to me
  • Good communicator
  • Competitive
  • Service minded
  • Well organized
  • Problem solver
  School subjects that I like:

 

  • Government
  • Language Arts
  • History
  • Math
  • Foreign Language

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Governance
  • National Security
  • Foreign Service
  • Planning
  • Revenue and Taxation
  • Regulation
  • Public Management and Administration

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Mail Carrier
  •  Postal Clerk
  •  Driver License Examiner
  •  Mail Handling Machine Operator
  •  License Clerk
  •  Infantry Forces

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Coroner
  •  Title Examiner
  •  Postmaster
  •  City Planning Aid
  •  Accountant
  •  Transportation Inspector
  •  Building Inspector
  •  Association Executive
  •  Infantry Forces
  •  Special Forces

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  •  Accountant
  •  Emergency Management Specialist
  •  Legislator
  •  Apprenticeship Consultant
  •  Equal Opportunity Specialist
  •  Music Administrator
  •  Aviation Security Specialist
  •  Infantry Officer
  •  Political Scientist
  •  City Manager
  •  Lawyer
  •  Urban Planner
  •  Dean of Students
  •  Special Operations Officer
  •  Peace Corps Volunteer
  •  Occupational Health & Safety Specialist
  •  Social Services Administrator
  •  Translator and Interpreter

Health Science Planning and executing government functions at the local, state and federal levels, including governance, national security, foreign service, planning, revenue and taxation, and regulations.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Work under pressure
  • Help sick people and animals
  • Make decisions based on logic and information
  • Participate in health and science classes
  • Respond quickly and calmly in emergencies
  • Work as a member of a team
  • Follow guidelines precisely and meet strict standards of accuracy
  • Compassionate and caring
  • Good at following directions
  • Conscientious and careful
  • Patient
  • Good listener
  School subjects that I like:

 

  • Biological Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Math
  • Occupational Health classes
  • Language Arts

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Therapeutic Services •Diagnostic Services •Health Informatics
  • Support Services •Biotechnology Research and Development

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Certified Nursing Assistant
  • Clerk
  • Food Service Worker
  • Hospital Admitting

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  •  Emergency Medical Technician
  •  Surgical Technician
  •  Dental Assistant
  •  Home Health Aide
  •  Translator and Interpreter
  •  Dental Hygienist
  •  Massage Therapist
  •  Ultrasound Technician
  •  Dialysis Technician
  •  Physical Therapy Aide
  •  Medical Assistant
  •  Occupational Therapy Assistant
  •  Radiology Technologist
  •  Registered Nurse

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Athletic Trainer
  • Pharmacist
  • Podiatrist
  • Chiropractor
  • Primary Care Physician
  • Oral Surgeon
  • Dentist
  • Psychiatrist
  • Registered Nurse
  • Dietician
  • Surgeon
  • Nurse Practitioner
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Geneticist
  • Anesthesiologist
  • Music Therapist
  • Statistician
  • Hemotherapist

Hospitality & Tourism Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs such as restaurant and food/beverage services, lodging, travel and tourism, recreation, amusement and attractions.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Investigate new places and activities
  • Work with all ages and types of people
  • Organize activities in which other people enjoy themselves
  • Have a flexible schedule
  • Help people make up their minds
  • Communicate easily, tactfully, and courteously
  • Learn about other cultures
  • Tactful
  • Self-motivated
  • Works well with others
  • Outgoing
  • Slow to anger
  School subjects that I like:

 

  • Language Arts/Speech
  • Foreign Language
  • Social Sciences
  • Marketing
  • Food Services

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Restaurants and Food/Beverage Services •Lodging •Travel and Tourism
  • Recreation, Amusements and Attractions

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Baggage Porter and Bellhop
  • Furniture Refinisher
  • Hotel Clerk
  • Cake Decorator
  • Guide
  • Waiter/Waitress
  • Concierge
  • Usher
  • Short Order Cook
  • Food Attendant
  • Janitor and Hotel/Motel Cleaner
  • Restaurant Host/Hostess
  • Gaming Change Person and Booth Cashier
  • Wardrobe and Dressing Room Attendant

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE

  • Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience
  • Club Manager
  • Motel/Hotel Manager
  • Translator and Interpreter
  • Conference Planner
  • Recreation Director
  • Caterer
  • Food Service Supervisor
  • Restaurant Manager
  • Concierge
  • Household Manager
  • Taxidermist
  • Restaurant Cook/Chef

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Archivist
  • Historian
  • Resort Manager
  • Coach
  • Musicians Agent
  • Theatre Manager
  • Conservation Technician
  • Park Ranger
  • Translator and Interpreter
  • Curator
  • Recreation Director
  • Zookeeper

Human Services Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs such as counseling and mental health services, family and community services, personal care, and consumer services.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Care about people, their needs, and their problems
  • Participate in community services and/or volunteering
  • Listen to other people’s viewpoints
  • Help people be at their best
  • Work with people from preschool age to old age
  • Think of new ways to do things
  • Make friends with different kinds of people
  • Good communicator/good listener
  • Caring
  • Non-materialistic
  • Uses intuition and logic
  • Non-judgmental
  School subjects that I like:

 

  • Language Arts
  • Psychology/Sociology
  • Family and Consumer Sciences
  • Finance
  • Foreign Language

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Early Childhood Development and Services •Counseling and Mental Health Services
  • Family and Community Services •Personal Care Services •Consumer Services

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Aerobics Instructor
  • Crossing Guard
  • Household Cook
  • Nanny

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Community Organization Worker
  • Institutional Cook
  • Shoe Repairer
  • Cosmetologist
  • Nail Technician
  • Skin Care Specialist
  • Funeral Director
  • Preschool Teacher
  • Child Care Assistant
  • Embalmer

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Dietician
  • Psychiatrist
  • Financial Counselor
  • Investment Advisor
  • Psychologist
  • Personal Counselor
  • Liturgical Minister
  • School Counselor
  • Religious Worker
  • Clergy
  • Sociologist
  • Vocational Rehab Counselor
  • Music Therapy
  • Social Worker
  • Career Counselor
  • Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor

Information Technology Building linkages in IT occupations for entry level, technical, and professional careers related to the design, development, support and management of hardware, software, multimedia, and systems integration services

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Work with computers
  • Reason clearly and logically to solve complex problems
  • Use machines, techniques, and processes
  • Read technical materials and diagrams and solve technical problems
  • Adapt to change
  • Play video games and figure out how they work
  • Concentrate for long periods without being distracted
  • Logic/analytical thinker
  • See details in the big picture
  • Persistent
  • Good concentration skills
  • Precise and accurate
  School subjects that I like:
 
  • Math
  • Science
  • Computer Tech/Applications
  • Communications
  • Graphic Design

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Network Systems
  • Information Support and Services
  • Web and Digital Communications
  • Programming and Software Development

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience
Careers in this field require more than minimal experience or on-the-job training

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Computer Support Specialist
  • Sound Manager
  • Computer System Analyst
  • Recording Engineer
  • Tool Programmer
  • Webmaster

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Animator
  • Software Engineer
  • Computer Programmer
  • Computer Engineer
  • Webmaster
  • Computer Security Specialist
  • Computer Network Coordinator
  • Video Game Designer
  • Information Scientist
  • Database Administrator
  • Computer Systems Analyst
  • Illustrator
  • Scientific and Engineering Programmer
  • Medical and Scientific Illustrator

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security Planning, managing, and providing legal, public safety, protective services and homeland security, including professional and technical support services

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Work under pressure or in the face of danger
  • Make decisions based on my own observations
  • Interact with other people
  • Be in positions of authority
  • Respect rules and regulations
  • Debate and win arguments
  • Observe and analyze people’s behavior
  • Adventurous
  • Dependable
  • Community-minded
  • Decisive
  • Optimistic
  School subjects that I like:
 
  • Language Arts
  • Psychology/Sociology
  • Government/History
  • Law Enforcement
  • First Aid/First Responder

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Correction Services
  • Emergency and Fire Management Services
  • Security and Protective Services
  • Law Enforcement Services
  • Legal Services

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Correctional Officer
  • Parking Enforcement Officer
  • Crossing Guard
  • Dispatcher
  • Security Guard

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  •  Bailiff
  •  Legal Secretary
  •  Police Officer
  •  Copyright Law
  •  Musician Law
  •  Fire Inspector
  •  Court Reporter
  •  Paralegal Assistant
  •  Police Canine Trainer
  •  Emergency Medical Technician
  •  Park Ranger
  •  Firefighter

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  •  Adjudicator
  •  Park Ranger
  •  State Patrol Officer
  •  Arbitrator
  •  Probation and Parole Officer
  •  Police Officer
  •  FBI Agent
  •  Fingerprint Examiner
  •  Conservation Warden
  •  Judge
  •  Correctional Officer Supervisor
  •  Forensic Science Technician
  •  Judicial Law Clerk
  •  Private Detective
  •  Lawyer
  • ] Emergency Management Specialist

Manufacturing Planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, and manufacturing/process engineering

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
Work with my hands and learn that way
Put things together
Do routine, organized and accurate work
Perform activities that produce tangible results
Apply math to work out solutions
Use hand and power tools and operate equipment/machinery
Visualize objects in three dimensions from flat drawings
  • Practical
  • Observant
  • Physically active
  • Step-by-step thinker
  • Coordinated
  School subjects that I like:
 
  • Math-Geometry
  • Chemistry
  • Trade and Industry Courses
  • Physics
  • Language Arts

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Health, Safety and Environmental Assurance •Logistics and Inventory Control
  • Maintenance, Installation and Repair •Manufacturing Product Process Development
  • Production •Quality Assurance

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Brush Painter
  • Oil Well Driller
  • Production Assembler
  • Engraver
  • Tire Builder
  • Order Filler
  • Hand Worker
  • Production and Planning Clerk
  • Apparel and Home Furnishings Dyer

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Apparel Pattern Maker
  • Locksmith
  • Combination Welder
  • Computer technician
  • Musical Instrument Repairer
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Electrical Appliance Technician
  • Electric Motor Technician
  • Quality Control Technician
  • Industrial Engineering Technician
  • Tool and Die Maker
  • Machinist
  • Electronic Engineering Technician

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Electrical Engineer
  • Environmental Engineer
  • Stage and Sound
  • Electronic Engineer
  • Industrial Engineer
  • Production Supervisor
  • Engineering Manager
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Musical Instrument Design
  • Equipment Manufacturer
  • Occupational Health and Safety Inspector
  • Communications Operations Manager

Marketing Planning, managing, and performing marketing activities to reach organizational objectives such as brand management, professional sales, merchandising, marketing communications and market research.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Shop and go to the mall
  • Be in charge
  • Make displays and promote ideas
  • Give presentations and enjoy public speaking
  • Persuade people to buy products or to participate in activities
  • Communicate my ideas to other people
  • Take advantage of opportunities to make extra money
  • Enthusiastic
  • Competitive
  • Creative
  • Self-motivated
  • Persuasive
  School subjects that I like:
 
  • Language Arts
  • Math
  • Business Education/Marketing
  • Economics
  • Computer Applications

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Marketing Communications
  • Marketing Management
  • Marketing Research
  • Merchandising
  • Professional Sales

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Antique/Collectible Dealer
  • Cashier
  • Counter Clerk
  • Street Vendor
  • Telemarketer
  • Classified Ad Clerk
  • News Vendor
  • Wedding Planner
  • Customer Service Representative

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Advertising Layout Designer
  • Auto Salesperson
  • Real Estate Agent
  • Advertising Sales Representative
  • Buyer
  • Instrument Sales
  • Auctioneer

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Advertising Account Executive
  • Public Relations Manager
  • Insurance Agent
  • Advertising Manager
  • Purchasing Agent
  • Purchasing Manager
  • Business Agent
  • Research Analyst
  • Market Research Analyst
  • Marketing Manager
  • Real Estate Broker
  • Public Relations Practitioner

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Planning, managing, and performing marketing activities to reach organizational objectives such as brand management, professional sales, merchandising, marketing communications and market research.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Interpret formulas
  • Find answers to questions
  • Work in a laboratory
  • Figure out how things work and investigate new things
  • Explore new technology
  • Experiment to find the best way to do something
  • Pay attention to details and help things be precise
  • Detail oriented
  • Inquisitive
  • Objective
  • Methodical
  • Mechanically inclined
  School subjects that I like:
 
  • Math
  • Science
  • Drafting/Computer Aided Drafting
  • Electronics/Computer Networking
  • Technical Classes/Technology Education

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Engineering and Technology
  • Science and Math

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  • Statistical Clerk

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Biological Technician
  • Veterinary Technician
  • Electronics Engineering Technician
  • Chemical Technician
  • Mechanical Engineering Technician
  • Civil Engineering Technician
  • Civil Engineering Technician
  • Nuclear Technician
  • Petroleum Technician
  • Mathematical Technician
  • Industrial Engineering Technician

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

  • Aerospace Engineer
  • Civil Engineer
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Anthropologist
  • Computer Engineer
  • Metallurgist
  • Archeologist
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Mining Engineer
  • Astronomer
  • Geologist
  • Nuclear Engineer
  • Biomedical Engineer
  • Industrial Engineer
  • Solar Engineer
  • Chemical Engineer
  • Mathematician
  • Solar Engineer
  • Statistician

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics The planning, management, and movement of people, materials, and goods by road, pipeline, air, rail and water and related professional and technical support services such as transportation infrastructure planning and management, logistics services, mobile equipment, and facility maintenance.

Interest & Abilities

Activities that describe what I like to do: Personal qualities that describe me:
  • Travel
  • See well and have quick reflexes
  • Solve mechanical problems
  • Design efficient processes
  • Anticipate needs and prepare to meet them
  • Drive or ride
  • Move things from one place to another
  • Realistic
  • Mechanical
  • Coordinated
  • Observant
  • Planner
  School subjects that I like:
 
  • Math
  • Trade and Industry courses
  • Physical Sciences
  • Economics
  • Foreign Language

PATHWAYS IN THIS CLUSTER

  • Transportation Operations
  • Logistics Planning and Management Services
  • Warehousing and Distribution Center Operations
  • Facility and Mobile Equipment Maintenance
  • Sales and Service
  • Health, Safety and Environmental Management
  • Facility Transportation Systems/Infrastructure Planning, Management and Regulation

CAREER OPTIONS FROM HIGH SCHOOL
On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

  •  Bus Driver
  •  Reservation and Ticket Clerk
  •  Traffic Clerk
  •  Deckhand
  •  Service Station Attendant
  •  Taxicab Driver
  •  Delivery Driver
  •  Shipping and Receiving Clerk
  •  Light Truck Driver
  •  Highway Maintenance Worker

CAREERS WITH CERTIFICATION/ASSOCIATE DEGREE
Community college, technical college, apprenticeship, experience

  • Aircraft Mechanic
  • Diesel Technician
  • Security Consultant
  • Auto Body Technician
  • Motorcycle Technician
  • Travel Agent
  • Automobile Painter
  • Railroad Conductor
  • Flight Attendant
  • Cartographic Technician

BACHELORS, PRE-PROFESSIONAL OR HIGHER DEGREE
Colleges/Universities

• Airline Pilot
• Environmentalist
• Mining Manager
• Air Traffic Controller
• Locomotive Engineer
• Public Health Sanitarian
• Astronaut
• Mechanical Engineer
• Travel Agency Manager

 


Career Cluster Course Recommendations


Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

Introduction to Agriculture
Written Communication
Computer Applications
Animal Science
Integrated Math III
Introduction Veterinary Science
Biology / AP Biology
Accounting I & II
AP Environmental Science
Chemistry / AP Chemistry
Personal Finance
Small Animal Care I & II
AP Physics I & II
Marketing I & II
Plant Science
AP US Government and Politics
Construction Courses
Economics
Agriculture Cooperative Education
World Language

 

Architecture & Construction

Written Communication
AP Physics I & II
AP 2-D Design Portfolio
AP US Government and Politics
Integrated Math III
Home and Interior Design
Introduction to Engineering Design
Economics
Marketing I & II
Principles of Engineering
AP Statistics
Construction Courses
Civil Engineering
AP Environmental Science
Digital Electronics
Architectural Design
Business and Marketing Courses
Drawing I & II
Chemistry / AP Chemistry
World Language

 

Arts, A/V Technology & Communications

Advanced Studio Art Courses
Concert Band
AP Chemistry
Ceramics I
Jazz Band
Integrated Math III
Sculpture
Orchestra
Introduction to Journalism
Drawing I & II
Choir
Newspaper
Photography
English 10 – Honors
Personal Finance
Web Design
Oral Communication
Exploring Business/Marketing
Game Design
AP English Literature & Composition
Digital Electronics
AP US Government and Politics
Creative Writing
Fashion and Design
World Language
Computer Programming I & II
Graphic & Electronic Communications Courses

Business Management & Administration

Exploring Business/Marketing
Business Communications
Economics
Accounting I & II
Sports Entertainment Marketing
Integrated Math III
Introduction to Law
TC Marketing Education I & II
Biology / AP Biology
International Business
Junior/Senior Internship
Chemistry / AP Chemistry
Personal Finance
Business COOP
AP US Government and Politics
Computer Applications
Written Communication
Psychology / AP Psychology
Digital Media & Design
Finance and Investing
AP Statistics
World Language

Education & Training

Child Development
Art Courses
World Language
Assistant Childcare Teacher
Psychology / AP Psychology
Written Communication
Aspiring Educators
Sociology
Oral Communication
Parenting
Humanities A & B
AP US Government and Politics
Computer Applications
AP English Language & Composition
United States History / AP US History
Digital Media & Design
AP English Literature & Composition
Integrated Math III
AP Statistics
Biology / AP Biology
Chemistry / AP Chemistry
AP Physics I & II
Economics
Personal Finance

 

Finance

Introduction to Law
Personal Finance
Pre-Calculus – Honors
Exploring Business/Marketing
Business COOP
AP Calculus AB / AP Calculus BC
Marketing I & II
Economics
Written Communication
Accounting I & II
Sociology
AP English Literature & Composition
Computer Applications
Psychology / AP Psychology
World Language
Digital Media & Design
AP US Government and Politics
AP Statistics
Business Communications
Integrated Math III
International Business
Finance and Investing

 

Government & Public Administration

International Business
AP US Government and Politics
Oral Communication
Accounting I & II
AP United States History
Written Communication
Business Communications
Sociology
AP English Literature & Composition
Computer Applications
Economics
Biology / AP Biology
Digital Media & Design
Humanities A / B
Chemistry / AP Chemistry
Exploring Business/Marketing
Psychology / AP Psychology
AP Physics I & II
Personal Finance
AP Environmental Science
World Language
Business COOP
AP Statistics
Finance and Investing

Health Science

Health Occupations
Medical Microbiology
Sociology
Biology / AP Biology
Animal Science
Child Development
Anatomy and Physiology I & II
Health Occupations
Parenting
AP Environmental Science
Certified Nursing Assistant
Written Communication
Chemistry / AP Chemistry
Computer Applications
Oral Communication
World Language
Psychology / AP Psychology
Personal Finance
Genetics I & II

 

Hospitality & Tourism

Business Communications
Computer Applications
AP Statistics
Marketing I & II
Digital Media & Design
Photography
Foods Courses
International Business
Web Design
Oral Communication
Economics
World Language
Personal Finance

Human Services

Family Dynamics
Genetics I & II
Psychology / AP Psychology
Child Development
Computer Applications
Contemporary Issues
Parenting
Introduction to Law
Health and Wellness
Accounting I & II
Art I
Lifetime Health and Fitness
Health Occupations
World Language
Anatomy and Physiology I & II
Sociology

Information Technology

Computer Applications
AP Computer Science A – JAVA
Digital Art
Application Development
Digital Media & Design
AP Statistics
Computer Programming I & II
Game Design
Digital Electronics
World Language
Art I
Introduction to Engineering
Graphic & Electronic Communication
Robotics, Engineering & Programming
Animation Art

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

Sociology
Genetics I & II
Economics
Psychology / AP Psychology
Oral Communication
Family Dynamics
Contemporary Issues
Forensic Science
Child Development
Introduction to Law
Anatomy and Physiology I & II
Parenting
World Language
AP US Government and Politics

Manufacturing

Manufacturing Courses
Principles of Engineering
Health Occupations
Welding
Digital Electronics
AP Environmental Science
Welding Fabrication
Music Technology
AP Physics I & II
Introduction to Engineering Design
Robotics, Engineering & Programming
Intro to Mechatronics

Marketing

Marketing I & II
Business Communications
Photography
Accounting I & II
International Business
Digital Art
Computer Applications
Web Design
Graphic & Electronic Communications
Digital Media & Design
Sports and Entertainment Marketing
Media Communications
AP Statistics
Art I
Economics
Sociology
World Language
Psychology / AP Psychology
Contemporary Issues

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Introduction to Engineering Design
Physics / AP Physics
Digital Art
Principles of Engineering
Manufacturing Courses
Photography
Digital Electronics
Transportation Courses
Computer Programming I & II
Architectural Engineering
Art I
Application Development
Civic Engineering
Economics
Web Design
Aerospace Engineering
AP Statistics
Robotics, Engineering & Programming
Graphic & Electronic Communications Courses

Transportation Distribution & Logistics

Transportation Courses
Physics / AP Physics
World Language
Manufacturing Courses
Art I
Oral Communication
Welding
Economics
Robotics, Engineering & Programming


NEW COURSES FOR 2019-2020


The following courses are new for the 2018-2019 academic year. The courses are listed by subject and then by course title. For further information on these courses, refer to the page listed.

 

Business and Marketing    
  Computer Applications II Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
  Digital Media & Design Grades: 10, 11, 12
Family and Consumer Sciences    
  AS Culinary Arts III ProStart Grades: 10, 11, 12
Mathematics    
  AS College Mathematics Grades: 11, 12
  Integrated Math I Honors Grade: 9
  Accelerated Math II Honors Grades: 10, 11, 12
  AS Introductory Statistics Grades: 11, 12
Music    
  Percussion Fundamentals Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Science    
  Medical Interventions Grades: 11, 12
Technology Education    
  Introduction to Mechatronic Systems Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12

FOUR-YEAR PLAN


Information necessary to map out a four-year plan is found in this High School Course Selection Handbook. Information is also available from teachers or school counselors, or in conferences held with staff members during course selection.

Download  Planer Here

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

FRESHMAN SEMINAR
Grades: 9
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 754021

Content: Freshman Seminar is a required course for all 9th grade students. Study skills, self-advocacy and college and career readiness will be areas of focus, as well as other skills that are necessary to be successful in the high school setting. In addition, students in Freshman Seminar will use Career Cruising, a program that will help students develop a four-year educational plan for high school that aligns with their post-secondary goals. This class is required for graduation starting with the class of 2018.

SEMINAR
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 754121

Content: Seminar is intended for students in grades 10 – 12 who have not met the Freshman Seminar requirement. Study skills, self-advocacy and leadership will be areas of focus; as well as other skills that are necessary to be successful in the high school setting. In addition, students in Seminar will use Career Cruising, a program that will help students develop a four-year educational plan for high school that aligns with their post-secondary goals.

INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 754421 and/or Semester B: 754422

Content: International Seminar is intended for students in grades 10-12 who are interested in enhancing their global competency and, in some cases, pursuing the Global Education Achievement Certificate. The course is also intended for F1, tuition-paying international students to fulfill the Freshman Seminar graduation requirement (this course does not replace the Freshman Seminar requirement for Janesville resident, non-immigrant students). As with Freshman Seminar, study skills, self-advocacy, and leadership will be areas of focus with a special emphasis on global competency. Additionally, students will develop or continue to refine a high school educational plan that aligns with their post-secondary goals in this course. Janesville residents and F1, tuition-paying students will benefit from cross cultural sharing as a fundamental outcome of this course.

LEADERSHIP SKILLS
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 753021
And/or Semester B: 753022

Content: The goal of this course is to develop skills in the following areas: team and climate building, organization, leadership, communication, facilitation, as well as personal reflection and prioritizing. Students can expect to develop leadership skills in project planning and execution that requires communication, creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration. Projects will be related to school improvement and provide students with the opportunity to act on their opinions/issues in our community.

PERSONAL FINANCE
Grades: 11
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 750121
Or Semester B: 750122

Content: This course is designed to equip high school students with the knowledge and skills necessary to manage their personal finances effectively. Students will learn “Real Life” skills, which they can use throughout their own lives. Students will learn about investing in a variety of securities (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, etc.). Other topics covered include: careers, post-secondary planning, financial aid, college applications, analyzing pay and benefits, taxes, budgeting, use of banking services, real estate, credit, buying an automobile, buying a home and insurance. In addition, students will use Career Cruising, a program that will help them develop a four-year educational plan for high school that aligns with their post-secondary goals.

TECH SQUAD
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Instructor Consent
Course Number: Semester A: 753011
Or Semester B: 753012

Content: Do you have an interest in helping your teachers and fellow classmates as well as the School District of Janesville (SDJ) move forward with innovative technology approaches to teaching and learning? Students will take on a leadership role among their peers in offering a fresh perspective towards integrating technology in the classroom. Tech Squad students will have the opportunity to offer their services to staff members and student groups who are in need of technology tools and resources. They should be willing to try new things and seek out new opportunities for learning.


AGRICULTURE SCIENCES

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Agriculture Cooperative Education (A.C.E.)     E E
TC Animal Science (ES) R R R R
AP Environmental Science   R R R
Equines and Exotics (Alternate Year 2020-21)   E E E
Field Study in Wildlife Ecology   E E E
Introduction to Agriculture E E E E
Introduction to Veterinary Science (ES)   R R R
Landscape Design and Greenhouse Production (Alternate Year 2020-21) E E E E
Large Animal Care (Alternate Year 2019-20) E E E E
TC Plant Science (ES) R R R R
Small Animal Care and Management I E E E E
Small Animal Care and Management II E E E E
Veterinary Science Procedures     E E
Wildlife Ecology   E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level

R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level

AP = Advanced Placement

AS = Advanced Standing

EM = Equivalent Mathematics

ES = Equivalent Science

TC = Transcripted Credit

MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering

PLTW = Project Lead the Way

* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (A.C.E)
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Currently enrolled in an agriculture class
Course Number: 629620

Content: Students who have an agribusiness career objective in mind, or who would like to explore an agribusiness career and enter the work force upon graduation from high school, may be interested in this program. Students will be placed on a job site based upon their interest. For this work experience, students will receive one hour of school released time for job training. Students will take part in FFA career development activities. Students must be enrolled in Agriculture class to enroll in this course.

 

BLACKHAWK TECHNICAL COLEGE LOGO

TC ANIMAL SCIENCE ES
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 621521
Or Semester B: 621522

Content: This course is designed to give students an advanced knowledge of production animals and the science that is surrounding the industry. Students will learn about the structural functions of reproduction, digestion, nervous, muscular and endocrine systems. Students will gain an understanding of technical areas such as growth hormones, artificial insemination, embryo transfer, heat synchronization, and cloning to improve efficient livestock production. Science based inquiry, group collaboration in problem solving, and hands-on laboratories activities will be included. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities.
This course is also offered under Science.

 

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I and 2.0 credits of Science and/or Agriculture
Course Number: 623230

Content: AP Environmental Science will provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.
This course is also offered under Science.

EQUINES & EXOTICS
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credits: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Small Animal Care and Management I or Animal Science
(Alternate Year 2020-21)
Course Number: Semester A: 623321
Or Semester B: 623322

Content: Equine & Exotics opens up a whole new animal world to students. In this course students will explore the anomalies of the animal world as they learn about habitats, diet, and adaptations animals have from land to sea and sky. Half of the course will explore equine, and half the course will explore exotics. In the exotic portion of the class students will explore how isolation and adaptations have made it easier for some species to survive. They will touch on the theory of evolution and will discuss differentiation between species. Students will cross all the biomes and compare how their habitat determines their survival. In the equine portion of the class students will examine the history and future of the horse. We will uncover the complex history of an animal that has been used throughout its history in a wide variety of functions. Students will look in-depth at breeds, uses, anatomy, physiology, recreation, care, diseases, management, and current issues that horses face today. Horses may be used for actual labs to demonstrate digestion, tacking, anatomy, health care, and other such uses.

FIELD STUDY IN WILDLIFE ECOLOGY
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 623221
Or Semester B: 623222

Content: This course examines how America’s resources provide aesthetic, scientific, recreational and economic benefits. Units of study include the principles of habitat, human impact on habitat, wildlife and waterfowl management, ducks, songbirds, avian predators, shorebirds, reptiles, amphibians, and careers in wildlife and fishery management. Laboratory skills that are ideal for hunters, outdoor enthusiasts, taxidermists and environmentalists alike will be taught. Students are encouraged to participate in FFA activities including the Wildlife Ecology Career Development Event.

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 621021
Or Semester B: 621022

Content: This introductory course will acquaint students with the broad field of agriculture. The student will explore career clusters such as agriculture production; pet/pleasure animals and crops; natural resources including soil, air, water, forestry, and wildlife; and the production and processing of meats, fruits, vegetables, and dairy products. Horticultural science, including greenhouse, nursery and landscape/turf, will be covered as well as agribusiness sales and marketing and agriculture in government. FFA and agricultural leadership opportunities are recommended and will be provided. Resource speakers, field trips and hands-on activities will be included. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities.

INTRODUCTION TO VETERINARY SCIENCE (ES)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Completion of Small Animal Care & Management I or TC Animal Science ES
Course Number: Semester A: 622021
Or Semester B: 622022

Content: This course is designed for students who have a sincere interest in a career related to small animals. Students planning to become a veterinarian, small animal technician, animal scientist, or animal researcher, then this course is highly recommended. Topics to be discussed include medical terminology, anatomy, careers, safety, health, reproduction, scientific research and animal welfare. Each student will complete hands on veterinary skills including weighing an animal, diagnosis and administering a treatment, cleaning, clipping, grooming, and practicing mock surgery procedures. A school or community animal awareness project will be developed and facilitated through the course. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities.
This course is also offered under Science.

LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND GREENHOUSE PRODUCTION
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
(Alternate Year 2020-21)
Course Number: Semester A: 623521
Or Semester B: 623522

Content: In this course the students will learn how trees, shrubs, and other plant materials are grown and cared for. They will draw and price complete landscape plans using the principles of landscape architecture. They will understand the skills and practices needed to grow flowers, vegetables and other plants in a greenhouse. Lawns, turf management, and other horticulture related occupations and careers will be discussed. Computer aided designs will be generated to reflect complete landscape design, cost estimates and materials. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities.

LARGE ANIMAL CARE
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Animal Science
(Alternate Year 2019-20)
Course Number: Semester A: 621921
Or Semester B: 621922

Content: This course is designed to give students advanced knowledge of large farm animals. The production animals that will be covered will include dairy, beef, swine, poultry, sheep, and goats. This course will provide an understanding of breeds, animal health, nutrition, anatomy and physiology, training, and judging of each animal. Students will learn information, knowledge, and skills associated with careers in animal production and animal science. This curriculum provides laboratory, lecture, and hand on activities. Students will learn through classroom discussions, demonstrations, notes, lectures, and experiments. Student self-guided learning using technology will be incorporated into the course. Guest speakers and field trips to businesses will be utilized when appropriate for the lessons. Laboratory activities relating to each of the species will be incorporated into the course work. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities.

BTC LOGO

TC PLANT SCIENCE ES
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None - Introduction to Agriculture recommended.
Course Number: Semester B: 621622

Content: Students will study the processes involved in plant growth, production and reproduction. The functions of plant structures, as well as crop production, will also be studied. Genetic improvement of plants, plant diseases, plant cultural practices and harvest of crops will be explored in detail. There will be various identifications of crops, weeds and seeds. Students will work in the school greenhouse to complete lab activities. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities.
This course is also offered under Science.

SMALL ANIMAL CARE AND MANAGEMENT I
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 621721
Or Semester B: 621722

Content: This course is for students who enjoy domestic animals and want to learn more about the small animal industry and related careers. Animals discussed include dogs, cats, rabbits, small rodents, and other pet and laboratory animals. Topics discussed include safety, feeding, training, animal rights and welfare, anatomy, reproduction, health, behavior, housing, and equipment needed for care. Students will be working with animals in the classroom, which will enhance the course materials. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities.

SMALL ANIMAL CARE AND MANAGEMENT II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 621821
Or Semester B: 621822

Content: This course will cover the classification, history, characteristics, housing and equipment, feeding, handling, diseases and ailments, and reproduction of the following species; ferrets, chinchillas, birds, fish, amphibians, reptiles, and exotic pets. Students will learn through classroom discussions, demonstrations, notes, lectures, and experiments. Guest speakers and field trips to businesses, research labs, and veterinarian offices will be used when appropriate for the lessons. Laboratory activities relating to each of the species will be incorporated into the course work. Students will handle and care for small animals. Students will be working with animals in the classroom, which will enhance the course materials. An animal welfare and career project will be

VETERINARY SCIENCE PROCEDURES
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Introduction to Veterinary Science ES or Instructor Consent
Course Number: Semester A: 622121
Or Semester B: 622122

Content: This course incorporates the concepts and knowledge of basic veterinary science techniques and puts them in to practice. Laboratory skills that are ideal for students interested in the veterinary science field or medical field will be taught. Students are guided through different real life case studies related to large and small animals. Students will participate in FFA activities including the Vet Science Career Development Event.

WILDLIFE ECOLOGY
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 623121
Or Semester B: 623122

Content: This course examines how America’s resources provide aesthetic, scientific, recreational and economic benefits. Units of study include the principles of fish and wildlife management, ecology, history of wildlife management, small game, big game, fur bearing animals, fish management, game laws and issues, endangered and threatened species, and aquaculture. Students will take part in FFA activities.


ARTS

Arts. A/V Technology & Communications

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Advanced Studio: Animation (Parker HS Only)*   E E E
Advanced Studio: Art Metals *   E E E
Advanced Studio: Ceramics *   E E E
Advanced Studio: Digital Art *   E E E
Advanced Studio: Drawing *   E E E
Advanced Studio: Experimental Art (Parker HS Only)*   E E E
Advanced Studio: Painting *   E E E
Advanced Studio: Photography *   E E E
Advanced Studio: Sculpture *   E E E
Animation Art (Parker HS Only) *   E E E
AP Drawing *     E E
AP 2-D Design Portfolio *     E E
AP 3-D Design Portfolio *     E E
Art I * E E E E
Art Metals *   E E E
Ceramics * E E E E
Digital Art I *   E E E
Digital Art II *   E E E
Drawing I * E E E E
Drawing II * E E E E
Experimental Art (Parker HS Only) *     E E
History Through Art I (Parker HS Only) E E E E
History Through Art II (Parker HS Only) E E E E
Painting *   E E E
Photography *   E E E
Sculpture *   E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

 

ADVANCED STUDIO: ANIMATION *
(Parker HS Only)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: Animation Art
Course Number: Semester A: 643521
And/or Semester B: 643522

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest for animation. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their skills in a variety of animation techniques through the exploration of character development and animation production. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

ADVANCED STUDIO: ART METALS *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: Art Metals
Course Number: Semester A: 642221

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest in art metals. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their design and technical skills in art metals through the advanced exploration of metal as a medium. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

ADVANCED STUDIO: CERAMICS *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Ceramics
Course Number: 641320

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest in ceramic arts. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their design and technical skills in ceramic arts through the advances exploration of clay as a 3-dimensional medium. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

ADVANCED STUDIO: DIGITAL ART *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: Digital Art I & Digital Art II
Course Number: Semester A: 643321
And/or Semester B: 643322

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest in digital art technology. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their skills in a variety of digital art techniques. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

ADVANCED STUDIO: DRAWING *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: Drawing I and Drawing II
Course Number: Semester A: 640421
And/or Semester B: 640422

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest in drawing. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their skills in technical aspects and creativity in drawing and media exploration through a 2-dimensional medium. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

ADVANCED STUDIO: EXPERIMENTAL ART * (Parker HS Only)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: Experimental Art
Course Number: Semester A: 647221
And/or Semester B: 647222

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest in experimental art. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their skills in exploration, experimentation, and construction in media exploration through 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional mediums. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

ADVANCED STUDIO: PAINTING *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Painting
Course Number: 644220

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest in painting. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their skills and creativity in painting and media exploration. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

ADVANCED STUDIO: PHOTOGRAPHY *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: Photography
Course Number: Semester A: 645221
And/or Semester B: 645222

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest in photography. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their technical skills and creativity in traditional and non-traditional photographic experiences. This course option may be repeated for additional elective credits.

ADVANCED STUDIO: SCULPTURE *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Sculpture
Course Number: Semester B: 646222

Content: Designed for students with a passion and interest in sculpture. This course offers an opportunity for the self-motivated artist to advance their design and technical skills in sculptural arts through the advanced exploration of 3-dimensional mediums as an art form. This course option may be repeated for additional elective credits.

ANIMATION ART *(Parker HS Only)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Drawing I & Drawing II,
or Art 1 or Senior Status
Course Number: Semester A: 643421
Or Semester B: 643422

Content: Using acquired drawing skills, students will create original characters and original storyboards using a variety of animation techniques. Students will develop, draw and bring a character to life using various animation techniques. Students will go behind the scenes to discover how Disney and Pixar Studios create and produce their favorite movies. Advanced Studio-Animation can be taken multiple times after successfully completing Animation.

AP DRAWING *
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Drawing I, Drawing II or Instructor Consent
Course Number: 640520

Content: The AP Drawing class enables highly motivated students to do college-level work in Studio Art while still in high school. The AP exam for this course is not based on a written examination; instead, students must submit a portfolio of work for evaluation at the end of the school year. Guidelines for the AP Drawing Studio Art Portfolios have been designed to encompass a variety of interests and approaches to drawing.

AP 2-D DESIGN PORTFOLIO *
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Art I and a 2-D Art course or Instructor Consent
Course Number: 649120

Content: This course requires students to complete a portfolio of art that can be submitted as the AP Exam and/or art scholarship requirements. 2-D Design students work with a variety of graphic mediums emphasizing compositional elements of design. Students will produce 12 breadth category works showing experimentation with a wide variety of mediums and subject matter. Students will produce 12 areas of concentration works demonstrating a body of related works. In addition, students submit 5 quality works.

AP 3-D DESIGN PORTFOLIO *
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Art I and a 3-D Art course or Instructor Consent
Course Number: 649220

Content: This course requires students to complete a portfolio of art that can be submitted as the AP Exam and/or art scholarship requirements. Breadth category requirements include ceramics, sculpture, metals, fiber, found and assemblage works. Area of concentration can be any or a combination of 3-D media, which follow a student’s chosen area of interest. Students will produce 8 breadth category works showing experimentation with a wide variety of mediums and subject matter. Students will produce 12 areas of concentration works demonstrating a body of related works. In addition, students submit 5 quality works.

ART I *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 640120

Content: This is an introductory course that is a prerequisite for all other art courses except Ceramics I, and Drawing I. Students will learn how to apply the art elements and design principles to original works of art in drawing, painting, printmaking, digital art, art metals, ceramics and sculpture.

ART METALS *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Art I or Senior Status
Course Number: Semester A: 642121

Content: Students will learn to design and shape wires, metals, and related materials into jewelry, sculpture, and constructions. Students will learn jewelry castings, and stone setting. Students will use basic metal-forming techniques of cutting, sawing, soldering, filing, drilling, hammering and finishing. Students will apply the elements and principles of design to objects made from metal.

CERAMICS *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester: 641120

Content: Students will learn the basic forms of clay construction working with coil and slab construction. They will be introduced to the potter’s wheel, and various techniques for surface decorations will be demonstrated and explored. Students will create both functional pottery and nonfunctional sculptural clay forms. Students will critique ceramic works of art and research ceramic artists and movements in the history of ceramics.

DIGITAL ART I *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Art I or Senior Status
Course Number: Semester A: 643121

Content: Students will create original artwork using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator drawing and design software. A variety of digital drawing, illustration and design techniques will be explored and applied to original artwork using the elements and principles of design. Student may continue their exploration of digital art technology in Digital Art II.

DIGITAL ART II *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Digital Art I or Senior Status
Course Number: Semester B: 643222

Content: Using skills acquired in Digital Art I, students will create original graphic design imagery – designs that visually communicate – using more advanced Photoshop and Illustrator techniques. Students will become familiar with current digital terminology, technology and equipment. Advanced Studio – Digital Art can be taken multiple times after successfully completing Digital Art II.

DRAWING I *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 640221
And Semester B: 640222

Content: Students will learn the basic skills and techniques of drawing in black and white media. Students will learn how to use and apply the design elements - line, value, texture and perspective – to express the principles of art in their work. Students will draw a variety of subject matter with a variety of materials.

DRAWING II *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Drawing I
Course Number: Semester A: 640321
And Semester B: 640322

Content: Students continue to apply the basic drawing skills and techniques they learned in Drawing I to more complex and difficult subject matter including color. Students will continue to work with a variety of materials. Advanced Studio-Drawing can be taken multiple times after successfully completing Drawing II.

EXPERIMENTAL ART * (Parker HS Only)
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 and 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: Art I and any additional Art course
Course Number: Semester A: 647121
And/or Semester B: 647122

Content: Unusual materials, techniques and processes will challenge students to apply their art skills to the creation of original artwork. Students will explore and experiment with the design and construction of hand-made drawing and painting tools, alternative book-making methods and various printmaking techniques. Claybord and mixed-media assemblage. This course is highly recommended for students wanting a unique art experience and to add breadth to their AP portfolios. Advanced Studio-Experimental Art can be taken multiple times after successfully completing Experimental Art.

HISTORY THROUGH ART I (Parker HS Only)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 648121
Or Semester B: 648122

Content: History Through Art I will allow students to study world history from Prehistory to the Middle Ages through the study of the major paintings, sculptures and architecture of those times. Students will participate in discussions/activities comparing and contrasting both Western and non-Western art. Civilizations, religions and political and social events will be studied as related to the emergence of new forms and movements in art. Students have the option to take this class and History Through Art II as prerequisites to AP Art History.
This course is also offered under Social Studies.

HISTORY THROUGH ART II (Parker HS Only)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 648221
Or Semester B: 648222
Content: History Through Art II will allow students to study world history from the Renaissance to the Modern Era through the study of the major paintings, sculptures and architecture of those times. Students will participate in discussions/activities comparing and contrasting both Western and Non-western art. Civilizations, religions and political and social events will be studied as related to the emergence of new forms and movements in art. Students have the option to take this class and History Through Art I as prerequisites to AP Art History.
This course is also offered under Social Studies.

PAINTING *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Art I or Senior Status
Course Number: 644120

Content: Students will express their ideas in various painting techniques and mediums. They will use the elements and principles of design to create sound compositions. Students will learn about major artists and art movements and learn to appreciate various styles of painting. It is highly recommended to take a drawing course. Advanced -Studio-Painting can be taken multiple times after successfully completing Painting.

PHOTOGRAPHY *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Art I or Senior Status
Course Number: Semester A: 645121
Or Semester B: 645122

Content: Students will apply Art I skills to photography. Primary attention is directed at understanding artistic composition and the important role it plays in producing quality visual imagery. Students will demonstrate proficiency in processes connected with planning, taking, and developing black and white photographs. In addition, a variety of special techniques will be taught that extend creativity and design options. Advanced Studio-Photography can be taken multiple times after successfully completing Photography.

SCULPTURE *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Art I or Senior Status
Course Number: Semester B: 646122

Content: Students will explore, design and construct sculpture as an art form. Using various sculpture techniques students will learn how to apply methods to achieve desired results. Various materials and found objects will be used. Students will apply their learned knowledge in a large individual or group sculpture for possible installation.


BUSINESS and MARKETING

Business Management & Administration ~ Finance ~ Information Technology ~ Marketing

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
AS Accounting I   E E E
AS Accounting II     E E
Business Communications     E E
Business COOP     E E
Computer Applications I E E E E
Computer Applications II E E E E
Digital Media & Design   E E E
Entrepreneurship     E E
AS Exploring Business/Marketing E E    
Finance and Investing     E E
International Business     E E
Introduction to Law     E E
Keyboarding E E E E
Marketing Education I   E E E
TC Marketing Education II     E E
Marketing Education COOP     E E
Personal Finance     R  
Sports and Entertainment Marketing     E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

 

BTC LOGO

AS ACCOUNTING I
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 662120

Content: Knowledge of accounting is important to all areas of business and finance. Career opportunities for people with accounting backgrounds are rapidly increasing and expanding. In this course, students learn and apply the basics of accounting principles and procedures to complete the accounting cycle. In addition to completing the basic accounting forms, students will also learn how to use computer software to complete accounting records. During the fourth quarter, students will get on-the-job experience by completing an accounting simulation. This course is a must for students who are pursuing a degree in business or a business-related major at a post-secondary school or for those wanting to learn how to keep a record system for personal use. Students will also gain extensive experience using Microsoft Excel.

BTC LOGO

AS ACCOUNTING II
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Accounting I
Course Number: 662220

Content: This course will build on the knowledge gained in the AS Accounting I course and provide them with a solid understanding of corporate accounting practices. Students will be able to analyze transactions and prepare various corporate financial reports. Students will also gain practical experience working with dividends, plant assets, depreciation, accrued revenue and expenses, retained earnings, stockholders’ equity, and more. Students will continue to develop their skills in Microsoft Excel.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester B: 665122

Content: This business course provides students the opportunity to develop the skills and attitudes necessary for success in the business world. The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of communication skills, current technology, and its impact on college and career readiness. Competencies will be developed in the areas of verbal and written communications, interpersonal skills, and the use of current technology including social media.

BUSINESS COOP
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Previously taken a business class. Instructor Consent
Course Number: 667120

Content: In this course, students work in a local business to gain supervised business experience in a field related to his/her career objective. Students are trained and evaluated by the employer. Students receive school credit as well as wages for employment. Students are given release time to work in the afternoon. Examples of employers are: law offices, insurance companies, real estate offices, banks, dental offices, or any other office/business. It is recommended that students be enrolled in a coordinating business class.
*2nd year COOP students must work towards a state skills certificate in one of the business areas.
COOP requirements include: weekly work logs and quarterly employer completed evaluations.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 661321
Or Semester B: 661322

Content: Computer Applications I is a semester course where students will learn to apply computer software and technology. Students will achieve a working knowledge of Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, and File Management, as they learn how to format documents and complete projects. Successful completion of Computer Applications I and II will lead to MOS Certification (Microsoft Office Specialist) which demonstrates a nationally recognized employability skill
This course is also offered under Computer Science.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Computer Applications I
Course Number: Semester A: 661351
Or Semester B: 661352

Content: Computer Applications II is a semester course where students apply
computer software and technology. Students will learn advanced features of Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, and Microsoft Publisher. Students will integrate all programs in Microsoft Office Suite to prepare documents and complete projects. Successful completion of Computer Applications I and II will lead to MOS Certification (Microsoft Office Specialist) which demonstrates a nationally recognized employability skill.
This course is also offered under Computer Science.

DIGITAL MEDIA & DESIGN
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Computer Applications II
Course Number: Semester A: 661421
Or Semester B: 661422

Content: Digital Media & Design is a one semester class. Students will create and produce digital design layouts and visual communications projects (logos, ads, brochures, magazines, newsletters, and posters) using Adobe In-Design, Spark, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Microsoft Publisher. A variety of video creation software for multimedia, movies and the web will complete this course.
This course is also offered under Computer Science.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: AS Accounting I or Marketing I
Course Number: 660330

Content: Entrepreneurship is a leading factor in driving the global economy. In this class, students will learn the entrepreneurial process and the operations of a business. Students will develop an innovative idea and create a business plan. The entrepreneurs of today and tomorrow must understand how a competitive marketplace operates, as well as comprehend production, marketing, finance, human resources, social environment, and legal issues. Communication skills, initiative, creativity, and problem solving techniques are instrumental to success in the class.

BTC LOGO

AS EXPLORING BUSINESS/MARKETING
Grades: 9, 10
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 660121
Or Semester B: 660122

Content: This semester course gives students a general overview of the world of business. This introductory level course allows students a chance to get a taste of other business and marketing courses offered at the high school level. Students will explore different topics involving economics, business management, accounting, personal finance, maintaining a checkbook, basic budgeting, ethics, business communications, entrepreneurship, and other business-related careers. Students will understand why business-related majors are one of the most popular in post-secondary education today.

FINANCE AND INVESTING
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Personal Finance
Course Number: 750210

Content: Do you want to learn how to invest money to retire earlier, travel the world, or buy your dream car? These are a few of the things that successful investors can accomplish. According to a Transamerica survey, 72 percent of millenials say they do not think they know enough about investing! In Finance and Investing you’ll learn the skills it takes to become a better investor. You will also develop the skills and abilities to conduct financial analyses for companies that help shape the decisions each and every company makes.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 664121

Content: This course will provide a foundation for becoming informed about the global business environment. Students will cover topics related to international business and their impact on society. Students will learn about advancements in the global economy through trade, marketing, and entrepreneurship. Students will enhance their understanding of International Business through studying real-life business examples.

INTRODUCTION TO LAW
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 663121
Or Semester B: 663122

Content: Introduction to Law is a business and personal-use law course covering the subjects of crimes, torts, court procedures and other legal topics. Students will learn about law enforcement and the courts, criminal law, civil law, contract law, consumer law, personal property law, legalities of renting an apartment, and the legalities of purchasing a vehicle. Guest speakers from the community will also visit the class to share their expertise in these areas.

KEYBOARDING
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 661121
Or Semester B: 661122

Content: Keyboarding is designed for students to learn how to touch type on the computer keyboard. Using proper finger placement and technique, students will develop their skill, speed, and accuracy to an employable level. Students will use Microsoft Word to format personal and business letters, tables, memos, and reports that will enhance their performance in school, in their personal lives, and in their careers. Previous keyboarding experience is not required.

MARKETING EDUCATION I 
Branding, Product Development, Social Media
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 660220

Content: This course provides students insight into business and the world of marketing through a sound foundation of marketing principles. Units covered in this course include Economics, all aspects of Marketing, the Selling Process, Product Planning & Development, Promotion, Social Media, Channels of Distribution, and Pricing Strategies. Materials used for instruction are all from the real world of business. Student leadership development and employment skills are integrated into this class through our co-curricular organization, DECA.

BTC LOGO

TC MARKETING EDUCATION II – Management, Market Research, Digital Marketing
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Marketing Education I – Branding, Product Development, & Social Media
Course Number: 660320

Content: This course is for students who have successfully completed TC Marketing Education I – Branding, Product Development and Social Media. Students will have the opportunity to operate our school store in cooperation with this class. An emphasis is placed on discussion of business/job related problems and successful problem–solving techniques. Units covered include Economics, Principles of Management, Marketing Information Management, Risk Management, Digital Marketing, and introductory units of Entrepreneurship and Sports & Entertainment Marketing. Student leadership development and employment skills are integrated into this class through our co-curricular organization, DECA.

MARKETING EDUCATION COOP
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Previously taken a marketing class. Instructor Consent & application required.
Course Number: 667220

Content: Students work in the community in a job related to business or marketing. Students receive school credit and wages for employment. A major emphasis is placed on learning about the operation of a business, exploring business as a career and working with common problems faced in the world of work. Students will commit to working at the job the full year. Students must be enrolled in a coordinating marketing class as determined by the instructor.
*2nd year COOP students must work towards a state skills certificate in one of the marketing areas.
COOP requirements include: weekly work logs and quarterly employer completed evaluations.

PERSONAL FINANCE
Grades: 11
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 750121
Or Semester B: 750122

Content: This course is designed to equip high school students with the knowledge and skills necessary to manage their personal finances effectively. Students will learn “Real Life” skills, which they can use throughout their own lives. Students will learn about investing in a variety of securities (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, etc.). Other topics covered include: careers, post-secondary planning, financial aid, college applications, analyzing pay and benefits, taxes, budgeting, use of banking services, real estate, credit, buying an automobile, buying a home and insurance. In addition, students will use Career Cruising, a program that will help them develop a four-year educational plan for high school that aligns with their post-secondary goals.

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: TC Marketing Education I
Course Number: Semester A: 660421
Or Semester B: 660422

Content: This marketing course provides students with an opportunity to learn about two of the most profitable industries in the United States: Sports and Entertainment. This class is for students who have a desire to continue in marketing education. This course will review basic principles of marketing and economics as to how they relate to the sports and entertainment world. Topics covered include branding, licensing, sponsorship, promotion, advertising, selling, finance, distribution, and careers within the field. Students will have the opportunity to apply topics learned by running a sports franchise through a simulated computer program called Virtual Business-Sports. This program provides students with a real world learning experience in sports marketing.


COMPUTER SCIENCE

Information Technology

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
TC Advanced Computer Science AB – JAVA (EM) *     E/R E/R
AP Computer Science A – JAVA (EM)   E/R E/R E/R
AP Computer Science Principles (EM)   E/R E/R E/R
Application Development E E E E
Computer Applications I E E E E
Computer Applications II        
Computer Programming I (EM) E E E/R E/R
Computer Programming II (EM) E E E/R E/R
Digital Media & Design   E E E
Exploring Computer Science E E E E
Game Design I E E E E
Game Design II   E E E
Robotics, Engineering, and Programming E E E E
Web Design E E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

PIE LOGO

TC ADVANCED COMPUTER
SCIENCE AB – JAVA (EM) *
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: AP Computer Science A - JAVA
Course Number: 684420

Content: This yearlong course is comparable to the second course in the introductory sequence for computer science majors in college. Advanced Computer Science AB is intended to serve both as a second step for computer science majors and as a course for students who will major in other disciplines that require significant involvement with technology. JAVA is a platform independent language, and the programs students write will compile successfully on Macintosh or Windows operating systems. Upon completion of the course, students will have finished the equivalent of a second semester course in college computer science. Students will be responsible for paying for the tuition, which is about one third of the cost as an undergraduate (approximately $300).
This course is also offered under Mathematics.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A – JAVA (EM)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I
Course Number: 684320

Content: This yearlong course is comparable to the first course in the introductory sequence for computer science majors in college. An AP Computer Science A course is intended to serve both as an introductory course for computer science majors and as a course for students who will major in other disciplines that require significant involvement with technology. JAVA is a platform independent language and the programs students write will compile successfully on Macintosh or Windows operating systems. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.
This course is also offered under Mathematics.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES (EM)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I
Course Number: 684520

Content: This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cyber-security concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles will give students the opportunity to use technology to address real-world problems and build relevant solutions. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.
This course is also offered under Mathematics.

APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
Grades: 9, 10, 11 ,12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment or completion of Computer Programming I Course Number: Semester A: 682121
Or Semester B: 682122

Content: This course will introduce the development of mobile apps for the Android platform through MIT’s App Inventor, the Java programming language, and the IOS platform through XCode. Students will begin by learning the basics of the app inventor and then apply those skills to labs that will create applications that can be launched on a mobile phone emulator and then on an actual mobile phone. As time permits, students will be able to generate their own ideas for apps and create apps that access phone features such as GPS and movement/acceleration.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 663121
Or Semester B: 663122

Content: Computer Applications is a semester course in which students will apply computer software and technology for problem solving in an information intensive society. Students will work on projects that stress the relationship of all subjects and careers to computers. The majority of the time will be spent learning the Microsoft Office suite. (MS Word, MS Excel, MS Access, MS PowerPoint, and MS Publisher). They will learn to integrate these programs to prepare documents and complete projects.
This course is also offered under Business and Marketing.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Computer Applications I
Course Number: Semester A: 661351
Or Semester B: 661352

Content: Computer Applications II is a semester course where students apply
computer software and technology. Students will learn with advanced features of Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, and Microsoft Publisher. Students will integrate all programs in Microsoft Office Suite to prepare documents and complete projects. Successful completion of Computer Applications I and II will lead to MOS Certification (Microsoft Office Specialist) which demonstrates a nationally recognized employability skill.
This course is also offered under Business and Marketing.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, I (EM)
Grades: 9, 10, 11 ,12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 681121
Or Semester B: 681122

Content: Computer Programming I is a beginning programming course. Students will learn a modern object orientated programming language that produces programs for Macintosh or Windows machines. Students will design programs that will include music, audio, movies, graphics and interactive real world applications. These projects will emphasize communication of ideas and information available to a wide range of student interests. This will allow for a smooth transition to other languages such as JAVA and C++. Topics include the use of algorithms and variables with decision and repeat structures.
This course is also offered under Mathematics.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING II (EM)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Computer Programming I
Course Number: Semester A: 681221
Or Semester B: 681222

Content: Computer Programming II is the advanced programming course which expands the computing knowledge and skills acquired in the Computer Programming I class. Students will learn advanced programming techniques. Multimedia projects will include the use of video and sound technologies. The emphasis will be on effective communication of ideas and information through high level programming strategies involving objects and classes. These strategies include control structures and the handling of numerical and word data through functions and classes.
This course is also offered under Mathematics.

DIGITAL MEDIA & DESIGN
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Computer Applications II
Course Number: Semester A: 661421
Or Semester B: 661422

Content: Digital Media & Design is a one semester class. Students will create and produce digital design layouts and visual communications projects (logos, ads, brochures, magazines, newsletters, and posters) using Adobe In-Design, Spark, Photoshop, and Illustrator, and Microsoft Publisher. A variety of video creation software for multimedia, movies and the web will complete this course.
This course is also offered under Business and Marketing.

EXPLORING COMPUTER SCIENCE
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 684530

Content: Exploring Computer Science is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be used to solve particular problems. The goal of Exploring Computer Science is to develop in students the computational practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers, and societal and ethical issues.

GAME DESIGN I
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Integrated Math II
Course Number: Semester A: 661331
Or Semester B: 661332

Content: The purpose of Game Design I is to expose students to the basic principles of creative design through computational thinking. In Game Design, students will play, and then learn how games “do that”. Along with the games, students will work through a variety of digital tutorials in Gamemaker Studio® so they can develop skills such as 3D mapping, collision, physics, animation, and other skills needed by the industry. The program will also introduce students to some basic and advanced scripting (computer programming). Going beyond the basics, this class will also plant the seeds of wonder for future programming classes and Game Design II.

GAME DESIGN II
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Game Design I and one other programming course
Course Number: Semester A: 661341
Or Semester B: 661342

Content: Game Design II will expand on the Game maker Studio knowledge by collaboratively creating two more complete games. In the second half of the course, students will tap into either Unity or Unreal game making engines.

ROBOTICS, ENGINEERING, AND PROGRAMMING
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 681320

Content: Robotics, Engineering, and Programming is an exciting class to allow students to feel comfortable with the new and sometimes very complicated concepts. To build an autonomous robot, students must learn the basic concepts of computer programming, design, electronics, engineering, and mechanics.

WEB DESIGN
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 683121
Or Semester B: 683122

Content: Web Design is a class designed to teach the components of web design and webpage creation for the Internet. Students will use both HTML and a webpage design software package called DreamWeaver. Students will learn to plan effective page designs. Time will be spent researching topics, planning web sites, and mastering web software. Individual projects will incorporate all of this with topics selected to reinforce interests and learning in other subject areas. Students will also develop web buttons, rollover images, and web animations that will be used on their web sites.


ENGLISH

Arts, A/V Technology, Health Science, Information Technology, Business Management & Administration, Hospitality & Tourism, Marketing, Education & Training, Human Services, Science Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

 

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Accelerated English 9-10 – Honors R      
Advanced Acting       E
AP English Language and Composition     R R
AP English Literature and Composition     R R
Creative Writing     R R
Diverse Contemporary Literature     R R
English 9 R      
English 9 – Honors R      
English 10   R    
English 10 – Honors   R    
English 11   R R  
English 11 – Honors   R R  
English 12       R
Filmmaking I E E E E
Filmmaking II E E E E
Introduction to Media & Journalism E E E E
Introduction to Theater and Acting E E E E
Literacy Strategies 9 E      
Literacy Strategies 10   E    
Literacy Strategies 11     E  
Multi-Media Production   E E E
Newspaper E E E E
Novel Studies     R R
AS Oral Communication     R R
Reading Strategies I E E E E
Reading Strategies II   E E E
Science Fiction and Fantasy     R R
Social Justice: The Power of Choice & Voice!     E/R E/R
AS Written Communication     R R
Yearbook   E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
*There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

ACCELERATED ENGLISH 9-10 – HONORS
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 501010

Content: This yearlong course is for students who are especially committed to challenging their reading and writing skills as this course takes students on a journey through English 9 and English 10 curriculum. Following completion of this course, students will enroll in English 11 Honors during their sophomore year. Students will experience an increased level of written and oral analysis of literature, informational text, drama and poetry. Non-fiction selections will be used to prompt writing and extend the study of issues and themes. It is expected that students will be able to read independently. Students who register for this course are proficient or advanced writers and readers and will continue to develop those skills.

ADVANCED ACTING
Grade: 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Introduction to Theater and Acting
Course Number: Semester A: 506021
Or Semester B: 506022

Content: Advanced Acting explores in greater depth the topics and techniques from Introduction to Theater and Acting, with a greater focus on performing one-act & full-length plays.
The course begins with a review of basic acting techniques & skills through improvisation & short, scripted scenes. Techniques to be reviewed include transitions, inner monologue, oral interpretation, concrete & figurative gestures, and blocking. Whole-part & part-whole memorization will be used by students as they prepare one-act plays in conjunction with Drama Guild, to be performed during an evening performance. Students may perform for elementary students at Janesville Leisure Service’s Enchanted Forest, or at a neighboring elementary school. The course may culminate in a full-length play performed one evening with both high school theater classes.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: English 11 or English 11 – Honors
Course Number: 505920

Content: Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is a college-level introductory course that engages students in becoming skilled readers of mature prose, primarily non-fiction, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes with a focus on analysis and argumentation. The overarching purpose is to enable students to write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their personal and professional lives. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced placement exam.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: English 11 or English 11 – Honors
Course Number: 505820

Content: AP English Literature & Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of college-level literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers simultaneously use language, structure, imagery, symbolism, setting, character, tone as well as other literary strategies to create both meaning and pleasure for the reader. Writing is an integral part of the AP English Literature and Composition course which will focus on the critical analysis of literature including expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. Students should expect rigorous outside reading assignments of complex texts including short stories, novels, poetry, and drama. In class, students will participate in analytical discussion of the literature and will engage in frequent timed essay writing. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

CREATIVE WRITING
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: English 10
Course Number: Semester A: 505221
Or Semester B: 505222

Content: This class will encourage and develop a student’s creative writing abilities. Freedom will be provided in most assignments to allow students to add their own unique perspectives. Short fiction, poetry, scriptwriting, and multi-media projects are all items which are typically covered. Students will be expected to write and review on a continual basis, and beginning to experienced writers are able to enroll.

DIVERSE CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: English 10
Course Number: Semester A: 505021
Or Semester B: 505022

Content: This course focuses on the literature, poetry, and music of diverse world cultures. Students will study texts by diverse authors from America and around the globe. Topics discussed include race, gender, sexuality, world religions, and immigration. Students will write argumentatively about the texts as well as other social justice issues in preparation for college-level writing.

ENGLISH 9
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 501120

Content: Students will study conflict, identity, and responsibility through the study of literature and informational text. Non-fiction, poetry, and short stories will also be used to prompt writing and extend the study of essential questions. Critical thinking skills and close reading of text are emphasized. Students will complete short research projects and study Greek and Latin roots and stems. Writing instruction will focus on paragraph writing using textual evidence and multi-paragraph persuasive essay writing. Grammar instruction will include sentence structure, punctuation, and proper usage.

ENGLISH 9 – HONORS
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 501020

Content: Students will study conflict, identity, and responsibility through the study of literature and informational text. Non-fiction, poetry, and short stories will also be used to prompt writing and extend the study of essential questions. Critical thinking skills and close reading of text are heavily emphasized, and students will complete research projects and study Greek and Latin roots and stems. Writing instruction will focus on paragraph writing using textual evidence and multi-paragraph essay writing. Grammar instruction will include sentence structure, punctuation, and proper usage.
Note: What sets this course apart from a “regular” level course is extensive, independent reading and analysis of text.

ENGLISH 10
Grade: 10
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: English 9
Course Number: 502020

Content: The emphasis for this course is on World Literature and includes works from ancient civilizations through modern times. Non-fiction selections will be used to prompt writing and extend the study of world literature. Students will participate in literature circles to examine and explore contemporary world conflicts. Critical thinking skills and close reading of text are emphasized. Writing instruction will focus on using textual evidence to support analysis and multi-paragraph argumentative essay writing. In addition, students will use the research process as they write a research paper. Vocabulary instruction will study Greek and Latin roots, stems, and vocabulary terms. Grammar instruction will focus on parts of a sentence, phrases, and clauses with an application on applying these skills to construct correct and varied sentences in students’ writing.

ENGLISH 10 – HONORS
Grade: 10 or Grade 9 if student has completed Challenge Magnet Program English
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: English 9 or Challenge Magnet Program English
Course Number: 502010

Content: The emphasis for this course is on World Literature and includes works from ancient civilizations through modern times. Non-fiction selections will be used to prompt writing and extend the study of world literature. Students will participate in literature circles to examine and explore contemporary world conflicts. Critical thinking skills and close reading of text are heavily emphasized. Writing instruction will focus on using textual evidence to support analysis and multi-paragraph argumentative essay writing. In addition, the research process will be a major part of this course as students complete a research paper. Vocabulary instruction will focus on Greek and Latin roots, stems, and vocabulary terms. Grammar instruction will focus on parts of a sentence, phrases, and clauses with an application on applying these skills to construct correct and varied sentences in students’ writing.
Note: What sets this course apart from a “regular” level course is extensive, independent reading and analysis of text. In addition, students will be asked to show divergent thinking through the research and completion of a college-level research paper.

ENGLISH 11
Grade: 11 or Grade 10 if student has completed Accelerated English 9-10 – Honors
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: English 10
Course Number: 503020

Content: Students will examine the American literary experience through the writings of significant authors of American Literature. In addition to major works, supplemental pieces including poetry, non-fiction, and speeches from different literary periods will be studied and analyzed. In addition, literature circles will be used to expose students to the varying perspectives of the American Experience. Critical thinking skills and close reading of text are emphasized. ACT-style argumentative essay writing will be a key component to this course.

ENGLISH 11 – HONORS
Grade: 11 or Grade 10 if student has completed Accelerated English 9-10 – Honors
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: English 9/10 Accelerated or English 10
Course Number: 503010

Content: Students will examine the American literary experience through the writings of significant authors of American Literature. In addition to major works, supplemental pieces including poetry, non-fiction, and speeches from different literary periods will be studied and analyzed. In addition, literature circles will be utilized to expose students to the varying perspectives of the American Experience. Critical thinking skills and close reading of text are heavily emphasized.
College preparatory writing will be emphasized in this course. This includes ACT-style argumentative essay writing and literary analysis writing.
Note: What sets this course apart from a “regular” level course is the extensive, independent reading and analysis of college-level text.

ENGLISH 12
Grade: 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: English 11
Course Number: 504820

Content: In this course students will examine a variety of major American and British authors in addition to contemporary multicultural writings. Composition; literature, both fiction and nonfiction; literature circles; vocabulary; and grammar are covered in this course. Writing assignments will include expository, analytical, persuasive, responsive, and research compositions to develop understanding and prepare students for future responsibilities as workers and students.

FILM MAKING I
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Intro to Media & Journalism
Course Number: Semester A: 507121
Or Semester B: 507122

Content: This course will explore all aspects of the film industry from the essential canon of cinematic history to the in-and-outs of everyday on-set production. Students will learn all stages of film production from pre-production budgeting and casting, to production cinematography and directorial choices, to post-production editing and distribution. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own ideas for the screen by concentrating on the basics of visual storytelling and constructive analysis. Students will build their ideas first into a treatment, then an outline, rough draft, and ultimately, a shooting script. In addition to working on original ideas in the classroom, students will train in a state-of-the-art broadcast studio equipped with the industry’s leading technologies. Students will participate in a capstone 48-hour short film project.

FILM MAKING II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Filmmaking I
Course Number: Semester A: 507131
Or Semester B: 507132

Content: This course will explore in-depth all aspects of the film industry from the essential canon of cinematic history to the in-and-outs of everyday on-set production. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own ideas for the screen by concentrating on the basics of visual storytelling and constructive analysis. Students will also learn about documentary filmmaking and the difference in narratives between documentary and fiction works. Students will use the state-of-the-art broadcast studio to bring their stories to life. The anticipated outcome for the course will be a full 10-12 minute, festival-ready, short film class project that is submitted to festivals and marketed to students, a small group documentary project, and a large case study paper based on a film/filmmaker of choice. Students will have the opportunity to take on various leadership roles within a production.

INTRO TO MEDIA & JOURNALISM
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 507011
Or Semester B: 507012

Content: This will be a hands-on, production-based course grounded in sound journalistic practices, laws, and ethics. Students will learn news literacy, news writing, design & layout, photojournalism, broadcast scripting, storyboarding, and multimedia production. Units covered will include newspaper design & layout, on & off camera interviewing, documentary shorts, and photography for print media, podcasts, and broadcasting among others. Students will be responsible for creating content for school publications.

INTRODUCTION TO THEATER AND ACTING
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 506011
Or Semester B: 506012

Content: Learn on your feet, not on your seat! Topics include theater games, improvisation, characterization, and script analysis. Skills include public speaking and nonverbal communication (gestures, facial expressions, body language) for careers in the arts, business, or any field requiring clear and confident presentation skills. Materials include monologues, two-person acting scenes, group skits and plays, cut from classic and modern plays, TV shows and movies. Students will write, direct, and act out original scripts. Informal journals and formal expository writings will analyze scenes, plays and movies. Students may attend a live play and write a formal review. Students may take this class more than once.

LITERACY STRATEGIES 9
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Course referral and concurrent enrollment in English 9
Course Number: 501220

Content: This course builds student success in English 9. Together, both classes increase student confidence and proficiency in reading and writing. Students will apply reading strategies and technology tools to text from English 9. They also will read supplemental fiction and nonfiction and student selected materials. Because this course earns elective credit toward graduation, students should also be enrolled in English 9.

LITERACY STRATEGIES 10
Grade: 10
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Course referral and concurrent enrollment in English 10
Course Number: 502220

Content: This course builds student success in English 10. Together, both classes increase student confidence and proficiency in reading and writing. Students will apply reading strategies and technology tools to text from English 10. They also will read supplemental fiction and nonfiction and student selected materials. Because this course earns elective credit towards graduation, students should also be enrolled in English 10.

LITERACY STRATEGIES 11
Grade: 11
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Course referral and concurrent enrollment in English 11
Course Number: 503220

Content: This course builds student success in English 11. Together, both classes increase student confidence and proficiency in reading and writing. Students will apply reading strategies and technology tools to text from English 11. They also will read supplemental fiction and nonfiction and student selected materials. Because this course earns elective credit towards graduation, students should also be enrolled in English 11.

MULTI-MEDIA PRODUCTION
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Intro to Media & Journalism
Course Number: 507110

Content: Be part of the team producing student videos and news broadcasts. Students will learn multi-media production skills including scripting, story boarding, lighting, filming, sound, directing, acting, and editing. Practice these skills by creating short personal introduction videos, video scavenger hunts and video yearbook segments to be uploaded to a portfolio website. Train in a state-of-the-art broadcast studio equipped with two studio cameras, seven camcorders, four field cameras, a green screen, 32-channel light board, iPad teleprompter, boom mics and industry-standard broadcast mics. Join one of four field camera crews creating school spirit videos like “Teachers Read “Mean Tweets” and “Bad Lip Reading,” as well as promotional videos for school events such as Bags of Hope and Operation Click. Apply for leadership roles including Editor-In-Chief, Features Editor, Sports Editor, and Social Media Editor.

NEWSPAPER
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Intro to Media & Journalism
Course Number: 509010

Content: This course is a laboratory experience in the production of the student newspaper. Students may write, edit, and proofread stories; write headlines; lay out pages; sell and lay out advertisements; draw cartoons and other art works; take and develop photographs; and distribute the papers.

NOVEL STUDIES
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: English 10
Course Number: Semester A: 505321
Or Semester B: 505322

Content: This is a course designed for students who enjoys reading and analyzing literature. Students will improve comprehensive reading skills and analytical writing skills through exposure to a variety of literature. The course will also encourage students to become a life-long reader.

BTC LOGO

AS ORAL COMMUNICATION
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: English 10
Course Number: Semester A: 505621
Or Semester B: 505622

Content: This class will develop the basic skills of oral communication and help students become effective communicators. Units of study include the communication process, interpersonal communication, effective listening, small group discussion, and public speaking. Students can expect to participate in regular task oriented groups and to make several public presentations to the class.

SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: English 10
Course Number: Semester A: 505421
Or Semester B: 505422

Content: This course offers a survey of science fiction and fantasy, transporting readers to planets light-years away, or deep inside the caves of a far-distant past. The goals of Science Fiction and Fantasy are to develop the following: to examine science fiction themes and motifs in literature and film, to explore the basis for these themes in society and how they were reflected in literature and film of the time, to examine these themes in detail and discuss the similarities and differences, to examine and discuss current world tensions and how they might play out in literature and film, and to think critically about the relationship between societal issues and how they are reflected in popular culture.

SOCIAL JUSTICE: THE POWER OF CHOICE AND VOICE
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 501310

Content: Students will study how writers and performers use “text” in all genres to fight for social justice. This course will develop skills in language, critical and creative thinking, and reading as student’s research social justice and culturally charged issues and create multi-genre projects of their choice to affect change. The genres could include, but not be limited to, performance poetry, music, documentary films, visual art, public speaking, and other internet or print publications. This course will expand self-discipline, confidence, and creative expression while reinforcing the importance and responsibility of informed citizens instigating change for a more socially just community.

BTC LOGO

AS WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: English 11
Course Number: Semester A: 505121
Or Semester B: 505122

Content: This course is for those students who would benefit from work on the writing process: planning, organizing, writing, and revising papers. Students will write paragraphs and essays dealing with process, analysis, argumentation, and persuasion as well as other types of writing, including business communication. Students also will complete a research paper.

YEARBOOK
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Intro to Media & Journalism or Instructor Consent
Course Number: 509020

Content: Students will publish a yearbook for their peers. They will learn the basics of yearbook journalism – theme development, financial responsibility, page layout and design, copy writing and editing, graphics and special effects, indexing, and student press law. Students interested in photography will study photo composition, organization, and editing using Adobe Suite. This course requires time outside of the scheduled school day.


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

Architecture & Construction ~ Education & Training ~ Hospitality & tourism ~ Human Services

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
AS Aspiring Educators   E E E
AS Assistant Child Care Teacher A.C.C.T. - Honors     E E
AS Child Development   E E E
AS Culinary Arts I * E E E E
AS Culinary Arts II *   E E E
AS Culinary Arts III ProStart *   E E E
FACS COOP     E E
Fashion and Design E E E E
Global Foods * E E E E
Health Occupations   E E E
Home and Interior Design E E E E
AS Medical Terminology   E E E
Parenting   E E E
Principles of Baking *   E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

 

BTC LOGO

AS ASPIRING EDUCATORS
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 722240

Content: Aspiring Educators is a course designed for students who want to become educators. The course involves classroom discussions of educational principles, concepts, and issues related to student-teacher-school-community interaction. This will include developmental aspects, socio-cultural influences and human relations aspects.
The class will consist of a combination of classroom instruction as well as field experiences. Each student will be given the opportunity to observe in School District of Janesville classrooms.

BTC LOGO

AS ASSISTANT CHILDCARE TEACHER A.C.C.T. – HONORS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 and an opportunity to earn licensure (providing competency and attendance requirements are met)
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: AS Child Development
Course Number: Semester A: 723421
Or Semester B: 723422

Content: The purpose of this course is to assist students in attaining the necessary skills needed to enter the world of work or post-secondary education in the childcare services field. Units include the childcare center environment, child guidance, establishing positive occupational relationships, professional development, food, and nutrition for children, health and safety, classroom activities/curriculum, and special needs. Observation of children and possible field trips should be expected. Students participating in this course have the opportunity to be licensed through the State of Wisconsin.

BTC LOGO

AS CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester B: 722222

Content: This course examines child development within the context of the early childhood education setting. Course competencies include: analyze social, cultural and economic influences on child development; summarize child development theories; analyze development of children age three through age eight; summarize the methods and designs of child development research; analyze the role of heredity and the environment; and examine the role of brain development in early learning (ages 3-8).

BTC LOGO

AS CULINARY ARTS I *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 721621
Or Semester B: 721622

Content: Explore a variety of different food preparation methods, develop cooking and measuring skills, and understand the function of ingredients, healthy eating, and current topics in nutrition & hunger in America. Major Topics: Safety & sanitation; grains, fruits & vegetables, proteins, meal planning. Some examples of Labs: Pizzas, cinnamon rolls, stir fry, fried rice.

BTC LOGO

AS CULINARY ARTS II *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Culinary Arts I
Course Number: Semester A: 722021
Or Semester B: 722022

Content: This course will expand on a variety of different food preparation methods, including quantity cooking, mass production, food safety and presentation. The skills learned throughout the course can be used in preparation for many food occupations. Expect to run a mini business with catering, restaurant and special food events and projects. ServeSafe curriculum will be used and students will be given an opportunity to prepare for National Restaurant Association certification.

BTC LOGO

AS CULINARY ARTS III ProStart *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Culinary Arts II
Instructor Consent
Course Number: Semester A: 722031
Or Semester B: 722032

Content: This course is part of the ProStart Program. ProStart is a nationally recognized two-year School-to-Career program designed by the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association. ProStart teaches the basic skills and knowledge that students need for success in the foodservice industry. Students are offered instruction ranging from basic food preparation to accounting and cost control. In addition, there is an emphasis on safety and sanitation, communication, management, customer service, and workplace safety. At the conclusion of the safety and sanitation unit, the culinary lab experience, which includes soups, sauces, fruits, vegetables, and grains, will begin. There is an opportunity for work experience credit for students who are employed in the foodservice industry. Students will take the first part of a national credentialing exam at the conclusion of this course.

FACS COOP
Grades: 11, 12*
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Previously taken or concurrent enrollment in an FACS class.
Course Number: 729520

Content: Employment opportunities exist in childcare, restaurants, and health care. Students will work in their chosen career area and receive pay and credit for on-the-job work experience. Students will receive release time from school for working at least 12-15 hours per week.
*2nd year COOP students must work towards a state skills certificate in one of the areas covered.
COOP requirements include weekly work logs and quarterly employer completed evaluations.

FASHION AND DESIGN
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester B: 721222

Content: This course offers students the opportunity to investigate aspects of the fashion industry from careers in fashion to personal style and design concepts. In this course there will be multiple design projects and activities. Students will be able to design a line of clothing using design elements and principles from the class.

GLOBAL FOODS *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Culinary Arts 1
Course Number: Semester A: 721821
Or Semester B: 721822

Content: This course offers opportunities to explore and taste different cuisine from countries around the world as students use their cooking skills learned in Foods for Life. Students will investigate the geographical and cultural factors that influence the kinds of foods grown and eaten in each country. Students will come away with a broadened view of the world and deeper understanding of other cultures and ethnic cuisine.

HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 723021
Or Semester B: 723022

Content: The field of Health Care is full of opportunities and growing rapidly every year. Students will have many opportunities to investigate the wide range of career opportunities in health. A variety of guest speakers and activities are offered during the semester. Students will study ethics, medical history, the health system, and medical terminology. This course is also offered under Health.

HOME AND INTERIOR DESIGN
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 721421

Content This course offers opportunities where students will explore the latest trends in home and interior design. Students will learn the basics of housing design; elements of design, principles of design, the magic of color, etc. Students will have opportunities to create designs and experiment with some of the elements and principles of design. Students will investigate careers and designers in housing and interior design.

BTC LOGO

AS MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 586521

Content: This course should be taken by students interested in entering the health care field or learning the medical language. This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation in the medical language. Throughout this course, students will begin to understand/explore the wide variety of health care careers. Units of study include: In-depth study of word parts in order to pronounce, spell, build, analyze and define medical terms: Introduction to anatomy & terminology revolving around several body organs/systems.

PARENTING
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 722221

Content: Parenting is a semester course designed to prepare students for your roles as family and community members, parents and caregivers. Throughout this course, you will develop realistic expectations for children and how best to promote their physical, emotional, social and psychological development.

PRINCIPLES OF BAKING *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Culinary Arts I
Course Number: Semester B: 721922

Content: During this course, students will participate in activities and labs that link chemistry and food preparation. Students will investigate baking principles that affect the outcome of food products. This course will include different preparation techniques and ingredients. General lab activities include bread making, cake baking & decorating, desserts, pies and more.


HEALTH

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Health Applications*   E/R E/R E/R
Health Occupation   E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

HEALTH APPLICATIONS
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 521021
Or Semester B: 521022

Content: This course offers an emphasis on decision making & healthy lifestyles. A variety of topics are discussed such as mental health issues like self-esteem, mental illness, suicide, and grief. ATODA issues (Alcohol, Tobacco, and other Drugs of Abuse) with an emphasis on alcohol, “street” drugs and “club” drugs as well as addiction and treatment options will also be discussed. Relationships and sexuality issues are also investigated. Topics including love & lust, reproduction, STI’s (Sexually Transmitted Infections) and HIV/AIDS are all discussed. Nutrition & nutrition related topics are also included.
*For the graduating classes of 2020 & 2021: If a student has not taken/passed health in 7th or 8th grade, they must take this course to fulfill their graduation requirement. However, students may also take this as elective credit.
Beginning with the graduating class of 2022, 0.5 credits in Health Applications is required for high school graduation.

HEALTH OCCUPATIONS
Grades: 10, 11 ,12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 723021
Or Semester B: 723022

Content: The field of Health Care is full of opportunities and growing rapidly every year. Students will have many opportunities to investigate the wide range of career opportunities in health. A variety of guest speakers and activities are offered during the semester. Students will study ethics, medical history, the health system and medical terminology. This course is also offered under Family and Consumer Sciences.


MATHEMATICS

Architecture & Construction ~ Science, Technology Engineering & Mathematics

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
TC Advanced Computer Science AB – JAVA (EM) *     E/EM E/EM
AP Calculus AB     R R
AP Calculus BC       R
AP Computer Science A – JAVA (EM)   E/EM E/EM E/EM
AP Computer Science Principles (EM)   E/EM E/EM E/EM
AP Statistics   R R R
AS College Mathematics     E/R E/R
Computer Programming I (EM) E/EM E/EM E/EM E/EM
Computer Programming II (EM) E/EM E/EM E/EM E/EM
Digital Electronics (EM, PLTW, MSOE)   E/EM E/EM E/EM
Integrated Math I R      
Integrated Math I Honors R R R R
Integrated Math II   R R R
Accelerated Math II – Honors   R R R
Integrated Math III R R R R
Integrated Math III – Honors R R R R
Integrated Math IV     R R
AS Introduction to Statistics     E/R E/R
AS Math for the Trades     E/R E/R
Math Strategies I E E E E
Math Strategies II E E E E
Math Strategies III   E E E
Math Strategies IV     E E
Pre-Calculus – Honors   R R R

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics*
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)
For additional clarification or alternatives to the options indicated, consult your Mathematics Department chairperson or high school counselor.
Students must complete each course with a passing grade before proceeding to the next level course.
*** A student can earn up to one equivalent math (EM) credit towards the math requirement for graduation.

PIE LOGO

TC ADVANCED COMPUTER SCIENCE AB – JAVA (EM) *
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: AP Computer Science A - JAVA
Course Number: 684420

Content: This yearlong course is comparable to the second course in the introductory sequence for computer science majors in college. The Computer Science course is intended to serve both as a second step for computer science majors and as a course for people who will major in other disciplines that require significant involvement with technology. JAVA is a platform independent language and the programs students write will compile successfully on Macintosh or Windows operating systems. Upon completion of the course, students will have finished the equivalent of a second semester course in college computer science. Students will be responsible for paying for the tuition, which is about one third of the cost as an undergraduate (approximately $300).
This course is also offered under Computer Sciences.

AP CALCULUS AB
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Pre-calculus - Honors
Course Number: 545020

Content: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to derivatives, integrations and their applications. This is university level calculus. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam. A graphing calculator is recommended for this course.

AP CALCULUS BC
Grade: 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: AP Calculus AB
Course Number: 545120

Content: This is a full year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. It includes all topics covered in Calculus AB plus parametric, polar, and vector functions; improper integrals; differential equations; advanced integration techniques; polynomial approximations and series. This is university level calculus. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam. A graphing calculator is recommended for this course.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A – JAVA (EM)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I
Course Number: 684320

Content: This yearlong course is comparable to the first course in the introductory sequence for computer science majors in college. An AP Computer Science A course is intended to serve both as an introductory course for computer science majors and as a course for people who will major in other disciplines that require significant involvement with technology. JAVA is a platform independent language and the programs students write will compile successfully on Macintosh or Windows operating systems. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.
This course is also offered under Computer Sciences.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES (EM)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I
Course Number: 684520

Content: This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cyber-security concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles will give students the opportunity to use technology to address real-world problems and build relevant solutions. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.
This course is also offered under Computer Sciences.

BTC LOGO

AP STATISTICS
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math III or Integrated Math III-Honors
Course Number: 545220

Content: Advanced Placement Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. Students will explore patterns in data, plan and conduct a study through sampling and experimentation, anticipate patterns using probability and simulation, and estimate population parameters. Introductory statistics is typically required for majors such as social sciences, health sciences and business. Science, engineering and mathematics majors usually take an upper-level calculus-based course in statistics, for which the AP Statistics course is preparation. Students planning to enroll in Calculus in college are encouraged to take this course concurrently with either Pre-Calculus or AP Calculus. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam. A graphing calculator is recommended for this course.

BTC LOGO

AS College Mathematics
Grades: 11 ,12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math III or Integrated Math III Honors
Course Number: 544110

Content: This course is designed to review and develop fundamental concepts of mathematics pertinent to the areas of: 1) arithmetic and algebra; 2) geometry and trigonometry; and 3) probability and statistics. Special emphasis is placed on problem solving, critical thinking and logical reasoning, making connections, and using calculators. Topics include performing arithmetic operations and simplifying algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities in one variable, solving proportions and incorporating percent applications, manipulating formulas, solving and graphing systems of linear equations and inequalities in two variables, finding areas and volumes of geometric figures, applying similar and congruent triangles, converting measurements within and between U.S. and metric systems, applying Pythagorean Theorem, solving right and oblique triangles, calculating probabilities, organizing data and interpreting charts, calculating central and spread measures, and summarizing and analyzing data.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, I (EM)
Grades: 9, 10, 11 ,12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 681121
Or Semester B: 681122

Content: Computer Programming I is the beginning programming semester course. Students will learn a modern object orientated programming language that produces programs for Macintosh or Windows machines. Students will design programs that will include music, audio, movies, graphics and interactive real world applications. These projects will emphasize communication of ideas and information available to a wide range of student interests. This will allow for a smooth transition to other languages such as JAVA and C++. Topics include use of algorithms and variables with decision and repeat structures.
This course is also offered under Computer Sciences.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING II (EM)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Computer Programming I
Course Number: Semester A: 681221
Or Semester B: 681222

Content: Computer Programming II is the advanced programming semester course which expands the computing knowledge and skills acquired in the Computer Programming I class. Students will learn advanced programming techniques. Multimedia projects will include the use of video and sound technologies. The emphasis will be on effective communication of ideas and information through high level programming strategies involving objects and classes. These strategies include control structures and the handling of numerical and word data through functions and classes.
This course is also offered under Computer Sciences.

MOSE Logo
PLTW Logo

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
(EM, PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: IED and Integrated Math I
Course Number: 782220

Content: Digital Electronics introduces students to the fundamentals and applications of digital electronics, programmable logic controls, and the application of electronic circuits and devices. Students will design and test digital circuitry through a blend of hands-on and academic activities.
This course is also offered under Technology and Engineering

INTEGRATED MATH I
Grades: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 540120

Content: The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other, and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students will use properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend prior understanding of geometric knowledge. The final unit in the course ties together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied. The Mathematical Practice Standards will also be applied throughout the course.

INTEGRATED MATH I - HONORS
Grades: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 542450

Content: The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other, and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students will use properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend prior understanding of geometric knowledge. The course will tie together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied. The Mathematical Practice Standards will also be applied throughout the course. Additional content standards may be explored. This course will prepare students for Integrated Math 2 or Accelerated Math II Honors.

INTEGRATED MATH II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I
Course Number: 542120

Content: This course will start with a focus on geometric vocabulary, transformations in the coordinate plane, triangles, and congruence. Quadratic expressions, equations, and functions and their characteristics will be explored. Real and complex numbers will be introduced as well. Students will also focus on similarity and right triangle trigonometry. Properties of circles will round out the course. The Mathematical Practice Standards will also be applied throughout the course. This course will prepare students for Integrated Math III.

ACCELERATED MATH II – HONORS
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I or Integrated Math I Honors
Course Number: 542480

Content: This course will combine the majority of Integrated Math 2 and portions of Integrated Math 3. The focus of Mathematics 2 is on quadratic expressions, equations, and functions; comparing their characteristics and behavior to those of linear and exponential relationships from Mathematics 1. The need for extending the set of rational numbers arises and real and complex numbers are introduced so that all quadratic equations can be solved. The link between probability and data is explored through conditional probability and counting methods, including their use in making and evaluating decisions. The study of similarity leads to an understanding of right triangle trigonometry and connects to quadratics through Pythagorean relationships. Circles, with their quadratic algebraic representations, will also be included in the course.

INTEGRATED MATH III
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math II
Course Number: 543020

Content: This course is designed to be taken after Integrated Math II building on the concepts covered. The focus of the course will include conic sections, polynomial relationships, rational relationships, radical relationships, trigonometry, mathematical modeling, and geometric modeling. The Mathematical Practice Standards will also be applied throughout the course. This course will prepare students for Integrated Math IV.

INTEGRATED MATH III - HONORS
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math II or Integrated Math II - Honors
Course Number: 543440

Content: This course is designed to be taken after Integrated Math II building on the concepts covered. The focus of the course will include conic sections, polynomial relationships, rational relationships, radical relationships, trigonometry, mathematical modeling, and geometric modeling. The Mathematical Practice Standards will also be applied throughout the course. Additional content standards will be explored. This course will prepare students for Pre-Calculus – Honors.

INTEGRATED MATH IV
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math III
Course Number: 542440

Content: This course will analyze the common core math standards beyond those previously learned in Integrated Math I, Integrated Math II, and Integrated Math III. Students will learn about the complex number system, vectors, and matrix operations. Students will focus on how to apply these topics to real-world situations. This course will also focus on preparing students for the math portion of the ACT test.

BTC LOGO

AS INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math III or Integrated Math III Honors
Course Number: 545320

Content: Students taking Introductory Statistics display data with graphs, describe distributions with numbers perform correlation and regression analyses, and design experiments. They use probability and distributions to make predictions, estimate parameters, and test hypotheses.

BTC LOGO

AS MATH FOR THE TRADES
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math III
Course Number: 545130

Content: This course consists of Shop Mathematics I and Shop Mathematics II. This course begins with the basic principles of arithmetic as applied to typical manufacturing and construction problems and continues with the study of the properties of circles, volumes and surface areas of various solids, an introduction to practical algebra and trigonometric principles used in solving right triangles as well as applications of the sine and cosine law in solving oblique triangles.

MATH STRATEGIES I
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Take concurrently with Integrated Math I
Course Number: 541110

Content: This math intervention course is designed to be taken simultaneously with Integrated Math I. Students will work on developing the essential math skills that are the foundation of the high school math curriculum. Students will also learn and practice different strategies to help them succeed in their core math class. Students should also be enrolled in Integrated Math I. This course does not meet mathematics graduation requirements.

MATH STRATEGIES II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Take concurrently with Integrated Math II
Course Number: 542320

Content: This math intervention course is designed to be taken simultaneously with Integrated Math II. Students will work on developing the essential math skills that are the foundation of the high school math curriculum. Students will also learn and practice different strategies to help them succeed in their core math class. Students should also be enrolled in Integrated Math II. This course does not meet mathematics graduation requirements.

MATH STRATEGIES III
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Take concurrently with Integrated Math III
Course Number: 543220

Content: This math intervention course is designed to be taken simultaneously with Integrated Math III. Students will work on developing the essential math skills that are the foundation of the high school math curriculum. Students will also learn and practice different strategies to help them succeed in their core math class. Students should also be enrolled in Integrated Math III. This course does not meet mathematics graduation requirements.

MATH STRATEGIES IV
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Take concurrently with Integrated Math IV
Course Number: 543230

Content: This math intervention course is designed to be taken simultaneously with Integrated Math IV. Students will work on developing the essential math skills that are the foundation of the high school math curriculum. Students will also learn and practice different strategies to help them succeed in their core math class. Students should also be enrolled in Integrated Math IV. This course does not meet mathematics graduation requirements.

PRE-CALCULUS - HONORS
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math III – Honors or Instructor Consent
Course Number: 543520

Content: The purpose of this course is to take a graphing calculator approach to understanding the following types of functions: algebraic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. This course will prepare students for AP Calculus. A graphing calculator is recommended for this course.


MUSIC

Arts, A/V Technology & Commuincations

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
A Cappella Choir   E E E
Accelerated A Cappella Choir – Honors     E E
Accelerated Orchestra – Honors     E E
Accelerated Wind Ensemble – Honors     E E
AP Music Theory     E E
Bel Canto Choir (Parker HS Only)   E E E
Bella Voce (Craig HS Only) E E E E
Concert Band E      
Introduction to Music Theory/Music History   E E E
Introduction to Theater Design and Construction E E E E
Jazz Ensemble   E E E
Mixed Choir E E E E
Music Technology I E E E E
Music Technology II E E E E
Percussion Fundamentals E E E E
Philharmonic Orchestra E E E E
Symphonic Band   E E E
Symphonic Orchestra   E E E
The Power Chords (Craig HS Only) E E E E
Vocal Jazz (Craig HS Only)   E E E
Wind Ensemble   E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

A CAPPELLA CHOIR
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Audition
Course Number: 764520

Content: Students selected will be expected to exhibit a high degree of competence in musical and vocal skills. Work in the A Cappella Choir will center around techniques in using the singing voice for both solo and ensemble work. Understanding will be gained in music of many periods and styles, although the “classics” of choral literature are highly emphasized. Through musical analysis and performance, A Cappella Choir students are engaged in exploring great music. Students electing A Cappella Choir must audition with the instructor. Students are encouraged to participate in the Musical and District Solo and Ensemble Festival. The choir usually participates in at least 4 concerts. Attendance is required at all scheduled performances. Students may repeat for credit each year.

ACCELERATED A CAPPELLA CHOIR – HONORS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Audition
Course Number: 764820

Content: This rigorous course provides students who are developing their vocal skills at a high level the opportunity to demonstrate their abilities through a variety of demanding performance opportunities. Students taking this course are seeking opportunities beyond the expectations of a comprehensive choral music education. Leadership skills will be enhanced through active participation as section leaders. Individual expectations, demanding rehearsal requirements, and additional state/community programs complete a list of involvements that are designed to promote musical excellence and real world applications of responsibility, cooperation, and assertiveness.

ACCELERATED ORCHESTRA – HONORS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Audition
Course Number: 766220

Content: This rigorous course provides students with evolving instrumental skills the opportunity to demonstrate their abilities through a variety of demanding performance opportunities. A portfolio of summative student work will be produced in addition to classroom activities. Demanding rehearsal requirements, leadership opportunities, and additional state/community programs complete a list of possible involvements that are designed to promote real world applications of responsibility, cooperation, and assertiveness.

ACCELERATED WIND ENSEMBLE – HONORS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Audition
Course Number: 762820

Content: This rigorous course provides students who are developing their instrumental performance skills at a high level the opportunity to demonstrate their abilities through a variety of demanding performance opportunities. Students taking this course are seeking opportunities beyond the expectations of the comprehensive instrumental curriculum. Leadership skills will be enhanced through active participation as section leaders. Individual expectations, demanding rehearsal requirements, and additional state/community programs complete a list of involvements that are designed to promote musical excellence and real world applications of responsibility, cooperation, and assertiveness.

AP MUSIC THEORY
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Introduction to Music Theory/Music History or Instructor Consent
Course Number: 766400

Content: Music oriented students will be exposed to a rigorous, systematic study of the musical process. Students will become competent in rhythm, melody, keyboard studies, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, tonality, sight-singing, part writing, composition, and electronic music. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam. Depending on the number of students registered at each school, this course may or may not be a site-specific class.

BEL CANTO CHOIR (Parker HS Only)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Audition
Course Number: 764920

Content: Female students selected will be expected to exhibit a high degree of competence in musical and vocal skills. Work in the Bel Canto Choir will center around techniques in using the singing voice for both solo and ensemble work. Understanding will be gained in music of many periods and styles, although the “classics” of choral literature are highly emphasized. Through musical analysis and performance, Bel Canto Choir students are engaged in exploring great music. Attendance is required at all scheduled performances. Students are encouraged to participate in the musical and District Solo and Ensemble Festival. Students may repeat for credit each year.

CONCERT BAND
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: 8th Grade Band or Instructor Consent
Course Number: 761020

Content: This is the freshman band. This band performs a wide variety of music, with emphasis placed on continued growth and development of playing skills, as well as ensemble performance skills. During the first quarter, emphasis is on preparation for marching band performances at parades and home football games. This includes some required outside-of-class rehearsals; these rehearsals do not conflict with other sports practices or games. During the remaining three quarters, students perform at several concerts. Outside-of-school performances are a class requirement. Practice time outside of class is required and considered vital to the student’s growth on his/her instrument. Students also participate in the pep band which performs at a number of home athletic events. Students will receive information on the summer band camp. Participation in District Solo and Ensemble Festival is optional and encouraged. Grading is based on performance and written assessments. Students may repeat for credit each year.

INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THEORY/MUSIC HISTORY
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 766421
Or Semester B: 766422

Content: This course is an introduction to Music Theory and Music History. Basic music theory concepts will be introduced such as note names, rhythmic structures, scales, key signatures and other foundational music concepts. This course will also focus on music from all periods (Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and 20th Century) and its composers. Students who are interested in taking AP Music Theory are encouraged to take this course.

INTRODUCTION TO THEATER DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 783521

Content: Introduction to Theater Design and Construction will expose students to set design and construction as well as theatrical lighting and sound in this hands-on class. Students will be making the sets and props for the current musical/theatrical productions as well as working with sounds and lighting for the shows. This course may be taken multiple academic years for credit.
This course is also offered under Technology and Engineering.

JAZZ ENSEMBLE
Grades: 10,11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Audition
Course Number: 761620

Content: Jazz Ensemble is a performance group that will rehearse and perform a variety of jazz music from all associated musical eras including, but not limited to, big bands, progressive, blues, Dixieland, modern, fusion and bebop. Students will also study the origins and history of jazz music. Written and performance assignments and assessments will be used. Jazz Ensemble is open to all students. Instrumentation includes brass and woodwind instruments as well as piano, guitar, and bass guitar, drum set and mallet percussion instruments. Students must have played an instrument for at least one year.

THE POWER CHORDS (Craig HS Only)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester B: 764312

Content: Students in this ensemble have the unique opportunity to perform repertoire selected for the baritone, bass and tenor voice. Fundamentals of vocal technique and music reading skills are developed. Emphasis is placed on performing music representing various historical/stylistic periods. While emphasis is placed on music for basses, tenors and baritones as an ensemble, there are opportunities for participation in solo and ensemble festival and the musical. Attendance is required at all scheduled performances. Students may repeat for credit each semester or year.

MIXED CHOIR
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 763021
And/or Semester B: 763022

Content: Fundamentals of musicianship and singing skills are learned and implemented. Emphasis is placed on the large ensemble; however, individual and small group singing is encouraged. Singers in this choir may audition for the musical and participate in District Solo and Ensemble Festival. Attendance is required for all scheduled concerts. Students may repeat for credit each semester or year.

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY I
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 763001
Or Semester B: 763002

Content: This course introduces students to the study of music technology and music fundamentals. It features the latest developments in music technology, such as synthesizers, computers, and recording equipment. The historical aspects of music technology will be discussed from early M.I.D.I. (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) applications to the latest equipment and computer software.
A variety of compositional software will be used such as Sibelius, Finale, Audacity and Garage Band. Students will learn basic piano keyboard techniques as well as how to arrange music for everything from Bach Chorales to Popular Music for a variety of instruments and voices. Students will learn a variety of computer note entry as well as basic recording techniques.

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY II
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Music Technology I or Instructor Consent
Course Number: Semester A: 763011
Or Semester B: 763012

Content: This course will explore real-life applications of microphones, recording equipment, video and audio editing and applications in concert settings. Students will work directly with the equipment found in the recording studio and in the auditorium. This is a class designed for students who are interested in pursuing a career in sound engineering or another music technology field.

PERCUSSION FUNDAMENTALS
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 761610

Content: This course will teach the fundamentals of percussion for students with any level of musical proficiency interested in joining band. In this class, students will utilize practice pads, snare drums and other percussion instruments concluding with a percussion ensemble piece at the end of each semester. This class will provide a baseline of technique that will serve the student going forward in band.

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: 8th Grade Orchestra or Instructor Consent
Course Number: 766020

Content: Students in this ensemble are involved in exploring new techniques to develop musicianship. The music performed by the orchestra is selected for expanding the scope of musical understanding and for improving the technical skills of the students enrolled. Music of many periods and styles are studied and opportunity is offered for chamber ensemble performance. Attendance is required at all performances. Students may repeat for credit each year.

SYMPHONIC BAND
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Concert Band
Course Number: 761520

Content: This is the intermediate level band. This band performs a wide variety of music, with emphasis placed on continued growth and development of playing skills, as well as ensemble performance skills. During the first quarter, emphasis is on preparation for marching band performances at parades and home football games. This includes some required outside-of-class rehearsals. During the remaining three quarters, students perform at several concerts. Outside-of-school performances are a class requirement. Practice time outside of class is required and considered vital to the student’s growth on his/her instrument. Students also participate in the pep band which performs at a number of home athletic events. Students will receive information on the summer band camp. Participation in District Solo and Ensemble Festival is optional and encouraged. Grading is based on performance and written assessments. Students may repeat for credit each year.

SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA
Grades: 10,11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Philharmonic Orchestra and Instructor Consent
Course Number: 766120

Content: Students selected for this ensemble have demonstrated the musicianship necessary to perform intermediate to advanced literature for orchestra. Emphasis is placed on developing musicianship, musical sensitivity, and performance skills in large and small ensembles. Attendance is required at all performances. Students may repeat for credit each semester or year.

VOCAL JAZZ (Craig HS Only)
Grades: 10,11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Audition, concurrent with another choral ensemble
Course Number: 764530

Content: Vocal Jazz is a performance ensemble where students will rehearse and perform a variety of vocal jazz music and styles. Students will explore jazz styles of classical jazz, ragtime, blues, and swing. Students will learn vocal improvisation, jazz phrasing, and vocal jazz technique focusing on use of inflections, dynamics, articulation, and interpretation. Vocal Jazz will perform at all curricular choir concerts. Students will also study the origins and history of jazz music. Written and performance assignments and assessments will be required. Vocal Jazz is open to all students. Students must have been enrolled in choir for at least one year prior to enrollment.

WIND ENSEMBLE
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Audition
Course Number: 762020

Content: This ensemble is composed of select musicians who have demonstrated the musicianship necessary to perform more advanced works for wind ensemble or full band. Emphasis is placed on the development of musicianship, aesthetic sensitivity, and performance skills. During the first quarter, emphasis is on preparation for marching band performances at parades and home football games. This includes some required outside of class rehearsals; these rehearsals do not conflict with other sports practices or games. During the remaining three quarters, students perform at several concerts. Outside-of-school performances are a class requirement. Practice time outside of class is required and considered vital to the student’s growth on his/her instrument. Students also participate in the pep band which performs at a number of home athletic events. Students will receive information on the summer band camp. Participation in District Solo and Ensemble Festival is optional and encouraged. Grading is based on performance and written. Students may repeat for credit each year.

BELLA VOCE (Craig HS Only)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 764021
And/or Semester B: 764022

Content: This course is catered towards the workings of soprano and alto voices. Materials in this course stress fundamentals of singing and musicianship in the performance of music of all periods and styles. Music representing many styles is represented, although “classics” are emphasized. Attendance is required at all scheduled concerts.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Adventure Physical Education *       R
American Red Cross Lifeguard Training *   R R R
Core Physical Education Grade 9 R      
Core Physical Education Grade 10, 11, & 12   R R R
Freshman Weight Training E      
Lifetime Health and Fitness   R R R
Physical Education Advanced     R R
Physical Education Alternative R R R R
Physical Education Cadet Leadership     R R
Pre-Cadet Leadership Class   R R  
Strength, Agility, and Conditioning   R R R
Team Sports   R R R

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

ADVENTURE PHYSICAL EDUCATION *
Grade: 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: 12th grade and all other Physical Education requirements met. Students must be comfortable in deep water.
Course Number: Semester A: 565221
Or Semester B: 565222

Content: Adventure physical education will include the following stages of adventure:
1) Teambuilding: get acquainted, movement, communication, problem solving, trust building, and debriefing/processing.
2) Survival: map and compass, geocaching, wilderness first aid, camping, outdoor cooking, fire-starting, and trip planning.
3) Prusik Climbing: learn basic knots, how to belay, rappel, and climbing techniques.
4) Outdoor Pursuits: canoeing, hiking, snow shoeing, downhill skiing, and archery.
Fitness workouts and team sports will also be part of the curriculum.

AMERICAN RED CROSS LIFEGUARD TRAINING *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Content: Must be age 16 by completion of course and have passed the American Red Cross Level IV of Learn to Swim program and/or be able to swim 300 yards using proper technique of front crawl and breast stroke.
Course Number: Semester A: 565121
Or Semester B: 565122

Content: Upon completion of required skills and receiving 80% or better on written tests, students will become certified as an American Red Cross Lifeguard. American Red Cross training makes learning fun and easy. Through classroom learning and hands-on practice, students will learn:

  •  Surveillance skills to help recognize and prevent injuries
  •  Rescue skills – in the water and on land
  •  First aid training and professional rescuer CPR/AED – to help prepare for any emergency
  •  Professional lifeguard responsibilities like interacting with the public and addressing uncooperative patrons

$36 Red Cross Certification Fee

CORE PHYSICAL EDUCATION GRADE 9
Grade: 9
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 561021
Or Semester B: 561022

Content: Curriculum covered in this course is intended for personal fitness improvement, enjoyment of lifetime activities and overall wellness. Students will participate in a variety of units that balance fitness, individual sports and team sports. The focus of the fitness unit is for students to acquire knowledge about the components of fitness, learn about the benefits of exercise and participate in fitness activities. Individual sports include, but not limited to, badminton, swim, pickle ball and weight training. Team sports include, but are not limited to, ultimate, basketball, speedball and soccer. Health concepts are infused throughout the curriculum on a consistent basis.

CORE PHYSICAL EDUCATION GRADE 10, 11, & 12
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 562021
Or Semester B: 562022

Content: Core Physical Education for 10th, 11th, & 12th grade is designed for the students who want to continue developing the basic skills and knowledge to participate in a variety of activities. The curriculum covered in this course is intended for personal fitness improvement, enjoyment of lifetime activity and overall wellness. The curriculum could include but is not limited to: Badminton, tennis, pickle ball, fitness conditioning, basketball, slow pitch softball, volleyball, soccer, ultimate games and other team sports.

FRESHMAN WEIGHT TRAINING
(Craig HS Only)
Grade: 9
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 564011
Or Semester B: 564012

Content: As students enter high school, it is a time when many students want to weight train seriously and with a purpose. Without proper knowledge of training and safety students can be putting themselves at risk for injuries. Freshman weight training will help to ensure students have the knowledge to be successful and benefit from strength training.

LIFETIME HEALTH AND FITNESS
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 564021
Or Semester B: 564022

Content: This class is designed to help students improve their fitness knowledge as well as provide an opportunity to improve their fitness levels. The class is broken into a combination of classroom and activity days. Students will participate in a variety of cardiovascular activities, flexibility training, muscular strength and endurance, and resistance training activities. The emphasis of this course is to introduce the students to a wide variety of personal fitness concepts that they may actively engage in outside of the classroom setting. On classroom day’s topics such as fitness strategies, nutrition, dieting, body image & composition, basic anatomy and physiology, along with the development of a personal fitness plan.

The goal of the class is to provide instruction while enjoying the execution of activities that lead to a lifetime of wellness. Some of the activities covered in this course may include: interval workouts on cardiovascular equipment, agility activities, fitness activities using bosu balls, resistance bands, stability ball equipment, step aerobics, Pilates, yoga, water activities, zumba and an ongoing strength training workout that focuses on each student’s personal fitness goal.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ADVANCED
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: 1 Semester or Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 565021
And/or Semester B: 565022

Content: This course is designed for students who have a high level of physical education skills, to participate with others in a competitive environment. The curriculum has many of the same activities, but not limited to, those that will be found in the 10th-11th-12th grade Core class and team sports class. The Advanced class is designed for students who want to participate with other students who are also highly motivated and skilled. This course has high expectations and will be very challenging.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ALTERNATIVE
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Instructor Consent
Course Number: Semester A: 568721
Or Semester B: 568722

Content: Alternative physical education is a semester course in which students will participate in physical activities to promote wellness. The activities can be but are not limited to walking, weightlifting, basketball, volleyball, tennis, water games, kickball, badminton, and paddleball. Student will participate in daily physical activities. They will learn the rules and promote classroom safety.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION CADET LEADERSHIP
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: Pre-cadet Leadership class
Course Number: Semester A: 563121
And/or Semester B: 563122

Contents: This course provides opportunities for the students to use and strengthen their leadership skills. They assist the physical education teacher in a variety of ways which include but are not limited to: leading warm-ups, equipment set up, officiating and the development of skills.

PRE-CADET LEADERSHIP CLASS
Grades: 10, 11
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Application and consent of Pre-Cadet instructor
Course Number: 563020

Content: This course is a comprehensive program focusing on: positive leadership skills; skills needed to assist the physical education instructor and students in class; learning the rules and skills to participate and officiate in the various activities offered at the high school level. After completion of the class the student is required to be a cadet Leader for minimum of 1 semester during their junior/senior year.

STRENGTH, AGILITY, AND CONDITIONING
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5 or 1.0
Length: Semester or Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 564121
And/or Semester B: 564122

Content: This course may include, but not limited to: strength training, agility and fitness. Strength training will include Olympic and sport specific lifting, as well as programs tailored to the individual student. Conditioning and agility will include cardiovascular, flexibility training, water activities, coordination and balance training. Students will also be given the opportunity to cooperate with the instructor to develop training plans based on their individual needs and goals.

TEAM SPORTS
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: .5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 564221
Or Semester B: 564222

Content: This course is designed for the physical education student that is interested in participating in various team sports. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the rules and regulations of each sport, and more in-depth strategies of each sport. Students will also be working on physical fitness through the components of skill related fitness (agility, balance, coordination, power, and reaction time and speed). The following sports may be covered, but are not limited to: soccer, speedball, flag football, zone football, team handball, volleyball, swim activities, softball, basketball, mat ball, floor hockey, bowling, tennis, ultimate, etc.


SCIENCE

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources ~ Health Science ~ Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
TC Anatomy and Physiology – Year   R R R
Aerospace Engineering (PLTW and MSOE) (ES)   R/ES R/ES R/ES
Anatomy and Physiology I   R R R
Anatomy and Physiology II   R R R
TC Animal Science (ES) R/ES R/ES R/ES R/ES
AP Biology   R R R
AP Chemistry   R R R
AP Environmental Science   R R R
TC AP Physics I   R R R
AP Physics II   R R R
Applied Microbiology   R R R
Articulated Genetics    R R R
Biology R R R R
Biology – Honors R R R R
TC Chemistry R R R R
TC Chemistry, Pre-AP R R R R
Earth Science I     R R
Earth Science II     R R
TC Forensic Science     R R
Genetics I   R R R
Genetics II   R R R
Human Body Systems (PLTW and MSOE)   R R R
Introduction to Veterinary Science (ES)   R R R
Medical Microbiology   R R R
Medical Interventions (PLTW and MSOE)   R R R
TC Microbiology – Year   R R R
Physical Science   R R R
TC Physics   R R R
TC Plant Science (ES) R/ES R/ES R/ES R/ES
Principles of Engineering (PLTW and MSOE) (ES)   R/ES R/ES R/ES
Principles of Biomedical Science (PLTW and MSOE) R R R R

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science*
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)
A student can earn up to one equivalent science (ES) credit toward requirements for graduation.

BTC LOGO

TC ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY –YEAR
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Biology, Biology - Honors, or AP Biology
Course Number: 586420

Content: Students will complete a detailed unit on human tissues, and will study the structure and function of each of the 11 human body systems (skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, integumentary, nervous, urinary, endocrine, lymphoid, and reproductive). Students will participate in data-collection labs using Vernier sensors and software, and will complete dissections of representative mammal specimens. Students will learn medical terminology relevant to each unit, and will complete a comprehensive project each semester.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Craig – Semester (A or B)
Parker –Semester A only
Prerequisites: Biology, Biology Honors, or AP Biology
Course Number: Semester A: 586121
Or Semester B: 586122

Content: During this course, students will examine the structure and complex functioning of the human body. Students will complete a unit on human tissues, and will begin a detailed analysis of human body systems. Students will participate in data collection laboratory activities, small dissections, and relevant projects related to the systems being studied.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Craig – Semester (A or B)
Parker – Semester B only
Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I
Course Number: Semester A: 586221
Or Semester B: 586222

Content: During this course, students will examine the structure and complex functioning of the human body. Students will participate in a detailed analysis of several human body systems. Students will complete lab activities including a detailed dissection of a representative mammal.

BTC LOGO

TC ANIMAL SCIENCE ES
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 621521
Or Semester B: 621522

Content: This course is designed to give students an advanced knowledge of production animals and the science that is surrounding the industry. Students will learn about the structural functions of reproduction, digestion, nervous, muscular and endocrine systems. Students will gain an understanding of technical areas such as growth hormones, artificial insemination, embryo transfer, heat synchronization, and cloning to improve efficient livestock production. Science based inquiry, group collaboration in problem solving, and hands-on laboratories activities will be included. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities. TC Animal Science ES will meet one semester of college entrance science requirements at University of Wisconsin Schools.
This course is also offered under Agriculture Sciences.

AP BIOLOGY
Grades: 10,11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: TC Chemistry or TC Pre-AP Chemistry
Course Number: 582320

Content: The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college biology course usually taken by life science majors during their first year. The goal of this course is the development of a conceptual framework for studying modern biology. Content will be covered at a rigorous pace, and laboratory work will stimulate scientific inquiry and critical thinking. The course curriculum will stress an understanding of molecular biology as a unifying theme and an emphasis on evolutionary biology will permeate our yearlong curriculum. Additionally, cytology, genetics, mechanisms of evolution, ecology, plant/animal form and function will be covered. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP CHEMISTRY
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math III and TC Chemistry or Pre-AP Chemistry
Course Number: 583220

Content: This is a demanding college-level course. Topics include atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, physical and chemical changes, thermodynamics, reaction rates, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I, 2.0 credits in Science and/or Agriculture
Course Number: 623230

Content: AP Environmental Science will provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.
This course is also offered under Agriculture Sciences.

BTC LOGO

TC AP PHYSICS I
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math II
Course Number: 584120

Content: AP Physics I is an introductory, algebra-based STEM course. The course covers motion; work, energy, and power; mechanical waves, and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. Students will gain knowledge through class discussion, problem solving, and laboratory activities. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP PHYSICS II
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Physics or AP Physics I
Course Number: 584220

Content: AP Physics II is a continuation of the topics covered in AP Physics I. This course will cover fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; atomic and nuclear physics. Students will gain knowledge through class discussion, problem solving, and laboratory activities. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Biology or equivalent, or consent of instructor
Course Number: Semester A: 582521
Or Semester B: 582522

Content: Students will develop the skills and lab techniques required to research bacteria. Multiple lab investigations, including cultivation and isolation are required so that students can independently identify bacterial species. These techniques can be applied in biotechnology fields of research such as cancer research, genetic recombination therapy, and industrial applications.

PIE LOGO

TC ARTICULATED GENETICS *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Biology or Biology Honors
Course Number: 585321

Content: will cover the same material offered in Genetics I and II. Some of the topics to be discussed include: Inheritance, DNA, RNA, Protein Synthesis, Genetic Disorders, Biotechnology, and populations. Upon the completion of Articulated Genetics, students may earn three college credits which will be accepted at many of the University of Wisconsin campuses. A student must have received a ‘B’ or better in Biology. Students will be responsible for paying for the tuition, which is about one third of the cost as an undergraduate (approximately $300).

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: IED and Integrated Math II
Course Number: 782120

Content: The major focus of the Aerospace Engineering course is to expose students to the world of aeronautics, flight and engineering. Students will be introduced to the Project Lead the Way activity-based, project-based, and problem-based learning through exploring the world of aerospace engineering. Students should have experience in physics, mathematics and technology education. They will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of aerospace problems.
This course is also offered under Technology Education.

BIOLOGY
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 582120

Content: This introductory survey course is designed to help the student develop a better understanding of living things and of life functions. Units studied include the nature of science, cells and cell processes, ecology, nature of DNA, genetics, reproduction and development, evolution and the change of species over time, and biodiversity.

BIOLOGY – HONORS
Grades: 9, 10, 11 ,12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 582020

Content: This course is designed to help the student develop a better understanding of living things and of life functions. Units studied include experimental design, cells and cell processes, ecology, nature of DNA, genetics, reproduction and development, evolution and the change of species over time, animal diversity and physiology. Topics are examined in greater depth than in the general Biology course.

BTC LOGO

TC CHEMISTRY
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I
Course Number: 583010

Content: The main topics studied are the metric system, problem solving, matter, atomic structure, bonding, the periodic table, periodic relationships, chemical equations, kinetic molecular theory, gas laws, solutions, acids, bases and salts. A solid Algebra background is necessary to comprehend the math concepts in this course. Chemistry is recommended for careers in health, as well as careers requiring a technical or technological background.

BTC LOGO

TC CHEMISTRY, PRE AP
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math I
Course Number: 583120

Content: The main topics studied are the metric system, problem solving, matter, atomic structure, bonding, the periodic table, periodic relationships, chemical equations, kinetic molecular theory, gas laws, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases and salts. Faster pacing of chemical topics will include a more in depth study of equilibrium and acid & base topics. A solid Algebra background is necessary to comprehend the math concepts in this course. This course is designed for students planning to take AP Chemistry or pursue a science career. Chemistry is recommended for career in health, as well as careers requiring a technical or technological background.

EARTH SCIENCE I
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 586011
Or Semester B: 586012

Content: The Earth Science course is designed to give a better understanding of our planet and universe. It gives an introduction to several areas that may be of interest as career choices. Topics studied during the first semester (Earth Science I) are geology, astronomy, mineralogy, plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanoes. Second semester (Earth Science II) topics are cartography, oceanography, and meteorology.

EARTH SCIENCE II
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 586021
Or Semester B: 586022

Content: The Earth Science course is designed to give a better understanding of our planet and universe. It gives an introduction to several areas that may be of interest as career choices. Topics studied during the first semester (Earth Science I) are geology, astronomy, mineralogy, plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanoes. Second semester (Earth Science II) topics are cartography, oceanography, and meteorology.

BTC LOGO

TC FORENSIC SCIENCE
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Physical Science or Chemistry AND Biology
Course Number: Semester A: 586321
Or Semester B: 586322

Content: This course is designed to introduce the science of solving crimes. Students will apply science and math principles to the analysis of the following forms of evidence: fingerprinting, blood spatter analysis, ballistics, trace evidence collection and crime scene investigation. The content will be relevant, engaging, explorative, and very hands-on.

GENETICS I
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Biology
Course Number: Semester A: 585021
Or Semester B: 585022

Content: During this course, students will concentrate on one of the units in general biology - genetics. DNA, RNA, protein synthesis, mitosis, and meiosis will be reviewed and expanded upon. Problems involving the various patterns of inheritance will be solved by using pedigrees, Punnett squares, and the laws of probability. There is an emphasis is on human genetics. Genetic disorders will be studied along with genetic screening and counseling.

GENETICS II
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Biology and Genetics I
Course Number: Semester A: 585031
Or Semester B: 585032

Content: The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the importance genes play in our health. In addition, students will develop an appreciation for gene therapies and technologies which have the potential to greatly improve quality of life. The genetics of cancer and heart disease will be explored in depth. Technologies involving cloning, stem cells, gene therapy, forensics, and genetic counseling will be expanded upon. Labs, projects, case studies, Internet assignments, problem-solving, ethical role-playing, and reading guides will be used to reinforce these concepts.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS
(PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Principles of Biomedical Science and Biology
Course Number: 586110

Content: This course allows students to examine the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal mannequin, work through interesting real world cases and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries

INTRODUCTION TO VETERINARY SCIENCE (ES)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Completion of Small Animal Care & Management I or TC Animal Science ES
Course Number: Semester A: 622021
Or Semester B: 622022

Content: This course is designed for students who have a sincere interest in a career related to small animals. Students planning to become a veterinarian, small animal technician, animal scientist, or animal researcher, then this course is highly recommended. Topics to be discussed include medical terminology, anatomy, careers, safety, health, reproduction, scientific research and animal welfare. Each student will complete hands on veterinary skills including weighing an animal, diagnosis and administering a treatment, cleaning, clipping, grooming, and practicing mock surgery procedures. A school or community animal awareness project will be developed and facilitated through the course. Students can expect to take part in FFA activities.
This course is also offered under Agriculture Sciences.

MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Biology or equivalent, or consent of instructor
Course Number: Semester A: 582621
Or Semester B: 582622

Content: This course focuses on viruses to start with, and includes a survey of infectious diseases caused by both viruses and bacteria. Units will also include epidemiology, microbe host interactions, the immune response, HIV, bio-weapons, and a survey of systemic infections. Students should expect to develop an understanding of infectious diseases and the prevention/control of its spread.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Human Body Systems
Course Number: 582631/582632

Content: Students follow the life of a fictitious family as they investigate how to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. Students explore how to detect and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; evaluate cancer treatment options; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through real-world cases, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics.

BTC LOGO

TC MICROBIOLOGY – YEAR
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Physical Science or TC Chemistry AND Biology, Biology Honors, or AP Biology
Course Number: 582720

Content: Students can expect to experience the same curriculum as the Applied and Medical Microbiology courses. This articulated course with BTC provides students with additional study in antimicrobials that the separate classes do not offer.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE
Grade: 10
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 581120

Content: This math-based curriculum covers introductory concepts of chemistry and physics. Chemistry topics include measurement, tools of science including the scientific method, matter (physical and chemical properties and changes, classification and structure), and chemical reactions. Physics topics include forces (related to motion, work and power, energy, heat, electricity and magnetism) and waves (characteristics, light and sound).

BTC LOGO

TC PHYSICS
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Integrated Math II
Course Number: 584110

Content: Physics aids students in synthesizing the fundamental concepts and principles concerning matter and energy through the laboratory study of kinematics, dynamics, vectors, wave motion, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and relativistic mechanics. Students have opportunities to: 1) acquire an awareness of the history of physics and its role in the birth of technology, 2) explore the uses of its models, theories, and laws in its various careers, and 3) investigate physics questions, discover and apply principles, and strengthen problem solving skills.

BTC LOGO

TC PLANT SCIENCE ES
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester B
Prerequisites: None - Introduction to Agriculture recommended.
Course Number: Semester B: 621622

Content: Students will study the processes involved in plant growth, production and reproduction. The functions of plant structures, as well as crop production, will also be studied. Genetic improvement of plants, plant diseases, plant cultural practices and harvest of crops will be explored in detail. There will be various identifications of crops, weeds and seeds. Students will work in the school greenhouse to complete lab activities. (Students planning to use this course to meet college entrance science requirements should verify its acceptance with the intended college.) Students can expect to take part in FFA activities. Plant Science ES will meet one semester of college entrance science requirements at University of Wisconsin Schools.
This course is also offered under Agriculture Sciences.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING
(PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 581620

Content: Are you interested in applying your math and science skills through a mix of hands-on and academic activities? Principles of Engineering are designed to introduce students to the fundamental skill sets necessary to be a successful engineer. Utilizing technology to design experiments, students will fabricate products which meet specific industry requirements. Students may also participate in case studies and team projects.
This course is also offered under Technology Education.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE (PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Biology (can be taken at the same time as this class)
Course Number: 582610

Content: This course provides an introduction to the biomedical sciences through hands-on projects and problems. Students investigate concepts of biology and medicine using a case study approach. They will determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional woman as they sequentially piece together evidence found in her medical history and her autopsy report.


SOCIAL STUDIES

Government & Public Administration ~ Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
AP European History     R R
AP Human Geography R R R R
AS AP Psychology     R R
AP United States History   R R R
AP US Government and Politics     R R
AP World History: Modern R R R R
Contemporary Issues (Parker HS Only)     R R
AS Economics     R R
Global Studies R      
Global Studies – Honors R      
History Through Art I (Parker HS Only) E E E E
History Through Art II (Parker HS Only) E E E E
Humanities A (Craig HS Only)     R R
Humanities B (Craig HS Only)     R R
Multicultural American History R R R R
AS Psychology     R R
AS Sociology     R R
United States History   R R R
World Civilizations R R R R
Young Historians (Parker HS Only) E E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
*There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 603240

Content: This course is a college-level study of Europe from 1450 to the present. It focuses on cultural, economic, political, and social developments. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 602320

Content: AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s surface. Students will learn the impact humans have, not only on the Earth, but also on each other, including the study of world population issues, border disputes, international conflicts, urban development, environmental consequences, and pandemic disease. Students will study culture, economics, world religions, the origins and diffusion of languages, industrialization, rural land use, city planning, and geographic tools. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

BTC LOGO

AS AP PSYCHOLOGY
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 604420

Content: Advanced Placement Psychology is a course that introduces students to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes in humans and animals. Units of study include history, foundations and careers, critical scientific thinking and statistical reasoning, neurobiology, nature, nurture and human diversity, development, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, thinking and language, intelligence, motivation and emotion, theories of personality, psychological disorders and therapy, stress and health, and social psychology. Students will study the entire college curriculum before the Advanced Placement exam in May. The focus of the course is to foster critical thinking and an understanding of human behavior that allows the individual the opportunity to create healthier relationships throughout the life span. Students can expect to participate in activities that incorporate community resources and active participation as a means of making direct connections between their studies and relationships. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 603220

Content: A college-level chronological study of United States history from pre-colonial America to the present. Students will be expected to meet college-level class performance expectations, e.g., extensive reading, writing, class participation, and discussion. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

* AP US GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 604720

Content: This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam in US Government and Politics. The course focuses on the federal government: Congress, Presidency, Judiciary, Bureaucracy, and the constitution and political culture. Students will complete the preparatory work for the Advanced Placement test in US Government & Politics. Students will also complete an in-depth research topic concerning a public policy issue. To complete their research students will be required to take a day-long field study to Madison, WI or a week-long field study to Washington DC. The price of the field studies is dependent on student participation. Contact a seminar teacher for current information. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP WORLD HISTORY: MODERN
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 603230

Content: The Advanced Placement World History: Modern course is designed to prepare students for the AP World History: Modern Exam. Students will investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods from approximately 1200 C.E. to the present. Students will be expected to read college level texts, as well as develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; making historical comparisons; utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time; and developing historical arguments. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (Parker HS Only)
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 604021
Or Semester B: 604022

Content: This course will ask students to examine and investigate major contemporary issues affecting Americans in the 21st Century. While addressing constitutional foundations and the operations of representative government, current issues along with their political, economic, and social implications will also be stressed. The purpose of the course is to help students become informed voters by improving their knowledge of how the U.S. Government functions as well as current issues.

BTC LOGO

AS ECONOMICS
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 604121
Or Semester B: 604122

Content: Economics is the study of how individuals and societies decide to use scarce resources in order to satisfy their unlimited wants. This course, which is geared to the student interested in acquiring a basic understanding of how our economic system works, is beneficial to students interested in business, personal finance, and political decision making. Concepts that are covered include supply and demand relationships, production, consumption, banking, labor, fiscal and monetary policy, and the impact of international trade on world economics. A basic mathematical background is necessary to understand the models utilized in instruction.

GLOBAL STUDIES
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 602120

Content: Students will gain an appreciation for those who live as our neighbors both far and near. Such an understanding is rooted in an investigation of geographic, historic, economic, anthropologic, and the political nature of the world’s numerous and diverse cultures. There will be an emphasis on human and physical geography.
A regional and topical approach to the investigation of our world is the intent of the course. The course content will include the study of the fundamentals of geography and elements of culture in the investigation of many regions of the world.

GLOBAL STUDIES – HONORS
Grade: 9
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 602020

Content: This course is designed for students who enjoy the challenge of studying places in the world and developing a deeper understanding of the forces behind today’s events. The course deals with analyzing the five themes of geography as applied to a chosen country or region. Especially important will be the fundamentals of economic development, climatology and/or geomorphology, and map and graph skills.

HISTORY THROUGH ART I (Parker HS Only)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 648121
Or Semester B: 648122

Content: History Through Art I will allow students to study world history from Prehistory to the Middle Ages through the study of the major paintings, sculptures and architecture of those times. Students will participate in discussions/activities comparing and contrasting both Western and non-Western art. Civilizations, religions and political and social events will be studied as related to the emergence of new forms and movements in art. Students have the option to take this class and History Through Art II as prerequisites to AP Art History.
This course is also offered under Arts.

HISTORY THROUGH ART II (Parker HS Only)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 648221
Or Semester B: 648222

Content: History Through Art II will allow students to study world history from the Renaissance to the Modern Era through the study of the major paintings, sculptures and architecture of those times. Students will participate in discussions/activities comparing and contrasting both Western and Non-western art. Civilizations, religions and political and social events will be studied as related to the emergence of new forms and movements in art. Students have the option to take this class and History Through Art I as prerequisites to AP Art History.
This course is also offered under Arts.

HUMANITIES A (Craig HS Only)
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 604821
Or Semester B: 604822

Content: This course will teach the concepts of change, honor, beauty, justice, peace and quality. This course is not a prerequisite for Humanities B. This is a study of people utilizing the ideas of psychology, sociology, anthropology, history, economics, art and literature. Humanities are about life and the human perspective. This course does not utilize a textbook. Concepts are covered in a variety of ways including film, group projects, class discussion, guest speakers and primary source documents. Community service is an expectation of the course.

HUMANITIES B (Craig HS Only)
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 604921
Or Semester B: 604922

Content: This course will teach the concepts of think, truth, power, work, death and love. Humanities B can be taken without having taken Humanities A. This is a study of people utilizing the ideas of psychology, sociology, anthropology, history, economics, art and literature. Humanities are about life and the human perspective. This course does not utilize a textbook. Concepts are covered in a variety of ways including film, group projects, class discussion, guest speakers and primary source documents. Community service is an expectation of the course.

MULTICULTURAL AMERICAN HISTORY
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 603321
Or Semester B: 603322

Content: This course examines the history of minority groups within the United States. Students will become familiar with the background, culture, contributions, and achievements of African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans. Students will also investigate the prejudice and discrimination that each group has endured. They will discover how a minority groups past affects it’s present and future as well. In addition, students will discuss and debate current topics including ethnic stereotypes, affirmative action, immigration, racial profiling, and hate crimes. Students enrolled in the course will consider issues of historical significance which are relevant to the ever-changing world we live in today.

BTC LOGO

AS PSYCHOLOGY
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 604321
Or Semester B: 604322

Content: This course is designed to provide the individual with a survey of the field of psychology and the related areas of experimentation, personality development, mental health, learning, conformity, physiology, coping and adjustment mechanisms. Investigations into social psychology and societal problems. Upon completion of the course, the students will have gained insight into themselves, and will have enhanced their understanding of the complexity of human behavior.

BTC LOGO

AS SOCIOLOGY
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 604521
Or Semester B: 604522

Content: Throughout this course, students will develop a sense of connection to society and how that connection impacts and is impacted by social forces. Students will look for social causes to behavior and the behavior of others such as racial, gender, and age discrimination. Special attention will be given to the sociological institutions of education, government, religion and family as they relate to social development.

UNITED STATES HISTORY
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 603020

Content: This course surveys United States history from the Progressive Era (1900) to the present emphasizing the interconnectedness of events and people. Additional attention is placed on the constitution era and the study of state and local government.
 

WORLD CIVILIZATIONS
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 602520

Content: This course is a survey of modern world history from approximately 1400 to the modern era. Students will gain a greater understanding of world civilizations as they explore the political, social, economic, cultural, and geographic trends and events of modern world history.

YOUNG HISTORIANS Parker HS Only)
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 602011

Content: This course is designed to train students in the craft of historical research and presentation necessary for participation in the National History Day (NHD) competition. The course promotes 21st Century skills by utilizing modern research methods and technology to promote the study of history. Students will learn to present their findings in historical papers, museum-style exhibits, original dramatic performances, multimedia documentaries, or interactive websites. Students choosing to participate in NHD competitions will be responsible for charges and fees.


TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

Architecture & Construction ~ Information Technology ~ Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics ~ Arts, A/V Technology & Communications ~ Manufacturing ~ Transportation, Distribution & Logistics

 

Technology

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Advanced Communications & Multi-Media Production     E E
Aerospace Engineering (PLTW and MSOE) (ES)   R/ES R/ES R/ES
Civil Engineering & Architecture (PLTW and MSOE)   E E E
Computer Integrated Manufacturing (PLTW and MSOE)   E E E
Digital Electronics (PLTW and MSOE) (EM)   R/EM R/EM R/EM
Engineering Design & Development (PLTW and MSOE)     E E
Graphic & Electronic Communication Processes *   E E E
Graphic & Electronic Communication Systems * E E E E
Graphic & Electronic Communication Technology * E E E E
Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW and MSOE) E E E E
Introduction to Mechatronic Systems E E E E
Principles of Engineering (PLTW and MSOE) (ES)   R/ES R/ES R/ES
Robotics, Engineering and Programming E E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
AP = Advanced Placement
AS = Advanced Standing
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
*There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS & MULTI-MEDIA PRODUCTION
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Graphic & Electronic Communication Processes
Course Number: 781320

Content: This course which of in-depth individual study in the areas of Graphic Arts and Electronic Communication. This course is designed to assist students that have an interest in or are pursuing a career in the Graphic Arts or Electronic Communications field. Each student and the instructor discuss and decide which avenues the student will follow for the year. Each student’s plan will be individually based to best assist them after graduation. The areas of study can be with any of the available technology in the class. The length of time and final outcome of each student’s topic will be decided jointly by the student and instructor. Students will be allowed to repeat this previously taken higher level course. The student will work on advanced Tech. Ed. projects within the chosen medium area. A special course of study will be developed by the instructor to meet the student’s needs in the development of the Tech. Ed. area s/he has chosen. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
(PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: IED and Integrated Math II
Course Number: 782120

Content: The major focus of the Aerospace Engineering course is to expose students to the world of aeronautics, flight and engineering. Students will be introduced to the Project Lead the Way activity-based, project-based, and problem-based learning through exploring the world of aerospace engineering. Students should have experience in physics, mathematics and technology education. They will employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of aerospace problems.
This course is also offered under Science.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

CIVIL ENGINEERING & ARCHITECTURE
(PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: IED and Integrated Math II
Course Number: 782130

Content: The major focus of this course is completing long-term projects that involve the development of property sites. As students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture, they apply what they learn to the design and development of a property. The course provides teachers and students freedom to develop the property as a simulation or to students to model the experiences that civil engineers and architects face. Students work in teams, exploring hands-on activities and projects to learn the characteristics of civil engineering and architecture. In addition, students use 3D design software to help them design solutions to solve major course projects. Students learn about documenting their project, solving problems, and communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community of civil engineering and architecture.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING
(PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10,11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: IED
Course Number: 784130

Content: Manufactured items are part of everyday life, and in this course, students will be introduced to the high-tech, innovative nature of modern manufacturing. At the same time, students will learn about the manufacturing processor, product design, robotics, and automation. Students can earn a virtual manufacturing badge recognized by the National Manufacturing Badge System.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
(EM, PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: IED and Integrated Math I
Course Number: 782220

Content: Digital Electronics introduces students to the fundamentals and applications of digital electronics, programmable logic controls, and the application of electronic circuits and devices. Students will design and test digital circuitry through a blend of hands-on and academic activities.
This course is also offered under Mathematics.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

ENGINEERING DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT
(PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: IED, POE and at least one other PLTW engineering course
Course Number: 782030

Content: The knowledge and skills students acquire throughout PLTW Engineering courses come together in Engineering Design & Development as they identify an issue and then research, design, and test a solution, ultimately presenting their solution to a panel of engineers. Students apply the professional skills they have developed to document a design process to standards, completing Engineering Design & Development ready to take on post-secondary program or career.

GRAPHIC & ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION PROCESSES *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Graphic & Electronic Communication Systems
Course Number: 781220

Content: This is a yearlong course which consists of in-depth study of the areas in Graphic and Electronic Communication. The students will choose from a list of related activities. The length of time on any one topic will be determined by the number of topics selected jointly by students and the instructor. Choices include:

  •  Audio/Video
  •  Scanning
  •  Photography
  •  Desktop Publishing
  •  Screen Printing
  •  Computer Graphics
  •  Word Processing
  •  CAD System
  •  AV Presentations
  •  Lasers
  •  Drafting
  •  Robotics
  •  Graphic Layout
  •  I Movie
  •  Laser Engraving and others currently being developed.

GRAPHIC & ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Graphic & Electronic Communication Technology
Course Number: Semester A: 781221
Or Semester B: 781222

Content: Students participate in learning activities that focus on audio and visual communication systems. Emphasis is on problem solving and practical application of graphic art and electronic communication principles. Students will expand their knowledge of technology by producing in-depth work related to video and audio production, graphic design, desktop publishing, computer aided design (CAD), screen printing, problem solving, photography, digital scanning, digital laser engraving, animation and solid modeling.

GRAPHIC & ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 781021
Or Semester B: 781022

Content: Communication Technology is the first class in a series of communication courses that focus on graphic arts. This course is basic and exploratory in nature. It involves a hands-on approach to learning with most of the class time spent on problem solving activities. Students will work to develop an individualized portfolio involving the following areas: design and layout - computer graphics, desktop publishing, photography, audio/video production, screen-printing, and lasers. Software that will be used will include Adobe: Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and Microsoft Suite.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN
(PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 782020

Content: This course is designed to introduce students to the design process and the tools used in product development. Students enrolled in Introduction to Engineering Design will learn through first-hand experience the activities that engineers engage in throughout the design cycle. Development of design briefs, sketching, 3D solid modeling and prototyping will provide the foundation for activities in Introduction to Engineering Design.

INTRODUCTION TO MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 582831
Or Semester B: 582832

Content: Learning comes to life as students are introduced to the rapidly evolving world of advanced manufacturing. While applying prior learning in technology, math and science, students gain knowledge, in a hands-on environment, that introduces the fundamentals of mechatronics and advanced manufacturing, including electricity, electric relay control, measurement, mechanical drives, performance metrics, control systems, organization, print reading and safety. Ideal for students interested in careers in industry, engineering, computer science and data analytics pathways.

PLTW Logo
MOSE Logo

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING
(PLTW, MSOE)
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: IED
Course Number: 581620

Content: Are you interested in applying your math and science skills through a mix of hands-on and academic activities? Principles of Engineering is a course designed to introduce students to the fundamental skill sets necessary to be a successful engineer. Using technology to design experiments, students will fabricate products which meet specific industry requirements. Students may also participate in case studies and team projects.
This course is also offered under Science.

ROBOTICS, ENGINEERING, AND PROGRAMMING
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 681320
Content: Robotics, Engineering, and Programming is an exciting class to allow students to feel comfortable with the new and sometimes very complicated concepts. To build an autonomous robot, students must learn the basic concepts of computer programming, design, electrics, engineering, and mechanics.

Construction

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Advanced Construction Student House Build *     E E
Construction Processes *   E E E
Construction Systems * E E E E
Construction Technology * E E E E
Introduction to Theater Design and Construction * E E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level AS = Advanced Standing 
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
AP = Advanced Placement
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION STUDENT HOUSE BUILD *
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 3.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Any Technology Education Class. Application required
Course Number: 783320

Content: This course combines classroom instruction with practical application in a residential home construction project. Students will be “on-site” completing the construction of a home through a partnership with the South Central Wisconsin Builders Association and the School District of Janesville. Students will learn concrete, framing, insulation techniques, energy saving procedures, green building techniques, electrical, interior and exterior finishes and will be involved with every aspect of a home construction project. Students will have opportunities to work side by side with professionals in the building trades in a “hands on” setting. Upon completion of the house, it will be put on the market and sold. Students will be required to transport themselves to and from the jobsite daily. Students will be allowed to repeat this previously taken higher level course. The student will work on advanced Tech. Ed. projects within the chosen medium area. A special course of study will be developed by the instructor to meet the student’s needs in the development of the Tech. Ed. area s/he has chosen. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

CONSTRUCTION PROCESSES *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Construction Systems
Course Number: 783220

Content: A yearlong course which consists of an in-depth study in the areas of woodworking, carpentry and architecture. Group and individual work activities will consist of material estimating, floor plan design, framing techniques, interior and exterior material application, energy conservation techniques, and career opportunities. Students will design a project which will include a bill of materials and a plan. Students will complete projects utilizing the construction techniques learned in class.

CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Construction Technology
Course Number: Semester A: 783121
Or Semester B: 783122

Content: This course introduces students to the broad area of carpentry, with an emphasis on residential construction. This may include wall framing, roof rafters, brick laying, plumbing, and electrical. Students will create projects reinforcing the skills learned in construction technology.

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 783021
Or Semester B: 783022

Content: This course provides students with a general introduction to construction and woodworking. This course is basic and exploratory in nature. It involves a hands-on approach to learning. Students will operate hand and power tools used in the construction and woodworking industries. Students will construct products dealing with architecture, residential construction, woodworking, and mass production.
 

INTRODUCTION TO THEATER DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION *
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 783521

Content: Introduction to Theater Design and Construction will expose students to set design and construction as well as theatrical lighting and sound in this hands-on class. Students will be making the sets and props for the current musical/theatrical productions as well as working with sounds and lighting for the shows. This course may be taken multiple academic years for credit.
This course is also offered under Music.

Manufacturing

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Advanced Manufacturing *     E E
AS Machine Metals *   E E E
Manufacturing Systems * E E E E
Manufacturing Technology * E E E E
AS Welding *   E E E
Welding Fabrication *   E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level AS = Advanced Standing 
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
AP = Advanced Placement
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING *
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Machine Metals or Welding Fabrication
Course Number: 784520

Content: Students will plan, design and develop independent projects using the entire lab and instructional resources. This course is geared to meet the needs of the individual student. Students are required to develop advance skills in machine operation and welding to solve more difficult problems while working to meet industry standards. Advanced projects will be made using multiple machines in the manufacturing lab. These machines could include: Lathes, Milling Machines, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines and Welders. The students can then assemble the parts produced into a useful product. The student will work on advanced Tech. Ed. projects within the chosen medium area. A special course of study will be developed by the instructor to meet the student’s needs in the development of the Tech. Ed. area s/he has chosen. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

BTC LOGO

AS MACHINE METALS *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Manufacturing Systems
Course Number: Semester A: 784221
Or Semester B: 784222

Content: Machine Metals covers the procedures involved in converting metal stock into a variety of shapes and sizes. These procedures include the use of metal lathes, milling machines, surface grinders and drilling to specification on a blueprint. Students will be introduced to the functions of a CNC machine. The students can then assemble the parts produced into a useful product.

MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Manufacturing Technology
Course Number: Semester A: 784121
Or Semester B: 784122

Content: Students will build goods and products from raw materials. Students will read blueprints and use precision measurement tools to accurately form the materials needed to create a finished good or product. Students will work with hand tools, understand decimal equivalents and tap and die charts and will apply themselves to machining of metal, welding, and sheet metal.

MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 784021
Or Semester B: 784022

Content: This class provides students with a general introduction to material processing of manufactured goods and products. Students will work with hand tools and operate basic machine tools used in the machining industry. Students will also learn to use precision measurement tools, hand tools, and operate machine tools such as lathes and milling machines. Students will gain experience with stick welding, and sheet metal development in this course. Students will construct several projects using blueprints and a combination of hand and machine tools. Students will learn SMAW welding processes, and develop a project from sheet metal.

BTC LOGO

AS WELDING *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Manufacturing Systems
Course Number: Semester A: 784321
Or Semester B: 784322

Content: This course is an introduction that provides a foundation of hands on learning by applying knowledge related to the welding process. Welding is an efficient, dependable, flexible, and economical means of fabrication. Students will study the principles and practices of SMAW, GTAW, GMAW, FCAW, Oxyacetylene cutting operations, and Plasma Arc Cutting. This will be achieved through lecture, demonstrations, and in lab practice.
 

WELDING FABRICATION *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Welding
Course Number: Semester A: 784421
Or Semester B: 784422

Content: Students will continue their exploration and skill building through activities that involve welding processes from the first level course. Students will learn welding math, interpret drawings, sketches and welding symbols. Students will participate in a mass production welding project, which will further acquaint them with different machines in the shop. Students will then make their own independent project (with Instructors permission for safety purposes).

Transportation

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
AS Advanced Automotive *     E E
AS Automotive Processes *   E E E
Automotive Systems * E E E E
Transportation Technology * E E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level AS = Advanced Standing 
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
AP = Advanced Placement
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

BTC LOGO

AS ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE *
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Automotive Processes
Course Number: 785320

Content: This course focuses on the detailed operation and service of the following automotive systems: total electrical system, emissions, engine diagnosis, mechanical repair, steering and suspension, brakes and drive train. Students will also experience and builds skills in the auto body field, including prep –bondo (mudding) to paint. Note: A contract project is required (4-9weeks) as a part of the class. It is signed by student/teacher and must be completed to obtain grade. Students will work on advanced Tech. Ed. projects within the chosen medium area. A special course of study will be developed by the instructor to meet the student’s needs in the development of the Tech. Ed. area s/he has chosen. This course option may be repeated for additional credits.

BTC LOGO


 

AS AUTOMOTIVE PROCESSES *
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Automotive Systems
Course Number: 785220

Content: This course will expand on previous areas of instruction in the automotive field. It is the second course that deals entirely with the automobile. Students will learn and perform services that deal with engine processes, electrical systems, suspension systems, brake systems, axles and transmissions, and intro auto body.
 

AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: Transportation Technology
Course Number: Semester A: 785121
Or Semester B: 785122

Content: This first automotive course focuses on cars. Students will learn about and work on all the systems within the vehicle ignition, fuel, cooling, lubrication, exhaust, brakes, suspension, and wheels and tires. Students will disassemble and reassemble engine components and perform basic service and maintenance checks. Students will also be able to perform many of the hands-on performances on their own vehicles!
 

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY *
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: Semester A: 785021
Or Semester B: 785022

Content: Students will work on and learn about vehicles and engines used for land, air, and water transportation industries. Students will design, build and operate several different kinds of vehicles, which may include (steam powered boats, mousetrap drag car, boomerangs, etc.) Students will also disassemble, diagnose, repair, and reassemble a small 4-stroke gasoline engine.

 

Industrial Coop Education

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
Industrial COOP/Education (I.C.E.) – (Parker HS Only)     E E
Industrial COOP/Education (I.C.E.) – Job Site (Parker HS Only)     E E

E = Elective for Grade Level AS = Advanced Standing 
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
AP = Advanced Placement
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

INDUSTRIAL COOP/EDUCATION (I.C.E.) – CLASSROOM (Parker HS Only)
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Two courses in Technology Education and Instructor Consent. Application and interview required.
Course Number: 787120

Content: The I.C.E. classroom phase is a course intended to go hand in hand with the I.C.E. work phase of the program. The classroom phase deals with all aspects of the world of work students will someday encounter. In the classroom, students will learn: job seeking skills, employer/co-worker relations, ways to obtain job promotions, how to research various careers, and other important aspects of how to get a job, keep it, and become successful in a career.

INDUSTRIAL COOP/EDUCATION (I.C.E.) – JOB SITE (Parker HS Only)
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in I.C.E. Classroom and Instructor Consent. Application Required
Course Number: 787220

Content: In this course, the student works in a job related to his/her career objective. The student is trained and evaluated by the employer. Students receive one credit for work experience. Students signing up for Industrial COOP work must also sign up for the I.C.E. classroom phase. Students will be released early from school each day for on-the-job training, and work at their selected job site approximately 15-20 hours per week
*2nd year COOP students must work towards a state skills certificate in one of the areas we cover.
COOP requirements include: weekly work logs and quarterly employer completed evaluations.


WORLD LANGUAGE

 

COURSE TITLE 9TH GRADE 10TH GRADE 11TH GRADE 12TH GRADE
AP Chinese       E
AP French       E
AP Spanish       E
Chinese I E E E E
Chinese II E E E E
Chinese III E E E E
Chinese IV - Honors   E E E
Chinese V - Honors     E E
French I E E E E
French II E E E E
French III   E E E
French IV - Honors     E E
French V - Honors       E
Spanish I E E E E
Spanish II E E E E
Spanish III   E E E
Spanish IV - Honors     E E
Spanish V - Honors       E
Spanish for Heritage Speakers I – Honors E E E E
Spanish for Heritage Speakers II – Honors   E E E

E = Elective for Grade Level AS = Advanced Standing 
R = Fulfills Graduation Requirement for Grade Level
EM = Equivalent Mathematics
ES = Equivalent Science
AP = Advanced Placement
TC = Transcripted Credit
MSOE = Milwaukee School of Engineering
PLTW = Project Lead the Way
* There is an anticipated fee for this course. (If a student is not financially able to pay a fee, please contact the student’s counselor or administrator.)

AP CHINESE
Grade: 12
Credit: 1
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Chinese V-Honors
Course Number: 740620

Content: The AP Chinese Language and Culture course is a rigorous course that is taught predominately in Chinese. Students will learn about contemporary Chinese society and culture, by examining Chinese products, practices and perspectives; including ethnic and regional diversity, values, travel and transportation, holidays and food, and current affairs. This course will prepare students to communicate more effectively in real life situations using authentic materials such as newspaper and magazine articles, websites, films, music, and Chinese literature.

AP FRENCH
Grade: 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: French IV
Course Number: 741720

Content: The AP French Language and Culture course emphasizes communication by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentation skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in French.
The AP French Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions). Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

AP SPANISH
Grade: 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Spanish IV
Course Number: 742920

Content: The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a rigorous course that is taught predominately in Spanish and approximately equivalent to a 5th or 6th semester university course. The course requires students to improve their proficiency across the three modes of communication (interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational). The course focuses on the integration of authentic resources including online print, audio, and audiovisual resources, as well as traditional print resources that include literature, essays, and magazine and newspaper articles with the goal of providing a rich, diverse learning experience. Students communicate using advanced vocabulary and linguistic structures as they build proficiency in all modes of communication. Students will have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam.

CHINESE I
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 740120

Content: Chinese I is a course which introduces students to Mandarin Chinese language and culture. Students will begin learning formation and recognition of Chinese characters and be supported through the use of pinyin (Chinese words written with the English alphabet). Students will learn Chinese tones and basic vocabulary, and conversational skills will be developed through the use of interaction and technology. This course is appropriate for students who have not had Chinese before as well as those who started Chinese in elementary but have not continued with it through middle school.

CHINESE II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Chinese I
Course Number: 740220

Content: Chinese II is a course which continues instruction in Mandarin Chinese language and culture. Students will continue developing oral fluency, proficiency in formation and recognition of Chinese characters, and Chinese literacy skills. The use of pinyin (Chinese words written with the English alphabet) will be phased out. Interactive strategies and technology will be a regularly integrated component of learning.

CHINESE III
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Chinese II
Course Number: 740320

Content: Chinese III is a course which continues instruction in Mandarin Chinese language and culture. Students will continue developing oral fluency and literacy skills in Chinese. The use of pinyin (Chinese words written in the English alphabet) will continue to be phased out. Interactive strategies and technology will be a regularly integrated component of learning.

CHINESE IV – HONORS
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Chinese III
Course Number: 740420

Content: Chinese IV is a course which continues instruction in Mandarin Chinese language and culture. Students will continue developing oral fluency and literacy skills in Chinese. Interactive strategies and technology will be a regularly integrated component of learning.
106 | P a g e

CHINESE V – HONORS
Grade: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Chinese IV – Honors
Course Number: 740520

Content: Chinese V – Honors is a course which continues the sequence of Mandarin Chinese language instruction. Students will increase oral fluency and literacy skills to an intermediate level of proficiency which will be developed through interactive strategies and technology. Students will further investigate Chinese culture, traditions, and international relationships.

FRENCH I
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 741120

Content: In French I, students learn about the French language in the context of their own lives. They learn how to describe themselves, their friends and families, and their surroundings. They use beginning grammar and vocabulary to speak in detail about their likes and dislikes, pastimes, and school day. They study the French calendar and important contributions the French have made to our lives. Students use technology to present research on francophone countries and make short movies about their school day. French I sets emphasis on communication and students participate in many authentic performance assessments. Music, games, and multi-media as well as current technology resources are used regularly to enhance instruction.

FRENCH II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: French I
Course Number: 741220

Content: French II expands learning by making comparisons between students’ own lives and the lives of adolescents from francophone countries. There is an emphasis on fashion, pastimes, and family life. Students will be introduced to the past tense, music, games, and multi-media as well as using current technology resources regularly to enhance instruction. Students are also immersed in French culture through hands-on activities.

FRENCH III
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: French II
Course Number: 741320

Content: This intermediate level French course continues students’ language study with a wider scope of vocabulary on familiar topics. This course also broadens student knowledge of French culture including foods, entertainment and daily routines. This class is supplemented with current media and technology resources.

FRENCH IV – HONORS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: French III
Course Number: 741420

Content: This honors course offers students the opportunity to explore the diversity of the francophone world. Students will expand their knowledge of travel and career opportunities in the French speaking world. This course emphasizes speaking and listening to offer a greater understanding of French culture, including literature, art and music, and current events. Students attending a university may be eligible for retroactive credits based upon demonstrated proficiency in the language.

FRENCH V – HONORS
Grade: 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: French IV
Course Number: 741520

Content: This honors course explores France and francophone influence in the world, with a focus on Africa. French V is supplemented by authentic French literature. This course also expands on some earlier themes, including everyday life in the French-speaking world. This class will meet the needs of students who plan to use French for travel, career opportunities and further study. Students attending a university may be eligible for retroactive credits based upon demonstrated proficiency in the language.

SPANISH I
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: None
Course Number: 742120

Content: This is a beginning Spanish language course for students who desire to understand, speak, read and write Spanish. It is also the start of a study about Spanish-speaking countries including their people, cultures, and influences in the U.S. and on each other. It is taught with an emphasis on conversation. A culturally oriented textbook and multimedia will be utilized. Any student interested in people and other cultures would benefit from Spanish I.

SPANISH II
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Spanish I
Course Number: 742220

Content: A continuation of Spanish I, Spanish II builds upon beginning concepts and introduces the past tense. Emphasis is on understanding and speaking, as well as writing. Students will be introduced to authentic Spanish literature. This course allows students to continue to study cultures of Spanish-speaking countries, as well as to improve communication skills in Spanish.

SPANISH III
Grades: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Spanish II
Course Number: 742320

Content: This course is a continuation of Spanish II, so emphasis is placed on listening and speaking. New grammatical concepts will be introduced. Vocabulary and new expressions are stressed in oral and written conversations and in varied activities. Students will explore authentic Spanish literature. Many countries and their traditions are explored.

SPANISH IV – HONORS
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Spanish III
Course Number: 742420

Content: This honors course continues to focus on advanced grammar and concepts. This challenging course emphasizes speaking and listening to offer a greater understanding of the culture and current events of the Spanish speaking world. Students will continue to explore authentic Spanish literature. Students attending a university may be eligible for retroactive credits based upon demonstrated proficiency in the language.

SPANISH V – HONORS
Grade: 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Spanish IV
Course Number: 742520

Content: This honors course emphasizes oral proficiency through situational conversations and special projects. Vocabulary is related to the theme of the unit and is presented in a conversational context. All 14 grammar tenses will be reviewed and expanded upon. Reading skills are strengthened through the exploration of works of Spanish and Latin American literature. Art, history and culture, as well as contemporary topics are explored. This class will meet the needs of students who want to hone their Spanish for personal use, travel, career opportunities and further study. Students attending a university may be eligible for retroactive credits based upon demonstrated proficiency in the language. Students will speak Spanish and take notes in Spanish.

SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I – HONORS
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Spanish is spoken in the student’s home. Student speaks Spanish fluently, in addition to reading and writing basic Spanish.
Course Number: 742620

Content: This is a Spanish Honors course for native Spanish speakers with an emphasis on grammar, reading and culture in which the reading is integrated with language skills to include writing workshops, grammar, oral communication activities, critical reading, listening skills and research skills. Students will learn to use more formal varieties of Spanish and learn to interact with people in a fashion more appropriate for the business environment.

SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS II – HONORS
Grade: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1.0
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Spanish for Heritage Speakers I
Course Number: 742720

Content: This Honors course is a continuation of Spanish for Heritage Speakers I – Honors with an emphasis on grammar, reading and culture in which the reading is integrated with language skills to include writing workshops, grammar and oral communication activities, critical reading, listening skills and research skills. Students will learn to use more formal varieties of Spanish and learn to interact with people in a fashion more appropriate for the business environment.


Work-Based Learning

Youth Apprenticeship


YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP
Grades: 11 and 12
Credit: 2.0
(1.0 credit per year)
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in related classroom and consent of program advisor. Application Required
Course Number: 629800

Content: Youth Apprenticeship is an intensive two-year educational program for high school juniors and seniors combining school-based learning with work-based learning in a business or industry. Students in youth apprentice programs receive school-based credit and work-based credit toward graduation upon completion of each course. A Certificate of Proficiency in the specific program area will be earned if the identified business/industry competencies’ are completed to the proficiency level identified by the Governor’s Work-based Learning Board (GWBLB). Youth Apprenticeship programs available in Janesville are:

  • • Agriculture
  • • Architectural Drafting and Design
  • • Automotive
  • • Auto body
  • • Manufacturing Machining
  • • Marketing
  • • Mechanical Drafting and Design
  • • Principles of Engineering

Mentorship


MENTORSHIP
Grades: 10,11
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester or can be taken for additional semester
Prerequisites: Prospective students must fill out a statement of interest and obtain teacher recommendations. See instructor for forms. Instructor Consent.
Course Number: Semester A: 753121
And/or Semester B: 753122

Content: Students in this course earn credit by attending a class that is at a local place of business. Students will learn employability skills, habits, and attitudes conducive to employment success. Mentorship offers the students an opportunity to “try” a career. It assists students to choose a career wisely, prepare for employment suited to their abilities and interests, and learn to work with others in successful and rewarding ways. This course is designed to provide students with real-life work experience within the Janesville community.
Professional Internship

JUNIOR/SENIOR INTERNSHIP
Grades: 11, 12
Credit: 0.5
Length: Semester or can be taken for additional semester
Prerequisites: Prospective students must fill out a statement of interest and obtain teacher recommendations. See instructor for forms. Instructor Consent.
Course Number: Semester A: 753111
And/or Semester B: 753112

Content: This course is designed to provide a challenging opportunity for motivated, responsible students who are ready to direct their own learning. After an initial period of classroom instruction dealing with leadership, ethics, critical and creative thinking, students will gain experience through career exploration in a business, non-profit, government or academic setting. Students will be released during the class period as part of the 50-hour field experience with their professional mentor. Additional contact hours can be arranged as agreed upon by student, teacher and mentor. A detailed log, portfolio and final project are presented at the completion of the course.

Elevate


ELEVATE
Grades: 11,12
Credit: 3
Length: Year
Prerequisites: Prospective students must fill out a statement of interest and obtain teacher recommendations. See instructor for forms. Instructor Consent.
Course Number: NA

Content: Elevate is an innovative education capstone, designed by Craig High School, to give students hands-on, real-world experiences immersed in a professional setting. Students engage in a rigorous curriculum while also learning valuable skills for high-demand careers. Industry partners provide real project work and opportunities for students to build portfolios and resumes. Students are mentored by professionals with each course integrating guest instructors who discuss course-related content. Students enter Elevate with a strong academic background and leave with skills and experience to lead the next generation workforce. The Global Business strand will be comprised of the following classes. International Business (1 semester,) Entrepreneurship (1 semester),
AS Oral Communication (1 semester), AS Written Communication (1 semester),
Finance and Investing (1 semester), AS Economics (1 semester)
For application information, please see Mr. Miles or Mr. Elsen at Craig High School.

Middle School Course Handbooks

Parent / Student Handbook

 

School District of Janesville

Parent / Student Handbook

2018-2019 School Year

Compiled by the Administrative Services Department

Updated 1/31/19

Parent Student Handbook PDF

Table of Contents

Part 1: Policies and Procedures                                           

Homework Guidelines
Immunization Policy
Keeping Elementary Students "After School"
McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Students Act
Medication Policy
Parent-Teacher Conferences
Physical Education Exclusions
Prohibited Items
Removing a Student from the Classroom
Request to Withhold / Release Directory Data: Military / Higher Education
School Delay / Closing Information
Sexual Harassment Policy
Special Education
Student Appearance
Student Expectations
Student Lockers, Desks, and Other District Property
Student Non-Discrimination (Disability, Religious Belief, Gender Identity Accommodation)
Student Privacy: Survey and Opinion Polls
Student Records
Transportation of Students by School District 
Use of Animals in the classroom
Vision and Hearing Tests
Visitors to the School
Acceptable Use of Technology
Attendance
Bicycles
Boundary Lines
Breakfast/Lunch Program
Bullying Prevention
Cellular Phones and Other Electronic Devices
Co-Curricular Code (Athletics and Club Participation)
Communication
Corporal Punishment - Use of Force
Discipline
Discrimination Complaint Procedures
Drug, Alcohol and Tobacco Use/ Abuse Enforcement and Referral Process
Elector Registration
(High School Only)
Elementary Playground Procedures/ Supervision
Elementary Safety Patrol
Emergency Situations
Exposure Control Plan
Expulsion
Fees
Flyer Distribution and Posters / Wall Displays                 
Gun Concealment
Health, Illness, Accidents

 

 

Part 2: Student Conduct Code

Introduction
Disciplinary Definitions and Procedures
Battery
Drugs, Alcohol, Tobacco, and Look-Alike Drugs
Electronic Devices
False Alarms / Bomb Threats
Forgery / Cheating / Academic Dishonesty
Harassment / Discriminatory Acts
Inappropriate Clothing / Attire
Inappropriate Language
Inappropriate Use of Telecommunications
Physical Attack on Staff Member
Repeated Classroom Disruption / Chronic Disruption or Violation of School Rules
Repeated Tardiness
Safety Violations / Fighting
Sexual Assault
Theft
Threats or Intimidating Acts
Truancy
Vandalism / Graffiti
Weapons
Policy of the Janesville School District on Youth Gangs

 

Thank you for taking the time to review the School District of Janesville’s Parent/Student Handbook. Please keep this handbook on hand to refer to during your child’s school career. Throughout the handbook there are references to School District of Janesville Board Policies and/or Administrative Regulations. These policies and regulations are available on the district website at www.janesville.k12.wi.us.

 

Acceptable Use of Technology

Please refer to Board Policy 6724 and Administrative Regulations 6724.1, 6724.2, and 6724.3 for the complete guidelines for acceptable use of technology.

The School District of Janesville recognizes that instructional technology is a key component in contemporary education. Because of the many types of applications, the Board of Education established a board policy to plan for and guide educational technology use and growth for instructional uses. The purpose of the School District of Janesville’s educational technology program is to support and enhance student learning and achievement. Students are responsible for ethical and moral behavior in the use of computers and the Internet, just as they are in a classroom or on school property. The School District of Janesville educates students about appropriate online behavior, including social networking, cyber bullying awareness, and digital citizenship. Users may be held personally responsible for the cost of repairing damage to technology resources when such damage is the result of a user’s deliberate or negligent misuse. Inappropriate behavior may result in disciplinary actions including student expulsion.

If a technology device is damaged, School District of Janesville administration reserves the right to charge a student or parent/guardian the full cost for repair or replacement when the damage occurs due to negligence or misuse. Examples of negligence or misuse include, but are not limited to:

  1. Leaving technology devices or equipment unattended, or unlocked
  2. Lending technology devices or equipment to others
  3. Using technology devices or equipment in an unsafe environment
  4. Using technology devices or equipment in an unsafe manner

he final determination of costs of repairs or replacement will be determined by the Chief Information Officer.

Attendance

Wisconsin has a Compulsory School Attendance Law. Accordingly, the School District of Janesville has adopted a Board Policy (BP 5141) and Administrative Regulation (AR 5141.1) consistent with the provisions of this State Law. The State Statute establishes the following definitions:

  • Truancy: Any absence of part or all of one or more school days during which the school attendance officer, principal, or teacher has not been notified of the legal cause of such absence by the parent or guardian of the absent student. It also means intermittent attendance carried on for the purpose of defeating the intent of the compulsory attendance law.
  • Habitual Truant: A pupil who is absent from school without an acceptable excuse part, or all of five (5) or more days, on which school is held during a school semester.

In accordance with state law, all children between six (6) and eighteen (18) years of age, and all children enrolled in 5-year-old kindergarten, must attend school during the period and hours that school is in session until the end of the term, quarter, or semester in which they become eighteen (18) years of age, unless they have a legal excuse, fall under one of the exceptions in the State Statutes, or have graduated from high school.
Students may not be absent without excuse for more than any part or all of five (5) or more days on which school is held during a school semester. Students are limited to ten (10) days (80 hours) of excused absences per year, except as otherwise provided in this policy. Students beyond the 10 days/80 hours may be required to make up academic time through detentions or in-school suspension.

For a planned absence to be an excused absence, the student must be excused in writing by his or her parent or guardian before the absence. The student is required to complete any course work missed during the absence.
Although students of legal age may not be subject to laws governing compulsory school attendance, they are nonetheless subject to the rules set forth in this policy governing excused absences, and may be subject to discipline for failing to comply with those rules. Approval of excused absences for students of legal age is governed by Board Policy 5240.

Excused absences not counted against the ten (10) day limit per year are those resulting from the following.

  • Religious holiday
  • A written medical excuse by a medical practitioner as permitted by state law. (Medical practitioner refers to any one of the following: licensed physician, dentist, chiropractor, optometrist, psychologist, physician assistant, nurse practitioner (as defined by state statute), certified advanced practice nurse prescriber or Christ Science practitioner who lives and resides in this state.)
  •  A death in the immediate family or a funeral for a close relative. Elementary and middle school students excused for funeral attendance must be accompanied by their parent or guardian. High school students may be excused for funeral attendance with written authorization from a parent or guardian.
  •  A court appearance or other legal procedure which requires the attendance of the student. The absence will only be excused for the time required for travel and appearance.
  •  A school-ordered suspension.
  •  A waiver authorized by the building principal or his/her agent in special cases where he/she determines that exceptional circumstance exist, including, but not limited to, a waiver for the purpose of serving as an election official as permitted under state law.

A student who has reached sixteen (16) years of age may be excused by the Board from regular school attendance if he/she has requested permission to be excused; the school has received written approval of the student’s parent or guardian; the student and his/her parent or guardian agree, in writing, that the student will participate in a program or curriculum modification as defined by state law leading to the student’s high school graduation; and the Board of Education has approved the student’s request to be excused and the program or curriculum modification.

Upon the student’s request and with the written approval of the student’s parent or guardian, any student who is seventeen (17) years of age or over may be excused by the Board from regular school attendance if the student and his/her parent or guardian agree, in writing, that the student will participate in a program or curriculum modification as defined by state law leading to the student’s high school graduation or leading to a high school equivalency diploma. The Board of Education may approve the student’s request to be excused and the program or curriculum modification.

The School District of Janesville shall not deny a student credit in a course or subject solely because of a student’s unexcused absences or suspension from school. However, the School Board shall establish necessary guidelines to enhance the full attendance requirements and to determine appropriate action to serve as a deterrent to truancy.

The following provisions of the Attendance Policy are important for parents and guardians to note:

  1. Parents or guardians should notify a school's attendance officer of an absence by telephone, email, or written note, prior to 8:30 a.m. on the day of absence, or in advance of the day of absence if the absence is planned. The principal reserves the right to request both a phone call and an e-mail or written note as circumstances warrant.
  2. The school will attempt to contact parent/guardian by numbers provided for home, work, or other contact number before the end of the second school day after the unexcused absence is noted.
  3. Elementary students must be present for a minimum of one hour in any one-half day to be considered in attendance for that one-half day. Such absences will be determined to be either excused or unexcused based upon the nature of the absence as provided above.
  4. Middle and high school students who are tardy in excess of fifteen (15) minutes will be recorded as absent for that class.
  5. All students with excused absences shall make up work missed. It is the student’s responsibility to immediately contact the teacher(s) to make arrangements for making up work missed during an excused absence from school. A planned excused absence form is required for planned absences. Homework, formative assessments, and cumulative assessments missed shall be made up in accordance with school district approved grading procedures. Examinations missed during an excused absence shall be permitted to be taken at a time mutually agreed upon by the student and the teacher. Unexcused/truant students are permitted to make up all exams, formative assessments, and cumulative assessments in accordance with school district approved grading procedures.
  6. The school's attendance officer or principal will notify parents or guardians after a student has been absent the five allowable days during a school semester under the provisions of this policy. A letter will be sent to the parents or guardians of habitual truants when their absences warrant that designation under the provisions of the attendance policy.

Questions concerning this policy may be directed to your building principal.

Parents or guardians may review their student’s attendance record through the Infinite Campus system. If a parent or guardian believes their student has an error in their attendance record the parent or guardian should put in writing the date(s) they feel are in error and why they are in error. They should also include copies of any documentation from a doctor’s office, etc. which could lead to correction of the error. This information should be brought to the attendance clerk at the student’s school.

Students who are in the School District of Janesville under the State of Wisconsin Open enrollment program can have their open enrollment terminated at the end of the attendance semester or school year if they are habitually truant under this policy.

Bicycles

Young children lack the physical coordination and good judgment to handle their bicycles safely in busy traffic situations which often exist around a school; therefore, we strongly discourage children below third grade from riding their bikes to school. Children who bring bicycles to school do so at their own risk. Bicycles are to be parked in the bicycle racks. All bicycles must be locked with one bicycle per lock. Schools do not provide special supervision for the bike rack. Bicycles may not be ridden on the school lawn, in student drop off/pick up areas or in the school parking lot. The School District of Janesville will not be responsible for bikes that are damaged or stolen. (Board Policy 5463)

Boundary Lines and Transfer Procedures

Please refer to Administrative Regulation 5130.1. Information about annual transfer procedure requirements is also published on the district website. Any questions may be directed to the Open Enrollment Specialist at 608-743-5152.

Breakfast/Lunch Program

The School District of Janesville school lunch program offers lunch every school day. Sack lunches may be ordered in advance for field trips as well. All elementary schools provide a free breakfast.

Breakfast/Lunch Menus

The breakfast menu is posted on the district's website.

Our lunches offer a choice of two entrees combined with a self-service food bar for a variety of fruits and vegetables from which to choose. Several milk choices are available daily and are included with the lunch purchase. Lunch consists of a minimum of five food components; students have the option of declining one or two components of their choice. A serving of fruit or vegetable is required.

Like the meals you eat at home or elsewhere, some of our lunches are higher in fat and some are lower. If you eat a school lunch every day of the week and eat all of the foods offered, you can be assured of the following:

  • Our school lunches meet the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
  • Our lunches provide age specific calorie counts, 0 trans fats, reduced sodium, < 10% saturated fat, whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Our school meals offer variety and balance.
  • School meals help our customers meet the National Cancer Institute’s “5-A-Day” recommendation for fruits and vegetables.

School lunch menus are published weekly in the local newspapers and posted on the school district’s web page. Menus are posted in the school and will be sent home with the school newsletter. Menus are available in Spanish.

Meal Prices

Meal prices are published at the beginning of the school year. Money may be put into your child's meal account in any amount at any time. An online payment option is available through Infinite Campus, or you may send payment to your student's school in an envelope on which you have written the child's name and the dollar amount enclosed. Checks should be made payable to School District of Janesville Food Service and should not be combined with payments for other goods or activities.

Meal accounts may be used to pay for breakfast, lunch, and lunchtime milk for those who bring a cold lunch. Milk for elementary students’ milk break is a separate fund managed by your school office.

Whenever your child's lunch account is getting low, an automated courtesy telephone call is sent home to convey that it is time to make another payment. These calls are made on Mondays and Thursdays. You may, through Infinite Campus, view your child's meal account balance, or call your school's food service staff to inquire about your child's lunch account balance or record of transactions.

The meal account system is a debit system, not a credit system. Meals may not be charged. We do understand, however, that occasionally a student comes to school unprepared for meals. It is important for the student to have something to eat, so we will lend them up to two full meals which must be repaid. An automated telephone call will be made to notify you of your student's negative balance. These calls are placed daily until payment is made.
Adults may join their children for lunch anytime by paying for their meal on the lunch line. Please notify your school office when you plan to visit.

SDJ School Nutrition Meal Charge Policy
Because all students in participating schools may receive reimbursable school meals, all School Food Authorities must have a policy in place for children who are participating at the paid rate, but either do not have money in their account or in hand to cover the cost of the meal at the time of service. Such a policy ensures that school food service professionals, school administrators, families, and students have a shared understanding of expectations in these situations.

If a student account balance is negative a daily reminder call to the parent / guardian will be placed asking for payment. Low balance reminder calls will begin when a student account is under $8.00 for a full pay student. These low balance reminder calls are sent on Mondays and Thursdays.

Elementary students will not be refused a meal. When an account is negative, an additional call will be made from the School Nutrition office or the Principal’s office until we contact a parent/guardian and determine how and when payment will be made. If payment cannot be made, School Nutrition will notify the parent to send a lunch to school with their child as their account will be suspended until payment arrangements can be made. The parent/guardian will be asked if they would like to apply for free or reduced price meals.

Middle School and High School students must have either funds available in their account or cash to purchase foods they select for lunch. If the student does not have funds available, they must seek out the Kitchen Manager for approval to purchase a meal on credit. All credit purchases must be paid by the following school day. If a student does not have funds or the ability to make a payment they can select an alternate meal (peanut butter and jelly sandwich, fruit, and milk) at no charge. The student may request a cheese sandwich if allergic to peanuts. Alternate meals are available on two successive days for students.

Middle School and High School students will be asked to contact their parent / guardian by the Kitchen Manager when they ask for approval to receive a meal on credit. Parents will be contacted by texted message or phone call from their child’s phone, or a written reminder that their child’s lunch account requires payment will be sent home with student. If a parent cannot pay they must make payment arrangements with the Kitchen Manager or School Nutrition office at the Educational Services Center or the child’s account will be suspended. The parent / guardian will be asked if they would like to apply for free meals.

Charging by adults and all district personnel is not allowed at any time.

Diet Restrictions

The printed menu is marked to indicate which foods contain pork (*), which foods contain peanuts or nuts (#), and which foods contain turkey (T) when turkey is not part of the name. Food substitutions may be requested for students with disabilities whose impairment requires a diet restriction. You will find a "Special Dietary Needs Form" on the district's website, or contact the school district food service office at 743-5132 to obtain a copy of the form. If your child requires food substitutions, this form must be submitted with a list of recommended substitutions or alterations and be signed by a medical authority. We are generally able to begin services as soon as the completed form is returned. Until that time, please provide for the dietary needs of your child.

Free and Reduced Price Meals

If you think that your child may qualify for free or reduced price meals, be sure to fill out an application and submit it to the Business Office at the Educational Services Center, 527 S. Franklin St., Janesville. One form needs to be filled out each year per household. Forms are distributed to all students at the beginning of the school year. Forms are also available from your school office and at the Business Office throughout the school year. Please allow up to ten working days to process the application. Most applications, however, are processed in just a few days.

Any student who qualified for free or reduced price lunches at the end of the previous school year will continue to be qualified for a 30-day grace period at the beginning of the new school year. Use this time to re-establish your eligibility for free or reduced meals. New applications must be submitted each school year so that your child does not have a break in benefits. Benefits are not retroactive. You, the parent or guardian, are responsible for purchasing meals or providing a sack lunch until approval for benefits is determined by the school district.

Parent Visitors

Parents who wish to eat lunch with their students must follow the guidelines listed under the Visitors to the Schools section of this handbook.

Bullying Prevention

The School District of Janesville Board of Education strives to provide an educational environment where every student feels safe, respected and welcomed. (Board Policy 5141) The Board also strives to provide an educational environment where every staff member can serve students in an atmosphere that is free from significant disruptions and obstacles that impede learning and performance. Bullying can have harmful social, physical, psychological and/or academic effects for those who engage in these behaviors, victims of such behaviors, and bystanders who observe acts of bullying. The District prohibits any form of bullying behavior by students towards other students, school employees, volunteers, or any other person(s).

Bullying includes aggressive or hostile behavior that is intentional and involves an imbalance of power between the bully and the bullied. Bullying is a form of victimization and is not necessarily a result of or part of an on-going conflict. Bullying is defined as any conscious, willful, or deliberate acts, or attempted acts, through the use of words, images, gestures or other physical actions, including electronically transmitted acts, that are intended to cause physical injury, emotional distress or property damage. Bullying includes, but is not limited to, behaviors motivated by an actual or perceived distinguishing characteristic or factor including sex, race, national origin, ancestry, religion, color, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability or handicap. Bullying may also be motivated by any other distinguishing factor such as gender identity, physical appearance, or social, economic or family status.
Examples of acts of bullying include physical intimidation, force or assault, humiliation, sexual or racist remarks, extortion, verbal or written threats, taunting, put downs, name calling, threatening or menacing looks or gestures, spreading cruel rumors, and social exclusion. This includes acts of cyber-bullying that involve sending or posting inappropriate, insulting or threatening messages or images through electronic communication systems such as the Internet, e-mail, cell phones or other personal devices.

Bullying is prohibited on District grounds, at District-related activities, or on transportation to and from school or District-sponsored activities. Harassing bullying behavior is prohibited in all educational environments, regardless of whether the facility or location is owned, leased, or otherwise used or provided by the District.
Acts of bullying that originate off school premises and outside of the school’s control may be subject to the provisions of this policy and related procedures if the conduct is determined to be substantially disruptive to the educational process and the day-to-day operations of a school. This includes, but is not limited to, threats made outside of school hours that communicate intent to be carried out during any school-related or school-sponsored program or activity, or on any vehicles used for transportation to and from school and school-sponsored activities.
All complaints about bullying shall be promptly investigated. The District shall respect the privacy of the complainant, the individual(s) against whom the complaint is filed, and the witnesses as much as practicable and in a manner consistent with the Board’s legal obligations to investigate, take appropriate action, and conform to discovery or disclosure requirements. Disclosure of information related to the complaint shall be made only to those with a legitimate need to know. All records generated as a result of the complaint and appeal processes shall be maintained as confidential to the extent permitted by law.

If the investigations find bullying has occurred, school officials shall take prompt and necessary action up to and including behavioral interventions and support, disciplinary action, and/or referral to law enforcement officials or social services. Consequences shall be unique to the nature of the behavior, the developmental level of the student, and the history of problem behaviors. Remedial measures shall be designed to correct the problem behavior, prevent other occurrences, and protect the victim.

The District shall also take appropriate action against any student or District employee who retaliates against any person who makes a good-faith report of alleged bullying or against any person who testifies, assists, or participates in an investigation or hearing related to such behavior.

Employees found to have facilitated or participated in bullying behavior against students or to have been aware that bullying was taking place and failed to report the behavior are considered to be in violation of the prohibition expressed by this policy and may be subject to disciplinary action.

This policy shall be distributed annually to all students enrolled in the School District, parents/guardians, and all District employees. It shall also be distributed to organizations in the community having cooperative agreements with the schools. The District shall provide a copy of the policy to any person upon request.

Records shall be maintained on the number and types of reports made, and sanctions imposed for violations of this policy in accordance with established procedures.

Cellular Phones and Other Electronic Devices

Authorized electronic devices may be used with Administrator approval; however, they are prohibited in locker rooms and restrooms unless powered off in accordance with State Statute 175.22. Unauthorized devices are prohibited on school premises or at any school-sponsored activity. Personally owned electronic devices may be searched as permitted by law. Please refer to Board Policy 6724 and the related Administrative Regulations for the complete policy on Instructional Technology and the Acceptable Use Policy for Technology.

Possession of cellular phones is permitted on school premises. Cellular phones must be powered off/turned off and not used for any purpose, unless permission is granted by the teacher.

Student use or possession of electronic paging (e.g. beepers) or two-way communication devices other than cellular phones on school premises is prohibited. Building administration, however, is authorized to permit a student to use an electronic paging device, two-way communication device, including a cellular phone, to be used for medical, school, educational, vocational, or other purposes as deemed appropriate. Personal music devices, cameras, recording devices, as well as hand held games are also prohibited. Students may not use personal devices to take photographs (pictures) or videos without the consent of a supervising staff member.

Any student found violating this policy shall surrender the communication device and be subject to disciplinary action. If a student device is confiscated more than once, a parent/guardian will need to pick up the device.
Co-Curricular Code (Athletics and Club Participation)

Please see the Co-Curricular Code (Athletics and Club Participation) document provided to parents at middle and high school Code meetings for the complete text of the Code.

The Code will be administered in conjunction with current Board Policy 5141 and Administrative Regulations 5141.1 regarding regular school attendance and Board Policy 5234 and Administrative Regulations 5234.1 and 5234.2 regarding drug and alcohol use/abuse policies.

The School District of Janesville has established both academic standards and standards of behavior that apply to all students. As part of the educational process, each program will focus on standards relating to, but not limited to, appropriate conduct, citizenship, and healthy lifestyle. Standards can only be effective if they represent what parents, employers, educators, community members and students believe are important and are possible to achieve. These standards will only be learned when they are continually reinforced through instruction received in all school programs, including extra-curricular activities, and in the home.

High personal standards of conduct, citizenship and healthy lifestyles are examples of responsible behavior that best serve succeeding generations. Therefore, by signing this four-year binding, 12-month code, students accept the responsibility to match the privilege of participation with an equal measure of responsible personal behavior.
Participation in any organized, extra-curricular program is an earned privilege that carries expectations and responsibilities that exceed the norm of regular school attendance. Students who elect to participate are expected to model behaviors that will reflect positively on their school and the community of Janesville. All non WIAA extra-curricular activities, which includes school clubs, will be divided into seasons coinciding with fall, winter and spring athletic seasons as defined by the WIAA.

Each coach, facility adviser, new student and at least one parent or guardian must confirm they have read and agreed to the Code prior to their first activity. The purpose of the reading and review of the Code is to promote better understanding of the Code and the extra-curricular programs of the district. Each participant will be required to re-sign their Code card from previous years. With their agreement, participants and parents agree to adhere to this Code.

The responsibility for administering the Code rests with the building administrator or designee.

Statement of Risk

All extra-curricular activities involve some risk. Consequently, participants in any extra-curricular activity may be at risk for serious injuries. The School District of Janesville and the Board of Education endeavor to operate extra-curricular activities in a safe manner; however, it is impossible to eliminate the risk of injury while participating in an extra-curricular activity. Parents, guardians and student athletes should consider these risks carefully before deciding to participate in any extra-curricular activity.

Communication

Parent-teacher communication in the School District of Janesville plays an integral part in the educational development of every child. Parent-teacher communication is used to strengthen school/home, teacher-child-parent relationships and to build cooperative support for the education and growth of the child.

Progress reports may be sent to parents at any time during the year. Parents may also request progress reports, or utilize Infinite Campus to obtain updates on student progress.

Corporal Punishment - Use of Force

Per Board Policy 5310, Wisconsin law prohibits corporal punishment, "intentional infliction of physical pain which is used as a means of discipline," in schools. School personnel may use reasonable and/or necessary force to:

  1. Quell a disturbance;
  2. Prevent an act that threatens physical injury to any person;
  3. Obtain possession of a weapon or other dangerous object within a student's control;
  4. Defend one’s self or others;
  5. Protect property;
  6. Remove a disruptive student from school premises, a school motor vehicle, or a school-sponsored activity;
  7. Prevent a student from harming himself or herself;
  8. Protect the safety of others; and
  9. Maintain order and control.

Any staff member using physical force, or witnessing the use of physical force, should report such use in accordance with established procedures.

Discipline

Students are expected to abide by any and all established codes of conduct, board policies, and conduct/behavior as outlined by the student handbook and as stated in rules established by building principals for each school.
All students are considered important to establishing and maintaining a safe and educationally conducive environment. When it becomes necessary to investigate student misconduct, students have a duty to cooperate and answer questions truthfully and completely. Students who lie, are uncooperative, and/or evasive will be subject to disciplinary action up to and/or including a recommendation for expulsion. (Board Policy 5300)
Discrimination Complaint Procedures

Discrimination Complaint Procedures

Any complaint by a student or his/her parent or guardian regarding the interpretation or application of the provisions of state and federal nondiscrimination legal requirements and the District’s student nondiscrimination policy shall be processed in accordance with the following complaint procedures (Administrative Regulation 5020.2). Complaints pertaining to students with a disability shall be referred to the Special Education Department. Other discrimination complaints, including harassment complaints based on protected discrimination factors, shall be directed to the Student Services Department.

These complaint procedures do not diminish or otherwise replace the rights of students or parents/guardians to pursue claims or issues through other legally-mandated procedures such as Section 504 or Individuals with Disabilities Education Act due process complaints and hearings.

Informal Procedure

The student or parent/guardian who believes there is a valid basis for a complaint shall attempt to resolve the complaint by discussing the concern with the building principal.

The Student Services Department, and/or designee, will attempt to resolve the complaint if the principal is the person alleged to have discriminated against the student. A prompt and impartial investigation will occur with a response to the complainant within seven (7) days. If this reply is not acceptable to the complainant, he/she may initiate formal procedures according to the steps listed.

Step One

A written statement of the complaint shall be prepared with a signature by the complainant and submitted to the principal and/or Student Services Department/designee within ten (10) days after the known occurrence of the act or event. The written complaint shall be submitted to:

Title IX/Discrimination Complaint Officer
Educational Services Center
527 S. Franklin Street
Janesville, WI 53548-4779

Complaints may also be deferred to the Office of Civil Rights: 

United States Department of Education
Office for Civil Rights
500 West Madison Street
Suite 1475
Chicago, IL 60661
312-730-1560

www.ed.gov/ocr

The principal, and/or Student Services Department/designee, upon receiving such a written complaint, shall further investigate the complaint. The principal, and/or Student Services Department/designee, shall, within fifteen (15) days after the completion of the investigation, decide the merits of the case, determine the action to be taken, if any, and report in writing the findings and resolution of the case to the complainant and the accused.

Step Two

If the complainant is dissatisfied with the decision of the principal, and/or Student Services Department/designee, he/she may appeal the decision by giving written notice to the District Administrator within five (5) days after the receipt of the written decision. The District Administrator/designee shall schedule and hold a meeting with the aggrieved party within fifteen (15) days. The District Administrator shall, within five (5) days after the meeting, deliver a written response to the aggrieved party and to the accused.

Step Three

If the complainant is dissatisfied with the decision of the District Administrator/designee, the complainant may appeal the decision by giving written notice thereof to the Board Clerk within five (5) days after receipt of the District Administrator/designee’s decision. The Board shall hear the appeal within fifteen (15) days. It shall make its decision in writing within five (5) days after the completion of the hearing.Within five (5) days, copies of the written decision shall be mailed or delivered to the complainant, the District Administrator/designee, and the accused.

Failure of the complainant to act within the time specified shall mean acceptance of the decision rendered at the last step, or may indicate that the complaint is being pursued through other avenues afforded by law. Failure of the principal, Director of Student Services/designee, District Administrator/ designee to act within the times specified shall cause the complainant to proceed to the next step of this procedure.

A written determination of the complaint must be made within 90 days of receipt of the written complaint unless the parties agree to an extension of time. An explanation of the complainant’s right to appeal the District’s decision to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction within 30 days of the decision must be stated in the letter.

Step Four

If the complainant is still dissatisfied, further appeal may be made within thirty (30) calendar days to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

A complaint or appeal based on Title IX, Title VI, Section 504, or the Americans with Disabilities Act may be made to the U.S. Office for Civil Rights – Region V in Chicago.

Complaint Procedure -- Federal Programs

Discrimination complaints relating to programs specifically governed by federal law or regulation (e.g. Education Department General Administrative Regulations - EDGAR complaints) shall be referred directly to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Complaint Procedure – Special Education

Discrimination complaints relating to the identification, evaluation, educational placement, or the provision of free appropriate public education of a student with a disability shall be processed in accordance with established appeal procedures outlined in the District's special education handbook.
Complaint Procedures -- Section 504 Complaints

Discrimination complaints relating to discrimination prohibited by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 shall be processed in accordance with the established complaint procedures unless the student or parent/guardian requests an Impartial Due Process Hearing in place of the grievance procedures. Impartial hearings shall be conducted in accordance with established procedures that entitle the student or parent/guardian and his/her counsel, if any, to full participation including the right to present evidence.

Maintenance of Complaint Records

The maintenance of complaint records is recommended for the purpose of documenting compliance. Records shall be kept for each complaint filed and, at a minimum, include the following:

  1. Name and address of the complainant and his/her title or status,
  2. Date the complaint was filed,
  3. Specific allegation made and any corrective action requested by the complainant,
  4. Name and address of the respondents,
  5. Levels of processing followed, and the resolution, date and decision-making authority at each level,
  6. Summary of facts and evidence presented by each party involved, and
  7. Determination of the facts, statement of the final resolution, and the nature and date(s) of any corrective or remedial action taken.

Drug, Alcohol and Tobacco Use/Abuse Enforcement and Referral Process
Please refer to Board Policy 5234 for the School District of Janesville’s policies regarding Drug and Alcohol Use/Abuse and Enforcement and Administrative Regulation 5234.1 for the Referral Process for students thought to have a problem in this area.

The Board recognizes that drug and alcohol use/abuse are existing problems within the schools of the nation. The Board recognizes that alcohol and drug use/abuse is a behavioral/medical problem.
One goal of the school staff is to provide help, guidance, and referral for assessment/treatment when a student shows indication of a possible behavioral/medical problem. An equally important goal is to provide for every student a healthy and appropriate atmosphere in which to seek an education. The School District of Janesville becomes concerned when an individual student's drug- or alcohol-impaired behavior endangers the property, health, or safety of others during the school day, on the school grounds, or during a school-related activity.
Per Board Policy 3645 smoking and the use of any tobacco products shall be prohibited on all school district properties and in school district vehicles. Notices to that affect will be posted.
Elector Registration (High School Only)

Students and staff may register to vote at the high school on any day that classes are regularly held by completing the required elector registration form and during the annual voter registration drive.
Except as otherwise specifically provided by law, a person is considered eligible to vote if he/she: 1) is a U.S. citizen, 2) is 18 years of age or older, and 3) has resided in an election district or ward for 10 days before any election where the citizens are eligible to vote.

The School District of Janesville will partner with local organizations to provide elector voter registration services. An annual elector registration drive will be provided at each high school building in the district. The principal or designee at each building will set the date and time of the annual voter registration drive. The principal or designee reserves a location for the registration drive and publicizes the date and time to all students and staff who are eligible to register. Students and staff are eligible to register outside this time period. They should contact the building principal to make individual arrangements. Board Policy 1313 and Administrative Regulation 1313.1 have the complete information regarding this process.

Elementary Playground Procedures/Supervision

School personnel are assigned to supervise the elementary playground area before school begins in the morning. This supervision begins at 8:05 a.m. Regular noon and recess supervision is provided in each elementary school. The loading and unloading of school buses is also supervised. There is minimal school ground supervision at the close of the school day. During inclement weather children will be allowed in the building at 8:05 a.m.
We ask your cooperation in making certain your children do not arrive at school too early. There is no need for them to be on the school grounds until just prior to the first bell in the morning which rings at 8:15 a.m. Children should leave the school grounds within ten (10) minutes of the end of the school day.

Elementary Safety Patrol

The main duty of the elementary safety patrol is to ensure safe behavior. Disruptive behavior is reported. The elementary safety patrol program is made up of fourth and fifth grade students, and is supervised by a school staff member. Students must be in good academic standing to participate.
Emergency Situations

During emergency situations, such as a fire drill, tornado drill, lock down or other emergency situation students are expected to follow all staff directions, to walk quickly to their designated drill area or lock down site, to refrain from talking, and to remain in the designated area until the all-clear signal is given by the administration. Students will not be released from school if an emergency situation occurs at dismissal time. Campus Messenger will serve as our primary means of notification to let parents know when students will be released. Please see individual school information for specific designated relocation information.

Board Policies 5400 – Student Health, Welfare and/or Safety and 5460 – School Safety contain detailed information about the District’s safety plan and procedures.

Exposure Control Plan

The School District of Janesville, per Board Policy 5423, has a plan in place to address how the school district will handle a student who is exposed to another person’s blood or other body fluids contaminated with blood. A central focus of this plan is prevention activities to minimize the chance of a student being exposed.
However, should there be an exposure to blood that involves a student, the school will notify the student’s parents/guardians of the incident. This notification will first be attempted by telephone. If the school staff cannot reach a parent/guardian by telephone, a letter will be sent.

To protect confidentiality, the school will not release the name of the employee/student whose blood your child was exposed to. Parents/guardians will be encouraged to seek medical care.

An exposed student’s doctor may request a blood test from the employee/student whose blood your child was exposed to. The school will assist the family by contacting the employee or parent/guardian of the student to explain the process and encourage the blood testing to be done. State laws indicate this testing is voluntary and cannot be required. Any testing results that are completed will be shared with your child’s doctor. If you have questions or concerns regarding the district’s exposure control plan, please call the District offices at 608-743-5000.

Expulsion

Board of Education policy 5350 and Wisconsin State Law provides students may be expelled from school if they:

  • Find him/her guilty of repeated refusal or neglect to obey the rules; or
  • Find that a student knowingly conveyed or caused to be conveyed any threat or false information concerning an attempt or alleged attempt being made or to be made to destroy any school property by means of explosives; or
  • Find that a student engaged in conduct while at school or while under the supervision of a school authority which endangered the property, health or safety of others; or
  • Find that a student while not at school or while not under the supervision of a school authority engaged in conduct which endangered the property, health, or safety of others at school or under the supervision of a school authority; or
  • Find that a student endangered the property, health, or safety of any employee or school board member of the school district in which the student is enrolled;
  • Find that a student who is at least 16 years old has repeatedly engaged in conduct while at school or while under the supervision of a school authority that disrupted the ability of school authorities to maintain order or an educational atmosphere at school or at an activity supervised by a school authority and that such conduct does not constitute grounds for expulsion under those items listed in a.-e. above, or
  • The Board shall expel a student from school whenever it finds that a student, while at school or while under the supervision of a school authority, possessed a firearm, as defined in U.S.C Title 18, 921(a)(3); and is satisfied that the interest of the school demands the student's expulsion.

Fees

Parents and guardians are required to pay annual school fees which cover the use of textbooks, hall lockers, physical education lockers and towels, special assemblies, and other supplies. The optional yearbook for middle and high school students is an additional fee that may be paid at the same time school fees are paid. Cost of fees is available on the Infinite Campus Portal or at the school office.
Flyer Distribution and Posters/Wall Displays

Elementary Flyer Program: Flyers from non-profit organizations receive approval from the Administrative Services Department. The district will establish a timeline for the distribution of flyers to all Kindergarten through Fifth grade children in each classroom one time per month. The district does not assume responsibility for flyers once distributed to students.

Direct distribution of flyers from outside agencies to all middle and high school students is prohibited unless in conjunction with a school sponsored activity. Outside organizations are encouraged to contact the newspaper, yearbook and/or athletic departments if they would be interested in purchasing advertising in school publications and/or programs.

All posters and wall displays must be approved by a building administrator. See Board Policy 1330 – Advertising and Promotion in the Schools and Board Policy 1340 - Sales and Solicitations for details on approval of promotional materials.
 

Gun Concealment

It is illegal for any student to carry a gun or dangerous weapon into a district school building; into a building rented by the school district; into a school district sponsored event that is not held in a school building or on school grounds; or to have a gun or dangerous weapon in a vehicle that is parked on school grounds (Board Policy 5236). Students possessing a gun or dangerous weapon at any of these sites will be reported to local police for arrest and are subject to disciplinary action including expulsion from school.

It is illegal for an adult to carry a gun or dangerous weapon into a district school building; into a building rented by the school district; or into a school district sponsored event that is not held in a school building or on school grounds (Board Policy 4139 and Board Policy 1325). Adults possessing a gun or weapon at any of these sites will be asked to leave the site and may be reported to the local police. Adults 21 years of age or older who have a permit to carry a concealed gun or weapon may have a locked gun or weapon in their vehicle in a school parking lot.

Health, Illness, Accidents

Please be sure that any injuries occurring in class or other supervised locations are reported to the teacher in charge and to the administration. An accident report form must be filed. Notice of injury is mandatory. The nurse will be in her office at posted times. Any ill or injured student should report to the attendance office where a nurse or other personnel can assist him/her and if necessary contact parents. Do not leave without contacting the office and do not miss class due to illness or injury without reporting to the attendance office. No medication may be given to students by staff with the exception of those medications registered with the assistant principals in the attendance office (Board Policy 5425). Limited first aid is available and in emergencies the paramedics will be called (Board Policy 5424).

A school nurse is on duty on a limited basis at each school. Students must obtain a pass from the classroom teacher before going to the school nurse.

A goal of the School District of Janesville is to ensure a healthy environment for all students. Parents are asked to please notify the school office of any infectious or communicable disease that their student has or that causes them to seek treatment for their student. By notifying the school, action can be taken to prevent further spread of the infectious or communicable diseases in the school and reduce the chance of a student re-contracting the disease when he/she returns to school.

Skin rashes, fungal infections, and antibiotic resistant bacteria can be part of the school environment. To help reduce the risk of these type infections in the school setting the school district is asking for parent assistance in the following ways:

  • Students with open sores or wounds should have them covered with a bandage.
  • Students with rashes or boils of unknown cause may be asked to seek medical care to rule out the possibility of a communicable skin condition or an antibiotic resistant bacteria causing the skin condition.
  • Parents should inform school staff any time their child has a skin rash or skin disease so proper precautions can be taken at school to prevent the rash or disease from spreading to another student or employee.

For information regarding the District’s Communicable Disease Control Policy, please refer to Board Policies 4136 and 5423. Call the District offices at 608-743-5000 with questions or concerns.
20

Homework Guidelines

"Homework should be a risk-free chance to experiment with new skills." Carr-Farr, 2002
"Homework as an extra credit option not attached to student learning is not an appropriate way to apply the principles of meaningful homework to increase student achievement."

BEST PRACTICES:

We know expectations of homework should include…

  • practicing new skills introduced in class without penalty
  • reviewing skills to prepare for assessment
  • directly related to instructional objectives and concepts
  • enriching background knowledge
  • expanding or integrating learned knowledge

We know student's perception of homework directly affect the following…

  • attitudes
  • stress level

We know diversity of parent involvement has an effect on homework completion due to…

  • economic diversity
  • ability to help based on background knowledge

We know changing parent and school relationship has an effect on homework completion due to…

  • erosion of absolute authority of the school
  • a fragile parent/school relationship due to personal school experiences

We know diversity of student activities outside of school has an effect on homework completion due to…

  • a need to balance academics and activities
  • a need to balance academics, leisure, and happiness

We know homework should not include more than 10% of the grade.
We know homework should be based on the ability and needs of the student as well as the student's total homework load.

RESOURCES:
Vatterott, Cathy. Rethinking homework: Best Practices That Support Diverse Needs. ASCD, Alexander, Virginia, USA 2009. Coutts, Pamela M. Meanings of Homework and Implications for Practice. Theory into Practice, Volume 42, Number 3, Summer 2004. College of Education. The Ohio State University, Wild, Elke & Knollmann, Martin. Quality of Parental Support and Student's Emotions During Homework: Moderating Effects of Student's Motivational Orientations. European Journal of Psychology of Education. 2007, Volume XXII, 63-76. Check, Scott J. Poll Of U.S. Teen Find Heavier Homework Load, More Stress Over Grades. http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/deliver?vid 2009. Guskey, Thomas. How's My Kid Doing?: A Parent’s Guide to Grades, Marks, and Report Cards., Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA 2002.

Immunization Policy

Please refer to Board Policy 5422 for specific details. All students who are admitted to the School District of Janesville shall provide a record of immunizations that are required by law. Parents/guardians need to submit a record of immunization or claim an immunization waiver. The school district will be responsible for maintaining an up-to-date immunization record. If you have questions on the policy, please call the District office at 608-743-5000.

Keeping Elementary Students “After School”

From time to time during the course of a school year, teachers may wish to ask students to remain after school for a number of appropriate reasons, usually to provide a student with individualized assistance.

Whenever a teacher decides to keep a student after school, students in grades 3 through 5 must be given an opportunity to contact their parent(s) to notify them that they will be staying at school beyond the normal dismissal time. If the parent cannot be contacted, the student should be allowed to go home at the usual time; however, the teacher should send a note home with the student indicating that the child will be remaining after school the next day. In the case of children in kindergarten through grade two, the teacher will make the parent contact indicating the need for a student to remain after school or send home a note to the parent indicating the child will be remaining after school the next day. This policy will not apply to those situations where a teacher, principal, counselor, etc. have formalized a continuing arrangement with a student's parent(s) whereby the student may be kept after school. In general, students should not be kept after school more than 30 minutes unless a special understanding has been agreed upon between the student's parent(s) and a school staff member.

McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Students Act

Students who lack a fixed, regular or adequate nighttime residence are protected by the McKinney-Vento act (Board Policy 5022). Although eligibility is determined on a case-by-case basis by the homeless liaison, the following situations often qualify.

  • Sharing the housing of others due to loss of housing or economic hardship
  • Living in a motel, hotel, or campground due to lack of alternative adequate accommodations
  • Living in an emergency shelter or transitional living program
  • Abandoned in a hospital
  • Living in a vehicle or RV, park, public space, abandoned building, substandard housing, bus or train station or other place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping space
  • Unaccompanied youth who are not in the physical custody of a parent or guardian, runaways, and youth denied housing by their parents.

Students who qualify for McKinney-Vento have the following rights:

  • Immediate enrollment: Even without the required documents
  • School choice: Students may stay at the school attended when they became homeless or they may enroll in the school in the area where they are currently living.
  • Free lunch: For the entire school year
  • School fee waivers: When requested by parents and verified by student services staff
  • Transportation: If the student is living outside of the attendance area of the school he or she is attending, transportation can be provided.

If you believe that your student may qualify, please contact your school social worker or the district Families in Transition Coordinator at 608-751-7779.

Medication Policy

Please refer to Board Policy 5425 and Administrative Regulation 5425.1 for procedures if you have a circumstance where your child will need to take medication (prescription or non-prescription) at school. Parents must make arrangements for students to take medication at school and complete the appropriate paperwork with the school nurse. If your child is allergic to bee stings or has any other life threatening condition, please contact the school office immediately so arrangements can be made to provide adequate care as needed

Parent-Teacher Conferences

The teacher and parent(s) should clarify goals and expectations, which will assist the child to grow as much as possible during the remaining months of the school year (Board Policy 6811).

During Parent-Teacher Conferences the following items should be discussed:

  1. Grade Level Expectations from the Standards Based Report Card
  2. Student's assessments and/or samples of work that show progress towards the grade level expectations from the Standards Based Report Card
  3. Student's behavior patterns.
  4. Class participation.
  5. Any other items deemed appropriate.

Physical Education Exclusions

All students are required to participate in physical education classes unless they have a written excuse, signed and dated, from their physician. This excuse should state the length of time the child is to be excused and the reason for the exclusion.

Prohibited Items

The use of the following items are prohibited on all School District of Janesville property:

  • Laser devices
  • Skateboards/Longboards/Hover boards
  • Throwing Snowballs or Ice
  • PDA
  • Rollerblades/Wheeled Shoes

Please see the Student Conduct Code for more details.
 

Removing a Student from the Classroom

The School District of Janesville recognizes its responsibility to create, foster, and maintain an orderly and safe classroom environment, conducive to teaching and to the learning process. Pursuant to Section 118.164, Wisconsin Statute, a teacher employed by the District may temporarily remove a pupil from the teacher’s class if the pupil violates the terms of the District’s Student Conduct Code (located at the end of this document). Long term removal of a student may also be considered by the school principal. The Student Conduct Code is printed in each school’s Parent/Student Handbook in the section entitled, “Student Conduct Code.” Removal from the classroom is a serious measure, and should not be imposed in an arbitrary, casual or inconsistent manner.
Prior to Removing a Student from the Classroom

Prior to removing a student from the classroom, the school and classroom teacher should have an intervention program in place. This program should include a procedure to deal with disruptive students in the classroom. Behavioral expectations need to be communicated as clearly as possible to students and parents. Actions taken by the teacher prior to removal of the student should be documented. There may be dangerous situations in which behavior requires the immediate removal of a student. The teacher should exercise his/her best judgment in deciding whether it is appropriate to remove a student temporarily from class.
Removing the Student from Class

Students may be removed from the classroom for violating the School District of Janesville’s Student Conduct Code. In cases where the student is disorderly or safety is at stake, the principal or his/her designee may be called upon to assist in the removal of a student. The teacher may seek the help of a colleague and escort the student out of the room. A student sent out of the room to the school office must be sent with a written explanation from the teacher describing the student conduct code violation. The student will be removed from the classroom for the duration of the class or activity. A recommendation for long term removal from the classroom may also be made. Interventions taken by the teacher prior to the removal of a student are documented and reviewed by the building principal. The decision for long-term (one-half day or more) removal from the classroom will be made by the building principal or his/her designee.

When the student is removed from the classroom, the principal or his/her designee will give the student due process. This will involve the notice of misbehavior, evidence (if necessary) and the opportunity for the student to tell his or her side of the story.

Placement Procedures

The Student Conduct Code specifies the disciplinary actions which may be applied when students violate the rules and regulations set forth in the code. After appropriate collaboration with teachers, administrators, or parents, the building principal or his/her designee determines the appropriate educational placement of a student who has been removed from class. Placements may be in an alternative education program, another class in the school, another instructional setting, a detention area, in-school suspension area, an out-of-school suspension, or other appropriate placements.

Parent/Guardian Notification Procedures

A copy of the School District of Janesville’s Student Conduct Code and this removal policy will be provided to each parent in the district.

When a student is suspended, every effort will be made by the principal or his/her designee to notify the parent/guardian by phone (if possible) the day of the incident and/or with written notice (Discipline Referral Form) sent by mail within 24 hours. It is the expectation that the parent will participate in a conference regarding the suspension if requested by the principal or his/her designee. Parent/guardians may also request a conference with school personnel.

Request to Withhold Directory Data: Release of Pupil Directory Data Information and High School Student Information to Military Recruiters and Institutions of Higher Education

In the course of a school year, groups of students are occasionally videotaped and/or photographed in classroom situations, during fine arts performances, on field trips, for teacher training, etc.

The resulting photo and/or videotape may be used in a variety of ways: to promote the school district, individual school, or specific programs to the community, to instruct students or staff members, or to orient new parents, staff and students. The final product could also take a variety of forms, photo displays, slide presentations, newspaper articles, pamphlets or video programs.

Wisconsin statutes provide that schools or school districts may legally release:

  • A pupil’s name Address Telephone listing Date and place of birth Photographs Grade level
  • Major field of study Participation in officially recognized activities and sports Weight and height of members of athletic teams Dates of attendance Degrees, honors, and awards received
  • Name of the school most recently previously attended by the pupil

The School District of Janesville will consider videotapes the same as photographs.

Such information may be withheld if the district is advised by the parent, legal guardian, or eligible student (18 years of age or older) to do so. If it is your wish NOT to allow the above information to be released, and if you are the parent, legal guardian, or eligible student, you must annually acknowledge the “Release to Withhold Directory Data" within Infinite Campus. If we do not have your acknowledgement of the request to withhold information within 14 days of the distribution of this handbook, we can then assume, according to state statutes, that the directory data listed above may be released if requested.

In addition, two federal laws require local educational agencies (LEAs) receiving assistance under the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 to provide military recruiters and institutions of higher learning, upon request, with three directory information categories – names, addresses and telephone listings – unless parents have advised the LEA that they do not want their student’s information disclosed without their prior written consent, we are required to provide this. This is a separate form (See Administrative Regulation 5500.1b and/or Administrative Regulation 5500.1c) that must be annually signed within 14 days of registration and is available at the high school offices.

Please understand if you request to withhold directory data your child will not have his/her picture or name in school yearbooks or student newspapers, sports programs, awards programs, music/drama programs, The Janesville Gazette (news stories, graduation issue) etc. There can be no exceptions.

School Delay/Closing Information

Should it become necessary to delay the start of school or to cancel school, the School District of Janesville will use the Infinite Campus Messenger system as our primary means of notification to parents and guardians. These messages are sent as a Priority message. We urge parents/guardians to make sure their contact information is always current and correct in the system.

In order to keep district telephone lines open for general operations, please do not call the district or your school for closing information/confirmation. In addition to using directing messaging to parents and guardians through Infinite Campus Messenger, the School District of Janesville utilizes many other forms of public communications to post or announce closing and delays, including: WCLO AM 1230 radio and other local radio stations; the Janesville Gazette; local and regional television stations; the School District of Janesville Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/SDJK12/); and the district website (https://www.janesville.k12.wi.us). If the closing and delay information is related to inclement weather, the district will communicate to the public the night before (if possible) or no later than 6:00am on the day of the closing or delay.

Decisions to delay or cancel school due to inclement weather are made in coordination with both the Janesville Transit System and the Van Galder Bus Company (Board Policy 5462). They are also based on the passage of city streets, safety of rural students and information from the county highway department and city street department. The School District of Janesville also consults with a meteorologist and a team of District staff and area Superintendents before the decision is made. The final decision to delay or close rests with the Superintendent. If school is not cancelled and families do not feel it is safe for their child to come to school, it is their prerogative to keep their student(s) home. Families choosing to keep students home will need to call the student’s school(s) to report their absences(s), which will be considered a principal excused absence.
The School District of Janesville does not close early in an attempt to avoid incoming snow or ice storms. This is to protect children who may get home before their families and have no home access or supervision. If a parent/guardian is concerned about incoming weather, they may come to the school to have their child released early, which will be considered a principal excused absence.

If schools are closed for weather related reason, be aware that all Preschool 4 Janesville (P4J) programs located in School District of Janesville Public Schools will also be closed. Should a decision be made to delay the start of school as opposed to closing, the School District of Janesville Public schools with P4J morning programs will be cancelled, but they will hold their afternoon sessions as regularly scheduled. If your child attends P4J at a private school location or community child care center, be sure to contact your P4J site coordinator to confirm any closings or delays.

Cancellation of Athletic or Extracurricular Events: There will be no athletic contests and no practices on days school is called off for weather reasons. The gyms will also be closed to the public on those days. On days when school is in session but weather has progressively worsened, cancellations for after school or evening athletics or extracurricular activities will be announced by 2:00 p.m. on WCLO radio that day and posted on the School District of Janesville Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/SDJK12/) and on the district website (https://www.janesville.k12.wi.us). The School District of Janesville calendar has several days built in to accommodate weather delays/closures. However, should the district exceed those buffer days, state law requires the School District of Janesville to make-up days to meet the minimum number of hours of direct public instruction (http://dpi.wi.gov/cal/days-hours).

Dismissal during Severe Weather/Tornado (Board Policy 5465): Every precaution has been taken to protect students and staff members during periods of severe weather. Students and staff are made aware of

predetermined areas of shelter to which they move during severe weather warnings. During times of weather warnings, students will be kept in their shelter areas beyond normal dismissal times and staff will remain with them. For safety reasons students will not be released until either the National Weather Service or local police or fire officials issue an “all clear” signal. Children will not be released to families during the time of a weather warning. Campus Messenger will serve as our primary means of notification to let parents know when students will be released

Sexual Harassment Policy

Please refer to Administrative Regulation 5021.1 if you feel your child has been subjected to a pattern of sexual harassment by a student or staff member. Pupils have a right to be in a school environment that is free from all forms of harassment, including sexual harassment, and anyone who engages in harassing behavior will be disciplined, including students.

Special Education

The School District of Janesville provides special education services for students who are impaired in the area of speech and language, specific learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, physically handicapped, emotional behavioral disabilities, hearing or vision impaired, autism, traumatic brain injury or, other health impaired. If you believe your child may qualify for any of these programs, please contact your child's teacher, the building principal, or the District Special Education Department at 743-5061. Special education policies and procedures are also available for review.

Student Appearance

Appearance should reflect the purpose or activity for which the student is participating. Our day to day operation is that of an educational business. We request the students to present themselves in a manner that reflects this serious business. School sponsored activities may adjust this appearance as we establish special dress up days.
Clothing worn by students should be neat and appropriate and should be worn as it was intended. (Example: bib overalls with straps up and attached, pants worn at the waist.)

Clothing or appearance should not cause a distraction in the classroom or be embarrassing to others. The school administration reserves the right to ask students to remedy the clothing or appearance that is considered distracting or inappropriate.

Underwear should not be visible for it may be offensive or embarrassing to the other students or staff.
Clothing and jewelry promoting alcohol, drugs, tobacco products, or gangs will not be tolerated. Also, clothing which has objectionable pictures, sexual meaning, or is otherwise offensive, is prohibited. Crop tops and short shorts are not allowed. Hats and jackets are not to be worn in the building and must be stored in a student’s assigned locker during the day. Chains are not allowed.

Students with inappropriate clothing will be referred to the office. Students will be allowed to change or to contact parents/guardians to bring appropriate clothing. Students will remain in the office until proper clothing is available.
Cross Reference: Inappropriate Clothing/Attire: Student Conduct Code.

Student Expectations

Students enrolled in the School District of Janesville are expected to:

  1. Attend school and scheduled classes on a daily basis unless ill or excused by school officials.
  2. Take advantage of all available resources and learning opportunities presented to them, and to develop and learn to the best of their abilities.
  3. Select courses with the purpose of achieving meaningful goals.
  4. Complete assigned work within the time designated.
  5. Challenge their intellect and not just work for grades.
  6. Give the best possible performance in all testing situations.
  7. Obey all rules, directives, and district policies, which are communicated either in writing or verbally.
  8. Participate in school-sponsored events and activities.
  9. Accept help from their classmates and be willing to help others when they can.
  10. Register complaints and concerns with those who have the most direct responsibility to address them.
  11. Students and parents should consult the Student Conduct Code for further conduct guidelines. The Student Conduct Code will have the same authority as the student rules outlined in student handbooks.
  12. Students are expected to be polite, helpful and considerate when a substitute teacher is present in the classroom. Uncooperative students should expect to receive disciplinary consequences from their regular classroom teacher.

Please also see Board Policy 6000 – District Beliefs, Goals and Expectations.


Student Lockers, Desks and Other District Property

Each student is issued a locker as a convenient place for books and personal property. Above all, lockers should be locked and the combinations kept private. Report any locker problems to the adviser/homeroom teacher.

Students should stay with the assigned locker and not move to a friend’s locker. Sharing a hall locker with a friend is prohibited. The school district assumes no responsibility for articles missing from lockers. Lockers are the property of the School District of Janesville and may be searched by school administrators at any time.

Ownership and control of lockers, desks, school-issued tablets and other District property is maintained by the school district. Students are granted use of desks, lockers, tablets and other district property in accordance with Board Policy 5231. The school district reserves the right to have a school official, or his/her designee, conduct a search at any time without consent of the student, without notifying the student and without obtaining a search warrant. Searches of student lockers and/or personal belongings will be reasonable. There should be reasonable grounds for suspecting that a search will yield contraband or turn up evidence that a student has or is violating the law, school rules or board policy. An administrator or his/her designee may contact law enforcement officials for assistance in conducting a search. Each building will distribute this policy information to enrolled students.
Students are responsible for the safekeeping of textbooks and library books which must be replaced at the student’s or parent’s expense if lost or damaged.

Students should share in the responsibility of keeping the district schools in their best possible condition. The Board views vandalism against school property by students as reprehensible. Any student who needlessly damages school property or equipment shall be held responsible and shall make restitution to the school in the amount determined by the administration. When a student is unable to make restitution, the parent or guardian shall be held liable.

Student Non-Discrimination (Disability, Religious Belief, Gender Identity Accommodation)
The School District of Janesville is committed and dedicated to providing the best education possible for every student in the District consistent with applicable legal requirements, school district policy and procedures (Board Policy 5020).

The right of the student to be admitted to school and to participate fully in curricular, extra-curricular, recreational, or other programs or activities and in student services shall not be abridged or impaired because of a student's sex, race, religion, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity or because of the person's physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability.

Students who have been identified as having a disability under either the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (Section 504) shall be provided reasonable accommodations as developed through Individualized Education Programs (IEP) or 504 Plans in accordance with federal and state rules and regulations. Accommodations will be developed with the intent of providing equal access and/or participation for these students across school environments.

The district shall also provide for the reasonable accommodation of a student's sincerely held religious beliefs with regard to examinations and other academic requirements. Requests for accommodations shall be made in writing by a parent/guardian and be approved by the building principal. Accommodations may include, but not necessarily be limited to, exemption from participation in an activity, alternative assignments, released time from school to participate in religious activities, and opportunities to make up work missed due to religious observances.

The district shall also provide for the reasonable accommodation of a student’s confirmed transgender identity with regard to access to single sex-designated school facilities and programs. Requests for accommodations shall be made in writing by a parent/guardian and be approved by the building principal. Accommodations may include, but not necessarily be limited to, use of the restroom designated for the gender with which the student identifies, use of the locker room designated for the gender with which the student identifies and reasonable access to other single-sex designated school facilities and programs.

This policy does not intend to prohibit the provision of special programs or services based on objective standards of individual need or performance to meet the needs of students, including gifted and talented, special education, school-age parents, bilingual bicultural, at-risk and other special programs, or programs designed to overcome the effects of past discrimination.

Complaints regarding the interpretation or application of this policy regarding students with a disability shall be referred to the District Administrator/designee. All other nondiscrimination complaints, including harassment and bullying complaints based on other legally protected discrimination factors, shall be referred to the District Administrator/designee. All complaints shall be processed in accordance with established procedures.

Notice of this policy and its accompanying complaint procedures shall be published at the beginning of each school year and posted in each school building in the district. In addition, a student nondiscrimination statement shall be included in student and staff handbooks, course selection handbooks, and other published materials distributed to the public describing school activities and opportunities.


Student Privacy: Survey and Opinion Polls

Curriculum Research/Pilot Projects

The Board of Education encourages research activities by the school system and urges application of research findings to instructional and managerial processes. The District Administrator is authorized to provide educational research services.

Services of internal and external researchers (1) make it possible for the Board and District Administrator to examine problems and plans in the light of current research, (2) provide guidance to the staff in helping individuals and groups carry out well-planned investigations, and (3) maintain liaison with educational research agencies. Research will be undertaken with approval of the District Administrator.

The Board also encourages action research in the form of experimental and pilot projects. As used here, "research or experimental program" means any program or project designed to explore or develop new content or unproven teaching methods or techniques.

Experimental and/or pilot projects may be recommended by staff members or curriculum committees. Experimental programs may be established in the area of instruction if approved by the principal of the building in which the program will be instituted, the District Administrator, or the Board if the research is other than routine. Proposals will include plans for evaluation of the program.

Survey and Opinion Polls

Surveys and polls which assess student attitudes or opinions regarding race, creed, sex, or other potentially controversial matters must be approved in advance by the District Administrator or a designee. The District Administrator will consult with the Board as he or she finds advisable. Building principals will approve in advance all other student surveys and opinion polls, referring questions to the District Administrator when in doubt.
No student shall be required to participate in any survey associated with a school program or the District’s curriculum, or which is administered by a third party in the schools, if the survey includes one or more of the following items:

  1. Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent/guardian;
  2. Mental and psychological problems of the student or the student’s family;
  3. Sex behavior or attitudes;
  4. Illegal, anti-social, self-incriminating or demeaning behavior;
  5. Critical appraisals of other individuals with whom students have close family relationships;
  6. Legally recognized privileged or analogous relationships such as those of lawyers, physicians, and ministers;
  7. Religious practices, affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent/guardian; or
  8. Income, other than that required by law to determine eligibility for participation in a program or for receiving financial assistance under such a program.

Parents/guardians may, upon request, inspect a survey containing any of the above information and any survey created by a third party before the survey is administered or distributed to a student. They may also request to inspect any instructional materials used in connection with the survey or any instructional material used as part of the educational curriculum for the student. Requests to inspect a survey or instructional materials should be made to the building principal and/or his designee. Survey inspection requests should be made prior to the date on which the survey is scheduled to be administered to students. The principal or designee shall respond to such requests without delay.

This policy shall be published annually in student and staff handbooks, which are distributed to students, parents/guardians and employees in the District (Board Policy 6210).

Student Records

Detailed information regarding the maintenance of student records can be found in Board Policy 5500 – Student Records.

Parents (both custodial and non-custodial) have well defined legal rights to their child's school records and related information; and have a right to attend parent/teacher conferences, unless there is a specific legal injunction prohibiting such access. All such inquiries related to access to student records should be directed to the building principal. Teachers may not give out copies of records without the approval of the building principal. Patient health care records shall be maintained separately from other pupil records.

Primary responsibility for maintaining the confidentiality of pupil records shall rest with the District Administrator or his/her designee.

Progress Records shall be maintained confidential except that:

  • An adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, shall, upon request, be shown and provided with a copy of such records.
  • Upon the written permission of an adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, such records shall be made available to the person named in the permission.
  • The judge of any court of this State or of the United States shall, upon request, be provided with a copy of such records of a pupil who is the subject of any proceeding in such court.
  • Such records shall be provided to a court in response to a subpoena by parties to an action for in camera inspection.
  • Such records may be made available to professional staff members employed in the school, which the pupil attends.
  • Information contained in such records may be provided to any public officer as required under Chapters 115 to 121 of the state statues. The Department of Public Instruction shall be provided with any information contained in a record that relates to an audit or evaluation of a federal or state supported program or that is required to determine compliance with Chapters 115 to 121. (Section 118.125(2)(g) 1 and 2 of the state statutes.)
  • Such records may be used in connection with the suspension or expulsion of the pupil or by an IEP team under Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 115.

Enrollment Cards, Patient Heathcare Records and Behavioral Records shall be maintained confidential except that:

  • An adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, shall, upon request, be shown such records in the presence of a person qualified to explain and interpret the records. Such pupil, or parent or guardian, shall, upon request, be provided with a copy of such record.
  • Such records may be made available to persons employed in the school which the pupil attends who are required by the Department of Public Instruction under Wisconsin Statutes 115.28(7) to hold a certificate, license or permit. Patient health care records may be released to others only with the informed written consent of the parent or legal guardian.
  • Upon the written permission of an adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, the school shall make available to the person named in the permission such portions of such record as determined by the person authorizing the release.
  • Such records shall be provided to a court in response to subpoena by parties to an action for in camera inspection, after notification has been given to the student, if an adult, or the parent or guardian of a minor student.
  • Information in such records may be provided to the Department of Public Instruction or any public officer if that information is required under Wisconsin Statutes, Chapters 115 to 121.
  • Such records may be used in connection with the suspension or expulsion of the pupil or by an IEP team under Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 115.

A student record noncompliance complaint may be filed with the Family Policy Compliance Office of the U.S. Department of Education.
Challenge to Records Content

If an adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, believes such pupil's records contain information that is inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of such pupil's rights, the pupil, parent or guardian, may so notify the District Administrator in writing specifying the offending information.

Within 15 calendar days after receipt of such notice, the District Administrator or his/her designee shall give the pupil, parent or guardian an opportunity to discuss the matter. After consideration of the views of such pupil, parent or guardian, the District Administrator or his/her designee shall make a determination as to whether and in what respect the information complained of should be corrected or deleted and so notify the pupil, parent or guardian in writing. Such notice shall be given within 20 days after such discussion is concluded.

If a pupil, parent or guardian is not satisfied with the decision of the District Administrator or his/her designee, such pupil, parent or guardian shall have a right to a hearing before the Board of Education as to whether the information complained of is inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of such pupil's rights, provided, however, in order to exercise such right, such pupil, parent or guardian must notify the Clerk of the Board of Education in writing within 20 days after receipt of the decision of the District Administrator or his/her designee.
If the Board of Education determines not to amend the record, the pupil, parent or guardian will be given the opportunity to place his/her own statement in the file.

Lengths of Time Records are to be Kept

  1.  A Pupil's Progress Record shall be kept for 75 years after the pupil is no longer enrolled in any school in the School District and then be destroyed.
  2.  A Pupil's Enrollment Card and Behavior Record shall be destroyed one year after the pupil graduated from or last attended the school, unless the pupil, if an adult, or the parent or guardian, if a minor, specifies in writing that such records may be kept for a longer period of time, provided, however, in no case shall such records be kept for more than 25 years after the pupil is no longer in any school in the District.


Transfer of Records to Another School or School District

A Pupil's Enrollment Card, Progress Record and Behavior Record shall be transferred to another school or school district upon written notice from an adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, that the pupil intends to enroll in such other school or school district or upon written notice from such other school or school district that the pupil has enrolled.


Transportation of Students by the School District

The School District of Janesville is responsible for the development of all school bus routes. Problems, questions, concerns or suggestions regarding school bus transportation should be directed to the Manager of Transportation and Purchasing (608-743-5016) or to Van Galder Bus Company. Please refer to Administrative Regulation 3710.1 for the complete regulations on transportation including details on what the requirements are to be eligible for school bus transportation through the School District of Janesville.

Students being transported are reminded that they are to conduct themselves in a lawful and orderly manner at all times. Students violating bus regulations are subject to disciplinary actions.

Use of Animals in the Classroom

Please refer to Board Policy 6734 for the complete procedure. The use of animals in the classroom is an integral part of the life science curriculum within the Janesville School District under conditions that ensure the safety and well-being of the students, staff, and the animal. Persons bringing animals into the school must receive written permission from the building principal.

If it is anticipated that live animals will be used in the classroom, parents should be notified so that any allergies or health problems can be determined. In the event that a student or staff member demonstrates an allergic reaction to the animal, the animal should be removed, unless a satisfactory accommodation to the student or staff member affected can be made.

Vision and Hearing Tests

Per Board Policy 5421 it is recommended that each student entering Kindergarten have an eye examination by an optometrist or evaluation by a physician. Vision screening through the School District of Janesville will only be completed when a parent or teacher referral is submitted. Hearing acuity referrals completed through district screening will be sent home for all students suspected of having problems. Families will be notified annually at the beginning of each school year of the specific or approximate dates during the school year when the screening of students is scheduled to take place. Families have the right to request in writing to opt their child out of participating in any screening provided by the district.

Visitors to the School

The experience of watching your child interact with others in a learning environment is something we encourage. We also know that when parents visit the classroom they give their child a feeling of cooperation between parents and teachers. Parents are requested to contact the building principal in advance to seek approval to schedule a classroom visit. All visitors must sign in with the school office and wear a visible visitor’s badge during their stay.
For safety reasons, visitors who are participating in classroom activities or chaperoning field trips, etc. must complete a volunteer form for approval. Approval is good for the current school year, with a background check completed each following year. Approved visitors must stop into the office to sign in and receive a visitor’s badge.

The final decision to accept or deny a visitor to the school, a classroom or on a field trip rests with the designated building or district administrator.

Parents wishing to have lunch with their children must sign in with the school office and wear a visible visitor’s badge during their stay, proceed directly to the lunch area, and sign out in the office after the lunch period.
Student visitors are allowed only with prior district approval, and teacher and principal permission.

For additional information on visiting or volunteering at your child’s school, please refer to Board Policy 1230 and Administrative Regulation 1230.1 – Volunteers in Schools; Board Policy 1240 and Administrative Regulation 1241.1 – Visitors to Schools; and Board Policy 1241 and Administrative Regulation 1241.1 - Registered Sex Offenders. The School District of Janesville recognizes its responsibility for the health and safety of all students and will take appropriate precautionary measures in situations where the District has been notified that a registered sex offender wishes to visit a school building or persons on school premises.

PART II: STUDENT CONDUCT CODE

Introduction

The School District of Janesville has created this Student Conduct Code to help each school within the District achieve our goal of a safe learning environment. It is important to recognize that an effective discipline plan is not an isolated technique, a specific process, or necessarily the skills of one professional. The Code not only informs students and parents of their responsibilities and rights, it also recognizes that a safe, orderly learning environment requires collaboration between teachers, students, parents and school administration.

The Student Conduct Code is designed to inform and advise. It lists prohibited actions (misconduct) and consequences for any misconduct. Consequences are not listed in priority order. Each misconduct will be addressed within the guidelines of this Code on an age appropriate basis.

We hope that the Student Conduct Code, in conjunction with “The Janesville Agreement,” will result in a community of respect leading to better learning experiences for our students. Thank you for your participation in this effort. Please contact the School District of Janesville with your comments.

The School District of Janesville believes that:

  • Learning cannot take place without a safe and orderly environment.
  • Every student has the right to attend school without fear of harm, physical threats, or verbal abuse.
  • It is the responsibility of each school in the District to create and maintain a safe and orderly environment.
  • High expectations for student behavior must be the standard throughout our schools.
  • Parents, students, and teachers must work together to promote responsible behavior; effective communication between the schools, the students and parents is the best way to foster positive student behavior.
  • The School District of Janesville does not discriminate against students on the basis of sex, race, religion, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, parental or marital status, sexual orientation, or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability.

The Student Conduct Code gives the rules and regulations that will help schools reach these goals.
Students are expected to abide by any and all established codes of conduct, board policies, conduct/behavior as outlined by the parent/student handbook and as stated in rules established by building principals for each school.

Disciplinary Definitions and Procedures

Students who violate the rules and regulations set forth in this manual are subject to one or more of the disciplinary actions described below. For certain single conduct violations, the maximum consequence will be immediately applied.

  • Conference A meeting with school staff.
  • Detention Requiring a student to remain at school beyond the normal school day or at lunch.
  • In-School Suspension The temporary removal of a student from his/her regular classroom to another supervised learning area for one to five days.
  • Out-of-School Suspension The removal of a student from school and school grounds for one to five days.
  •  
  • Pre-Expulsion Conference The purpose of this conference will be to convey to the student and parents that this is the last stop before the Board of Education. The conference will be documented with a letter to the parent/guardians from the person holding the conference. If an expulsion ultimately occurs, this letter will be used as part of the documentation.
  • Expulsion Recommendation: The removal of a student from school and school grounds for a time to be determined by the Board of Education.

Mandatory Reporting of Student’s Misconduct to Rock County Department of Human Services (RCHS)

The School District is required by state law to report incidents of sexual assault to the Department of Human Services.
Investigations and Arrests of Students on School Property (AR 5238.1)

A. Investigation Requested by School Authority

  1. The principal, or designee, may exercise discretion in determining whether or not to report antisocial behavior, disruptive conduct, disputes between two or more persons, or violations of building or school district rules to law enforcement officials. School District/City police liaison officers and/or other law enforcement officials in a school building may be asked to act in their official law enforcement capacity as may be determined by the principal or designee.
  2. The principal, or designee, will report activity that may constitute a crime and/ allegations of crimes to law enforcement officials. Crimes are identified as, but not limited to, crimes against life and bodily injury, crimes against public health and safety, and crimes against property.
  3. Upon the report of a potential crime by the principal, or designee, the law enforcement agent may assist or facilitate an investigation to be conducted within the school building or on school property during the school day. Should the investigation result in the interrogation of a student, the police shall contact the parent or guardian as determined by current statutory requirements and case law involving the interrogation of a juvenile. Should the investigation result in the arrest of a juvenile student, the police shall notify the parent or guardian. The principal, or designee, of elementary, middle and high school students may, if deemed necessary, notify the parent or guardian of the interview and/or may be present during the interview. The law enforcement officer assigned may interview student or employee witnesses in school, during the school day.

B. Investigation Not Requested by School Authority

  1. Law enforcement officers will make every effort to interview or interrogate students outside of school hours and outside of the school setting in those cases where assistance by school authorities has not been requested. Every effort to cooperate with law enforcement agencies while maintaining the legal rights of the student shall be made.
  2. Should it be necessary to interrogate student suspects, the law enforcement officer shall notify the student’s parent or guardian, as determined by current statutory requirements and case law involving the interrogation of a juvenile. The law enforcement officer will contact the principal, or designee, to obtain permission to conduct the interrogation at school.
  3. Should it be necessary to interview student witnesses at school, the law enforcement officer will contact the office of the principal to obtain permission to conduct the interview(s).
  4. Incidents of suspected child abuse or neglect may be investigated by law enforcement officers; the student victim can be interviewed without parental consent.
  5. In other situations involving questioning of students by non-school personnel not covered herein, the principal, or designee, shall exercise appropriate judgment pertaining to each individual situation.
  6.  

C. The Arrest or Taking into Custody of Students by Law Enforcement Officers for Infractions off Campus

  1. Law enforcement officers will make every effort not to arrest or take into custody any student in school during school hours. Law enforcement officers may arrest or take into custody any student, should the officer have an arrest warrant or other official court detention order, or if the officer determines the circumstances warrant immediate arrest or custody. The officer will contact the office of the principal when a student is to be arrested or taken into custody and the student shall be summoned to the principal’s office.
  2. In serious situations, the officer has the legal right to apprehend the student suspect on school district property. The officer, if reasonably possible, shall notify the principal, or designee, before removing the apprehended person from district property. The officer shall notify the parent or guardian of the student’s apprehension and/or arrest.

BATTERY

According to Wisconsin State Law, Battery is: “Causing “bodily harm to another by an act done with intent to cause bodily harm to that person or another without the consent of the person so harmed.”
This includes acts by individuals, gangs, or threat groups.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

DRUGS, ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND LOOK-ALIKE DRUGS

Possession, use, distribution, or sale of drugs, alcohol, tobacco, look-alike drugs or drug paraphernalia is prohibited on school premises before, during, or after school, or at any school-sponsored activity. According to Wisconsin State Law, drug/alcohol is defined as: “Any fermented malt beverage or intoxicating liquor, any controlled substance, counterfeit substance, or look-alike substance.”

According to Board Policy 5234, a student who shows a continuing problem or is suspected of being under the influence of drugs or intoxicants will be referred to the designated administrator or to guidance, health, or other trained staff for assessment.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Confiscate the drug, alcohol, tobacco or look-alike drug
  • Contact Network Team
  • Assessment
  • Educational Program
  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

ELECTRONIC DEVICES

Authorized electronic devices may be used with Administrator approval; however, they are prohibited in locker rooms and restrooms unless powered off in accordance with State Statute 175.22. Unauthorized devices are prohibited on school premises or at any school-sponsored activity. Personally owned electronic devices may be searched as permitted by law. Please refer to Board Policy 6724 and the related Administrative Regulations for the complete policy on Instructional Technology and the Acceptable Use Policy for Technology.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Confiscation
  • Detention
  • Parent Referral/Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Removal from premises

Maximum Consequences:

  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion
  • Recommendation for Expulsion

FALSE ALARMS/BOMB THREATS

Initiating a false fire alarm or initiating a false report warning of a weapon, fire or an impending bombing or catastrophe.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

FORGERY/CHEATING/ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Forgery/Cheating/Academic Dishonesty includes:

  • - Falsely using the name of another person.
  • - Falsifying times, dates, grades, addresses, or other data on school forms.
  • - Claiming or using the work or answers of another student or source as one’s own.
  • - Plagiarizing (using the ideas of someone else as one’s own ideas without acknowledging the source).
  • - Copying or stealing another person’s work.
  • - Allowing another person to copy one’s work.
  • - Doing another person’s class work.
  • - Intentionally accessing another person’s work to use it as one’s own.
  • - Disseminating a copy of another person’s work.
  • - Downloading information from online sources and representing it as one’s own work.
  • - Giving or receiving unauthorized assistance on exams.
  • - Altering grades or other academic records.
  • - Submitting identical work in more than one course without the prior approval of the instructor.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Loss of Grade/Grade adjustment
  • Conference
  • Verbal Warning
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

HARASSMENT/DISCRIMINATORY ACTS

Promoting negative stereotyping that degrades or flagrantly demeans any individual or group by negatively referring to the religion, socio-economic status, race, sex, national origin, creed, ancestry, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, pregnancy, or physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability of the individual or group. Also, disturbing an individual or group by name calling, pestering, or threatening.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Educational Program
  • Counseling
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

INAPPROPRIATE CLOTHING/ATTIRE

Clothing/attire is considered inappropriate if it is offensive or disruptive to the school environment as determined by staff/administration.

Inappropriate clothing includes, but is not limited to:

  • alcohol or drug-related clothing/jewelry
  • threat/hate group or gang-related clothing
  • clothes that contain a message that is discriminatory
  • clothing or attire that causes a distraction or is embarrassing to others
  • clothes that contain a negative message about any aspect of race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy or physical, mental, emotional or learning disabilities
  • hats may not be worn in the building

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Required to modify his/her attire
  • Parent Contact

Maximum Consequences:

  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension

INAPPROPRIATE LANGUAGE

Conduct, gestures, written or spoken language that is obscene, lewd, profane, vulgar, sexual, libelous, slanderous, or suggestive. “Swear words” are an example of inappropriate language.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

INAPPROPRIATE USE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT, NETWORKS AND SERVICE

Includes but is not limited to:

  • sending or displaying offensive messages or pictures
  • using obscene language
  • harassing, insulting or attacking others
  • loading software on district owned computers
  • damaging computers, computer systems or computer networks
  • violating copyright laws
  • using others’ passwords
  • trespassing in others’ files or work
  • intentionally wasting limited resources
  • using the network for commercial or for profitable purposes
  • using the network for personal, religious, political or private business
  • using the network to access pornographic or other inappropriate materials
  • portraying themselves on personal Internet Home Page as representatives of the School District of Janesville or an individual school
  • copying or using someone else’s work without their permission
  • using the district’s network to access or download music for personal use

Consequences: Students who commit any of the above listed acts of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Parent Contact
  • Denied access to telecommunications equipment, networks and services
  • Banned from bringing any software or data disks into school
  • Required to pay for all property damage
  • The Internet service provider will be notified
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension

Maximum Consequences:

  • Denied access to all district owned computer equipment, networks and services
  • Appropriate law enforcement agencies will be notified
  • Recommendation for Expulsion

PHYSICAL ATTACK ON STAFF MEMBER

Intentionally pushing or striking a School District staff member.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

REPEATED CLASSROOM DISRUPTION/CHRONIC DISRUPTION OR VIOLATION OF SCHOOL RULES

Repeatedly engaging in conduct on school premises before, during or after school or while under the supervision of a school authority that disrupts the ability of school authorities to maintain order or an educational atmosphere at school, in the classroom, or at an activity supervised by a school authority.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

REPEATED TARDINESS

Being late to school, class, or any other part of the student’s scheduled school day. Tardy for middle/ high school students is up to 5 minutes late for that class period.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Verbal Warning
  • Parent Contact 
  • Detention

Maximum Consequences:

  • In School Suspension

Referral to Interagency Attendance Committee

SAFETY VIOLATIONS/FIGHTING

Conduct or behavior which endangers the physical health or safety of any student or school employee on school premises before, during, or after school or at any school-sponsored activity.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Verbal Warning
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Removal from the course
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion
  • Parking Permit Revoked

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

SEXUAL ASSAULT

Sexual Assault is any act prohibited by Wisconsin Statutes, which includes “sexual contact” or “sexual intercourse” and is without the consent of the person with whom sexual contact or intercourse occurs. These terms have specific definitions in Wisconsin Statute.

 

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • The School District, as required by law, will report all incidents of sexual assault to the Rock County Department of Human Services.
  • The incident will be reported to district personnel.
  • The Police Department may be contacted regarding the incident.
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

THEFT

Intentionally taking or concealing the property of another person without the person’s consent.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Verbal Warning
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Payment for any damage to or loss of the property
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Police Referral
  • Pre-Expulsion
  • Probation Referral

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

THREATS OR INTIMIDATING ACTS

Threatening the well-being, health, or safety of an individual by verbal remarks, bullying or gestures.
Also, extorting or attempting to extort money or anything of value from a person on school premises before, during, or after school or at any school sponsored activity.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

TRUANCY

Unauthorized absence from school during any portion of the student’s scheduled day.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Truancy Abatement Center
  • Parking Permit Revoked 
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequences:

  • Lack of progress leading to failure Retention in the course
  • Repetition of the course
  • Referral to Interagency Attendance Committee for possible court action

VANDALISM/GRAFFITI

Intentional damage or defacing of property belonging to the school or others.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Payment for any damage to or loss of the property
  • Detention
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion
  • Clean, repair damaged or defaced property

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

VERBAL ATTACK ON STAFF MEMBER

Threatening the well-being, health, or safety of any staff member with words or gestures.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

WEAPONS

Possession or use of a weapon (defined below) on school premises before, during, or after school or at any school sponsored activity is prohibited.
 

Prohibited Weapons:

  • 1. Articles designed or commonly used to intimidate and/or inflict bodily harm on other persons. This category of weapons includes, but is not limited to: firearms (loaded and unloaded), BB guns, pellet guns, look-alike weapons, toy guns, knuckles, razors, switch blades, and any other types of knives, chains, clubs or stars.
  • 2. Articles designed for other purposes but used or intended to be used to intimidate and/or inflict bodily harm on other persons. This category includes, but is not limited to: belts, combs, jewelry, pencils, files, compasses, aerosol sprays, or scissors.
     

Search for Weapons:
In accordance with School Board policy, school personnel may search desks, school lockers, as well as book bags, gym bags, coats or jackets, or other personal property a student may bring onto school grounds or into a school building. Please refer to Board Policy 5270 and the related Administrative Regulations for the complete policy on Student Searches and Seizures.

Weapons Not Prohibited:
This includes all normally prohibited weapons that a student may bring to school for an authorized curricular use. Such weapons must be approved in advance by the teacher in whose class the weapon will be shown and by the building administration.

Consequences for possessing or using a weapon on school premises before, during, or after school, or at any school- sponsored activity are severe.

Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

  • Confiscate the weapon 
  • Conference
  • Detention
  • Parent Contact
  • Police Referral
  • Probation Referral
  • In School Suspension
  • Out of School Suspension
  • Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

  • Recommendation for Expulsion

POLICY OF THE JANESVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT ON YOUTH GANGS

The School District of Janesville recognizes that a school must create and maintain a safe and orderly environment in which learning can take place.

The presence of gangs, gang affiliations and gang-related activities within a school disrupts the learning environment by threatening the safety of students, staff, and parents in the school building and causing disruption to and interference with the academic process.

The School District of Janesville bars all gangs, gang affiliations and gang-related activities from school buildings, school property, and school-related activities at all times.

 

Middle / High School Conduct Code Handbook

School District of Janesville MIDDLE SCHOOL PARENT/STUDENT HANDBOOK 2017-2018

Addendum Compiled by the Administrative Services Department Updated 6-28-17

TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 
A. Student Non-Discrimination (BP 5020, August 2014) 1
B. Discrimination Complaint Procedures (AR 5020.2, August 2014) 2
C. Student Attendance: Middle and High School (BP 5141, May 2017, AR 5141.1, May 2017) 3
D. Student Privacy: Survey and Opinion Polls (BP 6210, July 2009) 4
E. Student Records (AR 5500.1, April 2003)  5
F. Request to Withhold Directory Data 6
G. Special Education 7
H. Electronic Devices 8
I. Bullying Prevention (BP 5030, July 2014) 9
J. SCHOOL DISTRICT OF JANESVILLE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES HANDBOOK: 2017-2018 10
*Guidelines For The Acceptable Use Of Technology 10
*Homeless Students: McKinney-Vento Education For Homeless Children And Youth Act 10
*Visitors To The School 10
*WEATHER – “Inclement Weather/School Closing Information 10
*School Nutrition Meal Charge Policy 10
K. Middle / High School Conduct Codes - Revised 3/17 11
L. SDJ Policy on Youth Gangs 12

Removed from Handbook:

 Delayed Opening of School (merged with Weather – Inclement Weather/School Closing Information and renamed School Delay/Closing Information)

 No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

 PBIS Behavioral Referral Form

BP = Board Policy AR = Administrative Regulation Complete Board Policies and Administrative Regulations may be viewed on-line, at your school office, or at the Educational Services Center, 527 S. Franklin Street.

 

1.

 

A. Student Non-Discrimination (BP 5020, August 2014)

The School District of Janesville is committed and dedicated to providing the best education possible for every student in the District consistent with applicable legal requirements, school district policy and procedures. The right of the student to be admitted to school and to participate fully in curricular, extracurricular, recreational, or other programs or activities and in student services shall not be abridged or impaired because of a student's sex, race, religion, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity or because of the person's physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability. Students who have been identified as having a disability under either the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (Section 504) shall be provided reasonable accommodations as developed through Individualized Education Programs (IEP) or 504 Plans in accordance with federal and state rules and regulations. Accommodations will be developed with the intent of providing equal access and/or participation for these students across school environments.

The district shall also provide for the reasonable accommodation of a student's sincerely held religious beliefs with regard to examinations and other academic requirements. Requests for accommodations shall be made in writing by a parent/guardian and be approved by the building principal. Accommodations may include, but not necessarily be limited to, exemption from participation in an activity, alternative assignments, released time from school to participate in religious activities, and opportunities to make up work missed due to religious observances.

The district shall also provide for the reasonable accommodation of a student’s confirmed transgender identity with regard to access to single sex-designated school facilities and programs. Requests for accommodations shall be made in writing by a parent/guardian and be approved by the building principal. Accommodations may include, but not necessarily be limited to, use of the restroom designated for the gender with which the student identifies, use of the locker room designated for the gender with which the student identifies and reasonable access to other single-sex designated school facilities and programs. This policy does not intend to prohibit the provision of special programs or services based on objective standards of individual need or performance to meet the needs of students, including gifted and talented, special education, school-age parents, bilingual bicultural, at-risk and other special programs, or programs designed to overcome the effects of past discrimination. Complaints regarding the interpretation or application of this policy regarding students with a disability shall be referred to the District Administrator/designee.

All other nondiscrimination complaints, including harassment and bullying complaints based on other legally protected discrimination factors, shall be referred to the District Administrator/designee. All complaints shall be processed in accordance with established procedures. Notice of this policy and its accompanying complaint procedures shall be published at the beginning of each school year and posted in each school building in the district. In addition, a student nondiscrimination statement shall be included in student and staff handbooks, course 4 selection handbooks, and other published materials distributed to the public describing school activities and opportunities.

 

2.

 

B. Discrimination Complaint Procedures (AR 5020.2, August 2014)

Any complaint by a student or his/her parent or guardian regarding the interpretation or application of the provisions of state and federal nondiscrimination legal requirements and the District’s student nondiscrimination policy shall be processed in accordance with the following complaint procedures. Complaints pertaining to students with a disability shall be referred to the District Special Education Department. Other discrimination complaints, including harassment complaints based on protected discrimination factors, shall be directed to the District Student Services Department. These complaint procedures do not diminish or otherwise replace the rights of students or parents/guardians to pursue claims or issues through other legally-mandated procedures such as Section 504 or Individuals with Disabilities Education Act due process complaints and hearings.

Informal Procedure The student or parent/guardian who believes there is a valid basis for a complaint shall attempt to resolve the complaint by discussing the concern with the building principal. The Student Services Department, and/or designee, will attempt to resolve the complaint if the principal is the person alleged to have discriminated against the student. A prompt and impartial investigation will occur with a response to the complainant within seven (7) days. If this reply is not acceptable to the complainant, he/she may initiate formal procedures according to the steps listed.

Step One

A written statement of the complaint shall be prepared with a signature by the complainant and submitted to the principal and/or Student Services Department/designee within ten (10) days after the known occurrence of the act or event.

The written complaint shall be submitted to:

Title IX/Discrimination Complaint Officer Educational Services Center

527 S. Franklin Street Janesville, WI 53548-4779

The principal, and/or Student Services Department/designee, upon receiving such a written complaint, shall further investigate the complaint. The principal, and/or Student Services Department/designee, shall, within fifteen (15) days after the completion of the investigation, decide the merits of the case, determine the action to be taken, if any, and report in writing the findings and resolution of the case to the complainant and the accused.

Step Two

If the complainant is dissatisfied with the decision of the principal, and/or Student Services Department/designee, he/she may appeal the decision by giving written notice to the District Administrator within five (5) days after the receipt of the written decision. The District Administrator/ designee shall schedule and hold a meeting with the aggrieved party within fifteen (15) days. The District Administrator shall, within five (5) days after the meeting, deliver a written response to the aggrieved party and to the accused.

Step Three

If the complainant is dissatisfied with the decision of the District Administrator/designee, the complainant may appeal the decision by giving written notice, thereof to the Board Clerk within five (5) days after receipt of the District Administrator/designee’s decision. The Board shall hear the appeal within fifteen (15) days. It shall make its decision in writing within five (5) days after the completion of the hearing. Within five (5) days, copies of the written decision shall be mailed or delivered to the complainant, the District Administrator/designee, and the accused.

Failure of the complainant to act within the time specified shall mean acceptance of the decision rendered at the last step, or may indicate that the complaint is being pursued through other avenues afforded by law. Failure of the principal, Director of Student Services/designee, District Administrator/designee to act within the times specified shall cause the complainant to proceed to the next step of this procedure.

A written determination of the complaint must be made within 90 days of receipt of the written complaint unless the parties agree to an extension of time. An explanation of the complainant’s right to appeal the District’s decision to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction within 30 days of the decision must be stated in the letter.

Step Four

If the complainant is still dissatisfied, further appeal may be made within thirty (30) calendar days to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. A complaint or appeal based on Title IX, Title VI, Section 504, or the Americans with Disabilities Act may be made to the U.S. Office for Civil Rights – Region V in Chicago. Complaint Procedure -- Federal Programs Discrimination complaints relating to programs specifically governed by federal law or regulation [e.g. Education Department General Administrative Regulations - EDGAR complaints) shall be referred directly to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Complaint Procedure – Special Education Discrimination complaints relating to the identification, evaluation, educational placement, or the provision of free appropriate public education of a student with a disability shall be 6 processed in accordance with established appeal procedures outlined in the District's special education handbook.

Complaint Procedures -- Section 504 Complaints Discrimination complaints relating to discrimination prohibited by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 shall be processed in accordance with the established complaint procedures unless the student or parent/guardian requests an Impartial Due Process Hearing in place of the grievance procedures. Impartial hearings shall be conducted in accordance with established procedures that entitle the student or parent/ guardian and his/her counsel, if any, to full participation including the right to present evidence. Maintenance of Complaint Records The maintenance of complaint records is recommended for the purpose of documenting compliance.

 

Records shall be kept for each complaint filed and, at a minimum, include the following:

1. Name and address of the complainant and his/her title or status,

2. Date the complaint was filed,

3. Specific allegation made and any corrective action requested by the complainant,

4. Name and address of the respondents,

5. Levels of processing followed, and the resolution, date and decision-making authority at each level,

6. Summary of facts and evidence presented by each party involved 

7. Determination of the facts, statement of the final resolution, and the nature and date(s) of any corrective or remedial action taken.

 

3.

 

Student Attendance: Middle and High School (BP 5141, May 2017, AR 5141.1, May 2017) Wisconsin has a Compulsory School Attendance Law. Accordingly, the School District of Janesville has adopted a Board Policy and Administrative Regulation consistent with the provisions of this State Law.

The State Statute establishes the following definitions:

Truancy: Any absence of part or all of one or more school days during which the school attendance officer, principal, or teacher has not been notified of the legal cause of such absence by the parent or guardian of the absent student. It also means intermittent attendance carried on for the purpose of defeating the intent of the compulsory attendance law.

Habitual Truant: A pupil who is absent from school without an acceptable excuse part, or all of five (5) or more days, on which school is held during a school semester. In accordance with state law, all children between six (6) and eighteen (18) years of age, and all children enrolled in 5-year-old kindergarten, must attend school during the period and hours that school is in session until the end of the term, quarter, or semester in which they become eighteen (18) years of age, unless they have a legal excuse, fall under one of the exceptions in the State Statutes, or have graduated from high school. Students may not be absent without excuse for more than any part or all of five (5) or more days on which school is held during a school semester.

Students are limited to ten (10) days of excused absences per year, except as otherwise provided in this policy. For a planned absence to be an excused absence, the student must be excused in writing by his or her parent or guardian before the absence. The student is required to complete any course work missed during the absence.

Although students of legal age may not be subject to laws governing compulsory school attendance, they are nonetheless subject to the rules set forth in this policy governing excused absences, and may be subject to discipline for failing to comply with those rules. Approval of excused absences for students of legal age is governed by Board Policy 5240. Excused absences not counted against the ten (10) day limit per year are those resulting from the following.

A religious holiday

B. A written medical excuse by a medical practitioner as permitted by state law. (Medical practitioner refers to any one of the following: licensed physician, dentist, chiropractor, optometrist, psychologist, physician assistant, nurse practitioner (as defined by state statute), certified advanced practice nurse prescriber or Christ Science practitioner who lives and resides in this state.)

C. A death in the immediate family or a funeral for a close relative. Elementary and middle school students excused for funeral attendance must be accompanied by their parent or guardian. High school students may be excused for funeral attendance with written authorization from a parent or guardian.

D. A court appearance or other legal procedure which requires the attendance of the student. The absence will only be excused for the time required for travel and appearance.

E. A school-ordered suspension.

F. A waiver authorized by the building principal or his/her agent in special cases where he/she determines that exceptional circumstance exist, including, but not limited to, a waiver for the purpose of serving as an election official as permitted under state law.

A student who has reached sixteen (16) years of age may be excused by the Board from regular school attendance if he/she has requested permission to be excused; the school has received written approval of the student’s parent or guardian; the student and his/her parent or guardian agree, in writing, that the student will participate in a program or curriculum modification as defined by state law leading to the student’s high school graduation; and the Board of Education has approved the student’s request to be excused and the program or curriculum modification.

Upon the student’s request and with the written approval of the student’s parent or guardian, any student who is seventeen (17) years of age or over may be excused by the Board from regular 8 school attendance if the student and his/her parent or guardian agree, in writing, that the student will participate in a program or curriculum modification as defined by state law leading to the student’s high school graduation or leading to a high school equivalency diploma.

The Board of Education may approve the student’s request to be excused and the program or curriculum modification. The School District of Janesville shall not deny a student credit in a course or subject solely because of a student’s unexcused absences or suspension from school. However, the School Board shall establish necessary guidelines to enhance the full attendance requirements and to determine appropriate action to serve as a deterrent to truancy.

The following provisions of the Attendance Policy are important for parents and guardians to note:

1. Parents or guardians should notify a school's attendance officer of an absence by telephone, email, or written note, prior to 8:30 a.m. on the day of absence, or in advance of the day of absence if the absence is planned. The principal reserves the right to request both a phone call and an e-mail or written note as circumstances warrant.

2. The school will attempt to contact parent/guardian by numbers provided for home, work, or other contact number before the end of the second school day after the unexcused absence is noted.

3. Middle and high school students who are tardy in excess of fifteen (15) minutes will be recorded as absent for that class.

4. All students with excused absences shall make up work missed. It is the student’s responsibility to immediately contact the teacher(s) to make arrangements for making up work missed during an excused absence from school. A planned excused absence form is required for planned absences. Homework, formative assessments, and summative assessments missed shall be made up in accordance with school district approved grading procedures. Examinations missed during an excused absence shall be permitted to be taken at a time mutually agreed upon by the student and the teacher. Unexcused/truant students are permitted to make up all exams, formative assessments, and summative assessments in accordance with school district approved grading procedures.

5. The school's attendance officer or principal will notify parents or guardians after a student has been absent the five allowable days during a school semester under the provisions of this policy. A letter will be sent to the parents or guardians of habitual truants when their absences warrant that designation under the provisions of the attendance policy.

A complete copy of the School District Attendance Policy 5141 and Administrative Regulation 5141.1 is available for reading online, at any school office or at the Educational Services Center at 527 S. Franklin Street, Janesville. Questions concerning this policy may be directed to your building principal.

Parents or guardians may review their student’s attendance record through the Infinite Campus system. If a parent or guardian believes their student has an error in their attendance record the parent or guardian should put in writing the date(s) they feel are in error and why they are in error. They should also include copies of any documentation from a doctor’s office, etc. which could lead to correction of the error. This information should be brought to the attendance clerk at the student’s school.

Students who are in the School District of Janesville under the State of Wisconsin Open enrollment program can have their open enrollment terminated at the end of the attendance semester or school year if they are habitually truant under this policy D. Student Privacy: Survey and Opinion Polls (BP 6210, July 2009) Curriculum Research/Pilot Projects The Board of Education encourages research activities by the school system and urges application of research findings to instructional and managerial processes.

 

4.

 

The District Administrator is authorized to provide educational research services. Services of internal and external researchers (1) make it possible for the Board and District Administrator to examine problems and plans in the light of current research, (2) provide guidance to the staff in helping individuals and groups carry out well-planned investigations, and (3) maintain liaison with educational research agencies. Research will be undertaken with approval of the District Administrator. The Board also encourages action research in the form of experimental and pilot projects. As used here, "research or experimental program" means any program or project designed to explore or develop new content or unproven teaching methods or techniques. Experimental and/or pilot projects may be recommended by staff members or curriculum committees.

Experimental programs may be established in the area of instruction if approved by the principal of the building in which the program will be instituted, the District Administrator, or the Board if the research is other than routine. Proposals will include plans for evaluation of the program.

Survey and Opinion Polls Surveys and polls which assess student attitudes or opinions regarding race, creed, sex, or other potentially controversial matters must be approved in advance by the District Administrator or a designee. The District Administrator will consult with the Board as he or she finds advisable. Building principals will approve in advance all other student surveys and opinion polls, referring questions to the District Administrator when in doubt.

No student shall be required to participate in any survey associated with a school program or the District’s curriculum, or which is administered by a third party in the schools, if the survey includes one or more of the following items:

1. Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent/guardian;

2. Mental and psychological problems of the student or the student’s family;

3. Sex behavior or attitudes;

4. Illegal, anti-social, self-incriminating or demeaning behavior;

5. Critical appraisals of other individuals with whom students have close family relationships

6. Legally recognized privileged or analogous relationships such as those of lawyers, physicians, and ministers 

7. Religious practices, affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent/guardian

8. Income, other than that required by law to determine eligibility for participation in a program or for receiving financial assistance under such a program.

Parents/guardians may, upon request, inspect a survey containing any of the above information and any survey created by a third party before the survey is administered or distributed to a student. They may also request to inspect any instructional materials used in connection with the survey or any instructional material used as part of the educational curriculum for the student. Requests to inspect a survey or instructional materials should be made to the building principal and/or his designee.

Survey inspection requests should be made prior to the date on which the survey is scheduled to be administered to students. The principal or designee shall respond to such requests without delay. This policy shall be published annually in student and staff handbooks, which are distributed to students, parents/guardians and employees in the District.

 

5.

 

Student Records (AR 5500.1, April 2003)

Parents (both custodial and non-custodial) have well defined legal rights to their child's school records and related information; and have a right to attend parent/teacher conferences, unless there is a specific legal injunction prohibiting such access. All such inquiries related to access to student records should be directed to the building principal. Teachers may not give out copies of records without the approval of the building principal. Patient health care records shall be maintained separately from other pupil records. Primary responsibility for maintaining the confidentiality of pupil records shall rest with the District Administrator or his/her designee.

Progress Records shall be maintained confidential except that:

a. An adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, shall, upon request, be shown and provided with a copy of such records.

b. Upon the written permission of an adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, such records shall be made available to the person named in the permission.

c. The judge of any court of this State or of the United States shall, upon request, be provided with a copy of such records of a pupil who is the subject of any proceeding in such court.

d. Such records shall be provided to a court in response to a subpoena by parties to an action for in camera inspection.

e. Such records may be made available to professional staff members employed in the school, which the pupil attends.

f. Information contained in such records may be provided to any public officer as required under Chapters 115 to 121 of the state statues. The Department of Public Instruction shall be provided with any information contained in a record that 11 relates to an audit or evaluation of a federal or state supported program or that is required to determine compliance with Chapters 115 to 121. (Section 118.125(2)(g) 1 and 2 of the state statutes.

g. Such records may be used in connection with the suspension or expulsion of the pupil or by an IEP team under Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 115.

2. Enrollment Cards, Patient Heath Care Records and Behavioral Records shall be maintained confidential except that:

a. An adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, shall, upon request, be shown such records in the presence of a person qualified to explain and interpret the records. Such pupil, or parent or guardian, shall, upon request, be provided with a copy of such record.

b. Such records may be made available to persons employed in the school which the pupil attends who are required by the Department of Public Instruction under Wisconsin Statutes 115.28(7) to hold a certificate, license or permit. Patient health care records may be released to others only with the informed written consent of the parent or legal guardian.

c. Upon the written permission of an adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, the school shall make available to the person named in the permission such portions of such record as determined by the person authorizing the release.

d. Such records shall be provided to a court in response to subpoena by parties to an action for in camera inspection, after notification has been given to the student, if an adult, or the parent or guardian of a minor student.

e. Information in such records may be provided to the Department of Public Instruction or any public officer if that information is required under Wisconsin Statutes, Chapters 115 to 121. f. Such records may be used in connection with the suspension or expulsion of the pupil or by an IEP team under Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 115. 3.

A student record noncompliance complaint may be filed with the Family Policy Compliance Office of the U.S. Department of Education. Challenge to Records Content If an adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, believes such pupil's records contain information that is inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of such pupil's rights, the pupil, parent or guardian, may so notify the District Administrator in writing specifying the offending information. Within 15 calendar days after receipt of such notice, the District Administrator or his/her designee shall give the pupil, parent or guardian an opportunity to discuss the matter.

After consideration of the views of such pupil, parent or guardian, the District Administrator or his/her designee shall make a determination as to whether and in what respect the information complained of should be corrected or deleted and so notify the pupil, parent or guardian in writing. Such notice shall be given within 20 days after such discussion is concluded.

If a pupil, parent or guardian is not satisfied with the decision of the District Administrator or his/her designee, such pupil, parent or guardian shall have a right to a hearing before the Board of 12 Education as to whether the information complained of is inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of such pupil's rights, provided, however, in order to exercise such right, such pupil, parent or guardian must notify the Clerk of the Board of Education in writing within 20 days after receipt of the decision of the District Administrator or his/her designee.

If the Board of Education determines not to amend the record, the pupil, parent or guardian will be given the opportunity to place his/her own statement in the file.

E: Lengths of Time Records are to be Kept

1. A Pupil's Progress Record shall be kept for 75 years after the pupil is no longer enrolled in any school in the School District and then be destroyed.

2. A Pupil's Enrollment Card and Behavior Record shall be destroyed one year after the pupil graduated from or last attended the school, unless the pupil, if an adult, or the parent or guardian, if a minor, specifies in writing that such records may be kept for a longer period of time, provided, however, in no case shall such records be kept for more than 25 years after the pupil is no longer in any school in the District.

Transfer of Records to Another School or School District A Pupil's Enrollment Card, Progress Record and Behavior Record shall be transferred to another school or school district upon written notice from an adult pupil, or the parent or guardian of a minor pupil, that the pupil intends to enroll in such other school or school district or upon written notice from such other school or school district that the pupil has enrolled.

 

6.

 

F: Request to Withhold Directory Data: Release of Pupil Directory Data Information and High School Student Information to Military Recruiters and Institutions of Higher Education (AR 5500.1a, August 2003) In the course of a school year, groups of students are occasionally videotaped and/or photographed in classroom situations, during fine arts performances, on field trips, for teacher training, etc. The resulting photo and/or videotape may be used in a variety of ways: to promote the school district, individual school, or specific programs to the community, to instruct students or staff members, or, to orient new parents, staff and students.

The final product could also take a variety of forms, photo displays, slide presentations, newspaper articles, pamphlets or video programs. Wisconsin statutes provide that schools or school districts may legally release: A pupil’s name Address Telephone listing Date and place of birth Photographs Grade level Major field of study Participation in officially recognized activities and sports Weight and height of members of athletic teams Dates of attendance Degrees, honors, and awards received Name of the school most recently previously attended by the pupil The School District of Janesville will consider videotapes the same as photographs.

Such information may be withheld if the district is advised by the parent, legal guardian, or eligible student (18 years of age or older) to do so. If it is your wish NOT to allow the above information to be released, and if you are the parent, legal guardian, or eligible student, you must annually acknowledge the “Release to Withhold Directory Data" within Infinite Campus. If we do not have your acknowledgement of the request to withhold information within 14 days of the distribution of this handbook, we can then assume, according to state statutes, that the directory data listed above may be released if requested. Please understand if you request to withhold directory data your child will not have his/her picture or name in school yearbooks or student newspapers, sports programs, awards programs, music/drama programs, The Janesville Gazette (news stories, graduation issue) etc.

There can be no exceptions. In addition, two federal laws require local educational agencies (LEAs) receiving assistance under the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 to provide military recruiters and institutions of higher learning, upon request, with three directory information categories – names, addresses and telephone listings – unless parents have advised the LEA that they do not want their student’s information disclosed without their prior written consent, we are required to provide this. This is a separate form (See Administrative Regulation 5500.1b and/or Administrative Regulation 5500.1c) that must be annually signed within 14 days of registration and is available at the high school offices.

 

7.

 

Special Education The School District of Janesville provides special education services for students who are impaired in the area of speech and language, specific learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities, physically handicapped, emotional behavioral disabilities, hearing or vision impaired, autism, traumatic brain injury, or other health impaired. If you believe your child may qualify for any of these programs, please contact your child’s teacher, the building principal, or the District Special Education Department at 743-5061.  Special education policies and procedures are also available for review.

 

8.

 

H. Electronic Devices Authorized electronic devices may be used with Administrator approval; however, they are prohibited in locker rooms and restrooms unless powered off in accordance with State Statute 175.22. Unauthorized devices are prohibited on school premises or at any school-sponsored activity. Personally owned electronic devices may be searched as permitted by law. Please refer to Board Policy 6724 and the related Administrative Regulations for the complete policy on Instructional Technology and the Acceptable Use Policy for Technology.

 

9.

I. Bullying Prevention (BP 5030, July 2014) The School District of Janesville Board of Education strives to provide an educational environment where every student feels safe, respected and welcomed. The Board also strives 14 to provide an educational environment where every staff member can serve students in a atmosphere that is free from significant disruptions and obstacles that impede learning and performance.

Bullying can have harmful social, physical, psychological and/or academic effects for those who engage in these behaviors, victims of such behaviors, and bystanders who observe acts of bullying. The District prohibits any form of bullying behavior by students towards other students, school employees, volunteers, or any other person(s). Bullying includes aggressive or hostile behavior that is intentional and involves an imbalance of power between the bully and the bullied. Bullying is a form of victimization and is not necessarily a result of or part of an on-going conflict. Bullying is defined as any conscious, willful, or deliberate acts, or attempted acts, through the use of words, images, gestures or other physical actions, including electronically transmitted acts, that are intended to cause physical injury, emotional distress or property damage.

Bullying includes, but is not limited to, behaviors motivated by an actual or perceived distinguishing characteristic or factor including sex, race, national origin, ancestry, religion, color, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability or handicap.

Bullying may also be motivated by any other distinguishing factor such as gender identity, physical appearance, or social, economic or family status. Examples of acts of bullying include physical intimidation, force or assault, humiliation, sexual or racist remarks, extortion, verbal or written threats, taunting, put downs, name calling, threatening or menacing looks or gestures, spreading cruel rumors, and social exclusion.

This includes acts of cyber-bullying that involve sending or posting inappropriate, insulting or threatening messages or images through electronic communication systems such as the Internet, e-mail, cell phones or other personal devices. Bullying is prohibited on District grounds, at District-related activities, or on transportation to and from school or District-sponsored activities.

Harassing bullying behavior is prohibited in all educational environments, regardless of whether the facility or location is owned, leased, or otherwise used or provided by the District. Acts of bullying that originate off school premises and outside of the school’s control may be subject to the provisions of this policy and related procedures if the conduct is determined to be substantially disruptive to the educational process and the day-to-day operations of a school.

This includes, but is not limited to, threats made outside of school hours that communicate intent to be carried out during any school-related or school-sponsored program or activity, or on any vehicles used for transportation to and from school and school-sponsored activities.

All complaints about bullying shall be promptly investigated. The District shall respect the privacy of the complainant, the individual(s) against whom the complaint is filed, and the witnesses as much as practicable and in a manner consistent with the Board’s legal obligations to investigate, take appropriate action, and conform to discovery or disclosure requirements. Disclosure of information related to the complaint shall be made only to those with a legitimate need to know.

All records generated as a result of the complaint and appeal processes shall be maintained as confidential to the extent permitted by law. If the investigations finds bullying has occurred, school officials shall take prompt and necessary action up to and including behavioral interventions and support, disciplinary action, and/or 15 referral to law enforcement officials or social services. Consequences shall be unique to the nature of the behavior, the developmental level of the student, and the history of problem behaviors. Remedial measures shall be designed to correct the problem behavior, prevent other occurrences, and protect the victim.

The District shall also take appropriate action against any student or District employee who retaliates against any person who makes a good-faith report of alleged bullying or against any person who testifies, assists, or participates in an investigation or hearing related to such behavior. Employees found to have facilitated or participated in bullying behavior against students or to have been aware that bullying was taking place and failed to report the behavior are considered to be in violation of the prohibition expressed by this policy and may be subject to disciplinary action.

This policy shall be distributed annually to all students enrolled in the School District, parents/guardians, and all District employees. It shall also be distributed to organizations in the community having cooperative agreements with the schools. The District shall provide a copy of the policy to any person upon request. Records shall be maintained on the number and types of reports made, and sanctions imposed for violations of this policy in accordance with established procedures. J. Maps For safety reasons school maps are no longer provided. If you need a school map please contact your Building Principal for checkout procedures.

 

10.

 

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF JANESVILLE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES HANDBOOK: 2017-2018

Updates

1. Guidelines For The Acceptable Use Of Technology By Students And Staff Please refer to Board Policy 6724 and Administrative Regulations 6724.1, 6724.2, and 6724.3 for the complete guidelines for acceptable use of technology.

If a technology device is damaged, School District of Janesville administration reserves the right to charge a student or parent/guardian the full cost for repair or replacement when the damage occurs due to negligence or misuse. Examples of negligence or misuse include, but are not limited to:

1. Leaving technology devices or equipment unattended, or unlocked

2. Lending technology devices or equipment to others

3. Using technology devices or equipment in an unsafe environment

4. Using technology devices or equipment in an unsafe manner

The final determination of costs of repairs or replacement will be determined by the Chief Information Officer.

2. Homeless Students: McKinney-Vento Education For Homless Children And Youth Act Students who lack a fixed, regular or adequate nighttime residence are protected by the McKinney-Vento act. Although eligibility is determined on a case-by-case basis by the homeless liaison, the following situations often qualify.

 Sharing the housing of others due to loss of housing or economic hardship

 Living in a motel, hotel, or campground due to lack of alternative adequate accommodations

 Living in an emergency shelter or transitional living program

 Abandoned in a hospital

 Living in a vehicle or RV, park, public space, abandoned building, substandard housing, bus or train station or other place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping space

 Unaccompanied youth who are not in the physical custody of a parent or guardian, runaways, and youth denied housing by their parents. Students who qualify for McKinney-Vento have the following rights:

 Immediate enrollment: Even without the required documents

 School choice: Students may stay at the school attended when they became homeless or they may enroll in the school in the area where they are currently living.

 Free lunch: For the entire school year

 School fee waivers: When requested by parents and verified by student services staff

 Transportation: If the student is living outside of the attendance area of the school he or she is attending, transportation can be provided.

If you believe that your student may qualify, please contact your school social worker or guidance counselor, the homeless liaison at 743-5070 or the Education for Homeless Children and Youth social worker at 751-7779.

3. Visitors To The School

The administration and staff welcome families, community members and other interested persons who wish to visit schools in our district. However, the administration needs to balance the desires of persons wanting to visit a school with its responsibility to provide an environment which is conducive to learning and protective of the safety and welfare of students and staff. The principal or designee may place restrictions on a visitor to the school or prohibit access to the school if the principal/designee has credible information that the visitor may be a threat to the safety of students or staff or as required by law or court order.

Registered sex offenders who wish to visit schools including parent/legal guardians must submit a Sex Offender Notification form to the Office of Administrative and Human Services at the Educational Services Center, obtain approval, and follow the procedures as required by that office.

The principal or designee may order removal of persons who the principal/designee believes are: disturbing the school’s educational programs, on school premises for the purpose of committing an illegal act; and/or making threats or engaging in other intimidating acts. The principal may order the removal of persons who do not report to the school office, identify themselves, state the purpose for entry upon school property or who enter school property for improper reasons. The principal/designee will contact local law enforcement authorities if necessary. Please refer to Board Policy 1240 and Administrative Regulation 1240.1 for the complete policy and regulations on visitors to our schools.

4. WEATHER – “Inclement Weather/School Closing Information Renamed “School Delay/Closing Information” (For Weather, Mechanical, Safety Or Other Reasons) Should it become necessary to delay the start of school or to cancel school, the School District of Janesville will use the Infinite Campus Messenger system as our primary means of notification to parents and guardians. These messages are sent as a Priority message. We urge parents/guardians to make sure their contact information is always current and correct in the system. In order to keep district telephone lines open for general operations, please do not call the district or your school for closing information/confirmation.

In addition to using directing messaging to parents and guardians through Infinite Campus Messenger, the School District of Janesville utilizes many other forms of public communications to post or announce closing and delays, including: WCLO AM 1230 radio and other local radio stations; the Janesville Gazette; local and regional television stations; the School District of Janesville Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/SDJK12/); and the district website (https://www.janesville.k12.wi.us). If the closing and delay information is related to inclement weather, the district will communicate to the public the night before (if possible) or no later than 6:00am on the day of the closing or delay.

Decisions to delay or cancel school due to inclement weather are made in coordination with both the Janesville Transit System and the Van Galder Bus Company. They are also based on the passage of city streets, safety of rural students and information from the county highway department and city street department. The School District of Janesville also consults with a meteorologist and a team of District staff and area Superintendents before the decision is made.

The final decision to delay or close rests with the Superintendent. If school is not cancelled and families do not feel it is safe for their child to come to school, it is their prerogative to keep their student(s) home. Families choosing to keep students home will need to call the student’s school(s) to report their absences(s), which will be considered a principal excused absence.

The School District of Janesville does not close early in an attempt to avoid incoming snow or ice storms. This is to protect children who may get home before their families and have no home access or supervision. If a parent/guardian is concerned about incoming weather, they may come to the school to have their child released early, which will be considered a principal excused absence.

If schools are closed for weather related reason, be aware that all Preschool 4 Janesville (P4J) programs located in School District of Janesville Public Schools will also be closed. Should a decision be made to delay the start of school as opposed to closing, the School District of Janesville Public schools with P4J morning programs will be cancelled, but they will hold their afternoon sessions as regularly scheduled. If your child attends P4J at a private school location 18 or community child care center, be sure to contact your P4J site coordinator to confirm any closings or delays.

Cancellation of Athletic or Extracurricular Events: There will be no athletic contests and no practices on days school is called off for weather reasons. The gyms will also be closed to the public on those days. On days when school is in session but weather has progressively worsened, cancellations for after school or evening athletics or extracurricular activities will be announced by 2:00 p.m. on WCLO radio that day and posted on the School District of Janesville Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/SDJK12/) and on the district website (https://www.janesville.k12.wi.us).

The School District of Janesville calendar has several days built in to accommodate weather delays/closures. However, should the district exceed those buffer days, state law requires the School District of Janesville to make-up days to meet the minimum number of hours of direct public instruction (http://dpi.wi.gov/cal/days-hours).

5. Appendix A: Middle/High School Student Conduct Code - Revised March 2017

6. Appendix B: School Nutrition Meal Charge Policy APPENDIX A: INTRODUCTION The School District of Janesville believes that:

 Learning cannot take place without a safe and orderly environment.

 Every student has the right to attend school without fear of harm, physical threats, or verbal abuse.

 It is the responsibility of each school in the District to create and maintain a safe and orderly environment.

 High expectations for student behavior must be the standard throughout our schools.

 Parents, students, and teachers must work together to promote responsible behavior; effective communication between the schools, the students and parents is the best way to foster positive student behavior.

 The School District of Janesville does not discriminate against students on the basis of sex, race, religion, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, parental or marital status, sexual orientation, or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability.

The Student Conduct Code gives the rules and regulations that will help schools reach these goals. Students are expected to abide by any and all established codes of conduct, board policies, conduct/behavior as outlined by the student handbook and as stated in rules established by building principals for each school. DISCIPLINARY DEFINITIONS AND PROCEDURES Students who violate the rules and regulations set forth in this manual are subject to one or more of the disciplinary actions described below.

Conference A meeting with school staff. Detention Requiring a student to remain at school beyond the normal school day or at lunch.

*In-School The temporary removal of a Suspension student from his/her regular classroom to another supervised learning area for one to five days.

*Out-of-School The removal of a student Suspension from school and school grounds for one to five days.

*Pre-Expulsion The purpose of this Conference conference will be to convey to the student and parents that this is the last stop before the Board of Education. The conference will be documented with a letter to the parent/guardians from the person holding the conference. If an expulsion ultimately occurs, this letter will be used as part of the documentation.

*Expulsion Recommendation: The removal of a student from school and school grounds for a time to be determined by the Board of Education.

Mandatory Reporting of Student’s Misconduct to Rock County Department of Human Services (RCHS) The School District is required by state law to report incidents of sexual assault to the Department of Human Services. Reporting of Student Misconduct to Police Department The Police Department will be contacted by the School District regarding certain incidents. Parents will be notified of these disciplinary actions in a timely fashion.

 

11.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENT CONDUCT CODE Revised 3/17

1 For certain single conduct violations, the maximum consequence will be immediately applied. BATTERY According to Wisconsin State Law, Battery is: “Causing “bodily harm to another by an act done with intent to cause bodily harm to that person or another without the consent of the person so harmed.” This includes acts by individuals, gangs, or threat groups. Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference         

 Detention           

 Parent Contact         

 Police Referral         

 Probation Referral         

 In School Suspension             

 Out of School Suspension         

  Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:   

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

DRUGS, ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND LOOK-ALIKE DRUGS

Possession, use, distribution, or sale of drugs, alcohol, tobacco, look-alike drugs or drug paraphernalia is prohibited on school premises before, during, or after school, or at any school sponsored activity.

According to Wisconsin State Law, drug/alcohol is defined as: “Any fermented malt beverage or intoxicating liquor, any controlled substance, counterfeit substance, or look-alike substance.” According to Board Policy 5234, a student who shows a continuing problem or is suspected of being under the influence of drugs or intoxicants will be referred to the designated administrator or to guidance, health, or other trained staff for assessment.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Confiscate the drug, alcohol, tobacco or look-alike drug

 Contact Network Team

 Assessment

 Educational Program

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

ELECTRONIC DEVICES

Authorized electronic devices may be used with Administrator approval; however, they are prohibited in locker rooms and restrooms unless powered off in accordance with State Statute 175.22.

Unauthorized electronic devices are prohibited on school premises. Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Confiscation

 Detention

 Parent Referral/Contact

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Removal from premises Maximum Consequences:

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion

 Recommendation for Expulsion FALSE ALARMS/BOMB THREATS Initiating a false fire alarm or initiating a false report warning of a weapon, fire or an impending bombing or catastrophe. Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence: Recommendation for Expulsion

 

FORGERY/CHEATING/ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Forgery/Cheating/Academic Dishonesty includes: - Falsely using the name of another person. - Falsifying times, dates, grades, addresses, or other data on school forms. - Claiming or using the work or answers of another student or source as one’s own. - Plagiarizing (using the ideas of someone else as one’s own ideas without acknowledging the source). - Copying or stealing another person’s work. - Allowing another person to copy one’s work. - Doing another person’s class work. - Intentionally accessing another person’s work to use it as one’s own. - Disseminating a copy of another person’s work. - Downloading information from online sources and representing it as one’s own work. - Giving or receiving unauthorized assistance on exams. - Altering grades or other academic records. - Submitting identical work in more than one course without the prior approval of the instructor.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Loss of Grade/Grade Adjustment

 Conference

 Verbal Warning

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

HARASSMENT/DISCRIMINATORY ACTS

Promoting negative stereotyping that degrades or flagrantly demeans any individual or group by negatively referring to the religion, socio-economic status, race, sex, national origin, creed, ancestry, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy, or physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability of the individual or group. Also, disturbing an individual or group by name calling, pestering, or threatening.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 Educational Program

 Counseling

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

INAPPROPRIATE CLOTHING/ATTIRE

Clothing/attire is considered inappropriate if it is offensive or disruptive to the school environment as determined by staff/administration.

Inappropriate clothing includes, but is not limited to:

- alcohol or drug-related clothing/jewelry

- threat/hate group or gang-related clothing

- clothes that contain a message that is discriminatory

- clothing or attire that causes a distraction or is embarrassing to others

- clothes that contain a negative message about any aspect of race, religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, ancestry, creed, pregnancy or physical, mental, emotional or learning disabilities

- hats may not be worn in the building

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Required to modify his/her attire

 Parent Contact Maximum Consequences:

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 

INAPPROPRIATE LANGUAGE

Conduct, gestures, written or spoken language that is obscene, lewd, profane, vulgar, sexual, libelous, slanderous, or suggestive. “Swear words” are an example of inappropriate language.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference.

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

INAPPROPRIATE USE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT, NETWORKS AND SERVICES

Includes but is not limited to:

- sending or displaying offensive messages or pictures

- using obscene language - harassing, insulting or attacking others

- loading software on district owned computers

- damaging computers, computer systems or computer networks

- violating copyright laws - using others’ passwords

- trespassing in others’ files or work

- intentionally wasting limited resources

- using the network for commercial or for profitable purposes

- using the network for personal, religious, political or private business

- using the network to access pornographic or other inappropriate materials

- portraying themselves on personal Internet Home Page as representatives of the School District of Janesville or an individual school

- copying or using someone else’s work without their permission

- using the district’s network to access or download music for personal use

Consequences: Students who commit any of the above listed acts of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Parent Contact

 Denied access to telecommunications equipment, networks and services

 Banned from bringing any software or data disks into school

 Required to pay for all property damage

 The Internet service provider will be notified

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension Maximum Consequences:

 Denied access to all district owned computer equipment, networks and services

 Appropriate law enforcement agencies will be notified

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

PHYSICAL ATTACK ON STAFF MEMBER

Intentionally pushing or striking a School District staff member. Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

REPEATED CLASSROOM DISRUPTION/CHRONIC DISRUPTION OR VIOLATION OF SCHOOL RULES

Repeatedly engaging in conduct on school premises before, during or after school or while under the supervision of a school authority that disrupts the ability of school authorities to maintain order or an educational atmosphere at school, in the classroom, or at an activity supervised by a school authority.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion

Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

REPEATED TARDINESS

Being late to school, class, or any other part of the student’s scheduled school day. Tardy for middle/high school students is up to 5 minutes late for that class period.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Verbal Warning

 Parent Contact

 Detention Maximum Consequences:

 In School Suspension

 Referral to Interagency Attendance Committee

 

SAFETY VIOLATIONS/FIGHTING

Conduct or behavior which endangers the physical health or safety of any student or school employee on school premises before, during, or after school or at any school-sponsored activity.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Verbal Warning

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Removal from the course

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion

 Parking Permit Revoked

Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

SEXUAL ASSAULT

Sexual Assault is any act prohibited by Wisconsin Statutes, which includes “sexual contact” or “sexual intercourse” and is without the consent of the person with whom sexual contact or intercourse occurs. These terms have specific definitions in Wisconsin Statute.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 The School District, as required by law, will report all incidents of sexual assault to the Rock County Department of Human Services.

 The incident will be reported to district personnel.

 The Police Department may be contacted regarding the incident.

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

THEFT

Intentionally taking or concealing the property of another person without the person’s consent.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Verbal Warning

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Payment for any damage to or loss of the property

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Police Referral

 Pre-Expulsion

 Probation Referral Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

THREATS OR INTIMIDATING ACTS Threatening the well-being, health, or safety of an individual by verbal remarks, bullying or gestures. Also, extorting or attempting to extort money or anything of value from a person on school premises before, during, or after school or at any school sponsored activity.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

TRUANCY

Unauthorized absence from school during any portion of the student’s scheduled day.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Truancy Abatement Center

 Parking Permit Revoked

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequences:

 Lack of progress leading to failure

 Retention in the course

 Repetition of the course

 Referral to Interagency Attendance Committee for possible court action

VANDALISM/GRAFFITI

Intentional damage or defacing of property belonging to the school or others.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Payment for any damage to or loss of the property

 Detention

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension.

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion

 Clean, repair damaged or defaced property Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

VERBAL ATTACK ON STAFF MEMBER

Threatening the well-being, health, or safety of any staff member with words or gestures.

Consequences: Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 In School Suspension  Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

WEAPONS

Possession or use of a weapon (defined below) on school premises before, during, or after school or at any school sponsored activity is prohibited.

Prohibited Weapons:

1. Articles designed or commonly used to intimidate and/or inflict bodily harm on other persons. This category of weapons includes, but is not limited to: firearms (loaded and unloaded), BB guns, pellet guns, look-alike weapons, toy guns, knuckles, razors, switch blades, and any other types of knives, chains, clubs or stars.

2. Articles designed for other purposes but used or intended to be used to intimidate and/or inflict bodily harm on other persons. This category includes, but is not limited to: belts, combs, jewelry, pencils, files, compasses, aerosol sprays, or scissors.

Search for Weapons: In accordance with School Board policy, school personnel may search desks, school lockers, as well as book bags, gym bags, coats or jackets, or other personal property a student may bring onto school grounds or into a school building. Please refer to Board Policy 5270 and the related Administrative Regulations for the complete policy on Student Searches and Seizures.

Weapons Not Prohibited: This includes all normally prohibited weapons that a student may bring to school for an authorized curricular use. Such weapons must be approved in advance by the teacher in whose class the weapon will be shown and by the building administration.

Consequences: Consequences for possessing or using a weapon on school premises before, during, or after school, or at any school-sponsored activity are severe. Students who commit this act of misconduct will be disciplined in one or more of the following ways:

 Confiscate the weapon

 Conference

 Detention

 Parent Contact

 Police Referral

 Probation Referral

 In School Suspension

 Out of School Suspension

 Pre-Expulsion Maximum Consequence:

 Recommendation for Expulsion

 

12.

 

POLICY OF THE JANESVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT ON YOUTH GANGS

The School District of Janesville recognizes that a school must create and maintain a safe and orderly environment in which learning can take place. The presence of gangs, gang affiliations and gang-related activities within a school disrupts the learning environment by threatening the safety of students, staff, and parents in the school building and causing disruption to and interference with the academic process. The School District of Janesville bars all gangs, gang affiliations and gang-related activities from school buildings, school property, and school-related activities at all times.

APPENDIX B:

Web address: http://janesville.k12.wi.us/sdj 527 S. Franklin St.

• Janesville, WI 53548 (608) 743-5132

• FAX (608) 743-5134

Educational Services Center School Nutrition SDJ School Nutrition Meal Charge Policy Because all students in participating schools may receive reimbursable school meals, all School Food Authorities must have a policy in place for children who are participating at the reduced price or paid rate, but either do not have money in their account or in hand to cover the cost of the meal at the time of service. Such a policy ensures that school food service professionals, school administrators, families, and students have a shared understanding of expectations in these situations.

If a student account balance is negative a daily reminder call to the parent / guardian will be placed asking for payment. Low balance reminder calls will begin when a student account is under $5.00 for a full pay student and under $2.00 for a reduced price student. These low balance reminder calls are sent on Mondays and Thursdays. Elementary students will not be refused a meal.

When an account is negative, an additional call will be made from the School Nutrition office or the Principal’s office until we contact a parent / guardian and determine how and when payment will be made. If payment cannot be made, School Nutrition will notify the parent to send a lunch to school with their child as their account will be suspended until payment arrangements can be made.

The parent / guardian will be asked if they would like to apply for free or reduced price meals. Middle School and High School students must have either funds available in their account or cash to purchase foods they select for lunch. If the student does not have funds available, they must seek out the Kitchen Manager for approval to purchase a meal on credit.

All credit purchases must be paid by the following school day. If a student does not have funds or the ability to make a payment they can select an alternate meal (peanut butter and jelly sandwich, fruit, and milk) at no charge. The student may request a cheese sandwich if allergic to peanuts.

Alternate meals are available on two successive days for students. Middle School and High School students will be asked to contact their parent / guardian by the Kitchen Manager when they ask for approval to receive a meal on credit. Parents will be contacted by texted message or phone call from their child’s phone, or a written reminder that their child’s lunch account requires payment will be sent home with student.

If a parent cannot pay they must make payment arrangements with the Kitchen Manager or School Nutrition office at the Educational Services Center or the child’s account will be suspended. The parent / guardian will be asked if they would like to apply for free or reduced price meals. Charging by adults and all district personnel is not allowed at any time. “This Institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co- Curricular Code (Athletic / Club Participation Grades 9-12

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF JANESVILLE 2018-2019 CO-CURRICULAR CODE (Athletics and Clubs Participation Code) Grades 9-12

Printable PDF of the Co-Curricular Code
 

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF JANESVILLE Co-Curricular Code for Grades 9-12 (Athletics and Club Participation Code) INTRODUCTION This code will be administered in conjunction with current Board Policy 5234 and Administrative Regulations (5234.1 & 5234.2) regarding regular school attendance and drug and alcohol use/abuse policies.

The School District of Janesville has established both academic standards and standards of behavior that apply to all students. As part of the educational process, each program will focus on standards relating to, but not limited to, appropriate conduct, citizenship and healthy lifestyle. Standards can only be effective if they represent what parents, employers, educators, community members and students believe are important and are possible to achieve. These standards will only be learned when they are continually reinforced through instruction received in all school programs, including co-curricular activities, and in the home.

High personal standards of conduct, citizenship and healthy lifestyles are examples of responsible behavior that best serve succeeding generations. Therefore, by signing this four-year binding, 12-month-code, students accept the responsibility to match the privilege of participation with an equal measure of responsible personal behavior.

Participation in any organized co-curricular program is an earned privilege that carries expectations and responsibilities that exceed the norm of regular school attendance. Students who elect to participate are expected to model behaviors that will reflect positively on their school and the community of Janesville. All non WIAA co-curricular activities, which includes school clubs, will be divided into seasons coinciding with fall, winter and spring athletic seasons as defined by the WIAA.

Each coach, faculty advisor, new student and at least one parent or guardian must confirm they have read and agreed to the code prior to their first activity. The purpose of the reading and review of the code is to promote better understanding of the code and the co-curricular programs of the district. Each participant and his/her parent or guardian must agree to the co-curricular rules and regulations. Participants will be required to re-sign their code card from previous years. With their agreement, participants and parents agree to adhere to this code.

The responsibility for administering this code rests with the building administrator or designee.

3 STATEMENT OF RISK: All co-curricular activities involve some risk. Consequently, participants in any co-curricular activity may be at risk for serious injuries. The School District of Janesville and the Board of Education endeavor to operate co-curricular activities in a safe manner; however, it is impossible to eliminate the risk of injury while participating in a co-curricular activity. Parents, Guardians and student-athletes should consider these risks carefully before deciding to participate in any co-curricular activity

I. INITIAL ELIGIBILITY

A. The Co-Curricular Code Agreement must be signed by the student and the student’s parent or legal guardian stating that each has read and understood the code prior to the 7th day of practice or participation.

B. ATHLETES ONLY: A student may not participate in athletic activities until the following are on file in the high school Athletic Director's office:

  1. Written permission of a parent or legal guardian to participate in school athletics.
  2. An appropriate physical examination card. The Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association requires a physical examination for one or two years based on the following criteria: (1) Examination taken after April 1 is good for the following TWO SCHOOL YEARS; (2) Examination taken before April 1st is good for the remainder of that SCHOOL YEAR and the following SCHOOL YEAR. Alternate year cards will be used the second year for students who received a two-year examination. Physical examination cards of new enrollees are eligible to be transferred based on the criteria above.
  3. The student athlete permission for medical treatment card (red).
  4. Athletes must have the SDJ Concussion Agreement signed yearly by the athlete and a parent or guardian. C. AGE: (Student Athletes Only) A student athlete must be under nineteen (19) years of age on August 1, which precedes the start of the school year. D.

ACADEMICS

  1. A student receiving one or more failing grade(s), including one or more incomplete grades, in the latest grade-reporting or academic evaluation period shall be ineligible for competition/performance until receiving no failing grades, but not for less than 5 consecutive scheduled school days and nights. A student may not return to competition until the day following the 5-day ineligibility period. If applicable, when the earliest allowed W.I.A.A. game/meet takes place before the first day of classes, the ineligibility period shall be 7 consecutive calendar days beginning with the earliest allowed competition in that sport. 5
  2. A student receiving more than one failing grade in the latest grade-reporting or academic evaluation period shall be ineligible for interscholastic competition/performance until receiving no failing grades, but not for less than 15 consecutive scheduled school days and nights. A student may not return to competition/performance until the school day following the 15-day ineligibility period. When the earliest allowed W.I.A.A. game/meet is before the first day of classes, the ineligibility period shall be the lesser of: (1) 21 consecutive calendar days beginning with the date of earliest allowed competition/performance or (2) onethird of the maximum number of competitions allowed in that sport (rounded up if one-third results in a fraction).
  3. There will be an interim (mid-quarter) grade report each quarter. Students receiving more than one failing grade on a mid-term grade report will be ineligible for interscholastic competition/performance for the week (Monday through Saturday) following the grade report. Grade reports and ineligibility will continue until the student athlete receives no more than one failing grade.
  4. The ineligibility shall begin on the first scheduled school day following the grade posting date after they have received the final grade report, and communicated to all coaches and advisors.
  5. Students must participate in all team/activity meetings and practices during the ineligibility period. However, an academically or personal conduct ineligible student cannot leave school early to accompany his/her team to an athletic contest.
  6. A student identified as a student with disabilities (SWD) who does not receive standard ABC grades, may be eligible if he/she is making satisfactory progress in his/her total school program as indicated by his/her IEP.
  7. A student may erase ineligibility status related to the last grade-reporting period through summer school courses (including correspondence and virtual courses) at the same or some other school, provided:
  • The student’s school gives credit toward graduation requirements for such courses and counts them in rank-in-class standings, and
  • The student successfully completes not less than the same number of courses which caused ineligibility. E.

ATTENDANCE

1. All Participants

  • A student must be carried on the attendance rolls (for purposes of state aid) as a student in grades 9-12 in his/her school. 
  • No student may practice or play in any competition, contest, etc. unless he/she attended all classes from 11:30 a.m. until the end of the school day of the scheduled contest or unless excused by an administrator. (PARENT EXCUSED ABSCENCES DO NOT WAIVE THIS REQUIREMENT)
  • Any student who is considered truant for any part of the scheduled school day may not practice or compete in any co-curricular activity on that day.

2. Student Athletes Only

  • A student is eligible only during the first eight semesters of enrollment upon reaching grade 9 and only during the first six semesters of enrollment upon reaching grade 10.
  • A student must complete eligibility within four school years upon reaching grade 9 and within three school years upon reaching grade 10.
  • A student may not participate in a sport in more than four different seasons.
  • A student must discontinue summertime participation in non-school programs prior to the first day of the school's official opening day of practice in the same sport.
  • A student must be enrolled in his/her seventh and eighth semesters consecutively.
  • A student must be enrolled in a school by the 17th school day of a semester to be eligible during that semester.
  • A student cannot become an athlete in a school other than the one in which he/she is carried on the attendance rolls or has completed the SDJ Home School application process. II.

INJURIES

  •  All injuries must be reported immediately to the coach/advisor in charge of the co-curricular activity.
  • An injury report must be filed promptly in the office of the Building Athletic Director. If insurance benefits are to be claimed, a report must be turned in to the School District of Janesville Human Resources office.
  • Students requiring medical attention must obtain a written release from a health care provider before returning to practice, competition, contests or performance 
  • Student Athletes and Parents must follow the School District of Janesville concussion management plan. III.

CARE OF EQUIPMENT (Student)

  • It is the responsibility of the student/parent, for the proper care and safekeeping of the equipment issued. Lockers must be secured before and after practice.
  • Fees for equipment will be added to the student’s individual Infinite Campus account. Any missing equipment issued must be paid for by the student or parent, either to the school bookkeeper or fee collectors, prior to competing in another activity. C. School equipment is to be used only for school-related activities. IV. LOCKER AND TRAINING ROOMS (Student Athletes Only) A. The locker room is for players and coaches only. B. No "horseplay" shall be permitted in training rooms or locker rooms at any time.
  • Training rooms and locker rooms are to be kept clean.
  • Training room facilities are to be used only under the direction and supervision of a coach.
  • No person may use a cell phone or other device to capture, record, or transfer a representation of a nude or partially nude person in the locker room.
  • Students shall secure all items in a locked locker. The SDJ is not responsible for lost or stolen items V.

PRACTICE, COMPETITION, CONTEST, ETC. ATTENDANCE

All students are expected to attend all practices and activities unless excused by the head coach or advisor.

VI. TRAVEL AND CONDUCT ON TRIPS

  • A. Participants must use the mode of transportation designated by the school to and from the site of the activity or practice. A parent or legal guardian may request an exemption to take his/her student home in his/her private vehicle. This request must be made in person and through written permission. Building Athletic Director, Building Principal & Coaches/Advisors will have final approval of all requests.
  • B. School transportation will leave at predesignated times.
  • C. Coaches and advisors may exercise their discretion with respect to 
  1. The degree of talking or singing permitted on the way to or from a contest or practice.
  2. The consumption of food or drink.
  3. Dress.
  4. CELL PHONE USE

D. All students shall conduct themselves in such a way as to reflect positively on themselves, their family and the school.

E. Students shall be responsible for the cleanliness of all areas used during the event in which food or drink is consumed.

VII. DROPPING OR CHANGING SPORTS (Student Athletes Only)

Before an athlete may change from one sport to another having the same or overlapping seasons, the agreement of the Building Principal and receiving coach must be obtained. Such agreement must also be obtained if the athlete is cut from one sport for disciplinary reasons and wishes to change to another sport. All equipment from the prior sport must be returned before being cleared for athlete’s next sport participation.

VIII. PERSONAL CONDUCT

Penalties for athletes who violate the code must be served in the current or next athletic season in which the athlete participates. Penalties for students participating in non-WIAA activities must be served in all activities of that season.

All non WIAA co-curricular activities, which includes school clubs, will be divided into seasons coinciding with fall, winter and spring athletic seasons as defined by the WIAA for all co-curricular activities (competitions, events, performances, meets) will be made available after August 1 for the upcoming school year.

The following types of conduct are determined to be violations of this Co-Curricular Code. Students serving a suspension for a code violation will not be allowed to join a sport or other co-curricular activity after the date of the first practice.

Violations of the Co-Curricular Code shall be cumulative throughout the student's grade 9-12 enrollment. However, if a calendar year elapses after a violation (measured from 9 the date on which the conduct constituting the violation occurred) without an additional violation, the violation shall not be counted for purposes of assessing any penalty for any subsequent violation. Only one violation during the student's grade 9-12 enrollment may be discounted pursuant to this paragraph.

An accumulation of a total of 4 Class III and Class IV violations in any combination will result in a suspension from all activities for one calendar year.

If a co-curricular activity does not compete, perform, or provide service opportunities, penalties for violation of this code will be applied towards meetings.

Penalties for code violations that carry over from one season to the next must be served in the same category as those in which the student began to serve the penalties. The penalty imposed for a Class I, a Class II, or a Class III violation may, in the discretion of the building administrator, be delayed as to the student’s participation in performances of a play or musical production if the student committing the violation holds a role critical to the production of that play or musical production (such as a lead role in a musical) and the determination of the violation occurs within three weeks before the first performance of the play or musical production. The delay may apply to multiple performances of the same play or musical production. In the event such a delay is applied to a student, that student shall not be eligible to participate in the next major play or musical production.

Any student having a personal conduct code violation will forfeit the privilege of having their name submitted for any special awards or honors during the season in which the code violation was committed and/or served.

CLASS I VIOLATION

A student arrested and/or charged for a violation(s) of the criminal state statutes as determined extremely serious by the Superintendent, Director of Administrative and Human Services, Building Administrator or Building Athletic Director will be assessed a Class I violation. The penalty for this violation is the loss of co-curricular activity eligibility for the remainder of that student’s co-curricular activity career. The student is eligible to apply for re-instatement after 1 year through the co-curricular code appeal process, provided the student has completed 100 hours of community service.  

CLASS II VIOLATION

The following acts are considered serious. The penalty for such violations will be a loss of eligibility for one calendar year from the date of violation. The student may practice with the team during the season in which he/she will regain eligibility. In addition, violators will be required to perform 50 hours of community service during the year of ineligibility, assigned and monitored by the Building Athletic Director.

  1. Hosting gatherings where drinking of alcoholic beverages or use of controlled substances takes place.
  2. Selling or distributing alcohol or controlled substances.
  3. Failure of any parent, legal guardian or student to notify the building’s Athletic Director of a police-documented violation involving that student within 7 calendar days of the violation.

If the violation involves drugs or alcohol, a student can have the contest suspension reduced to the equivalent of a Class III second violation by completing the school district's ATODA education program. The student must complete both the education program and 50 hours of community service before regaining eligibility.

CLASS III VIOLATIONS

  1. Conduct in violation of criminal state statutes other than Class I. Severity of conduct may cause offense to be considered as a Class II violation, as determined by the Superintendent, Director of Student Services, Director of Administrative and Human Services or Building Athletic Director.
  2. Possession, consumption, or use of alcohol or controlled substances.
  3. Physical possession or use of tobacco, including any form of E-cigarettes and full compliance of Board Policy 3645: The School District of Janesville wishes to provide a safe and healthy environment for all persons. For purposes of this policy, “tobacco use’ means to chew or maintain any substance containing tobacco, including smokeless tobacco, in the mouth to derive the effects of tobacco, as well as all uses of tobacco, including cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, chewing tobacco, snuff, any other matter or substances that contain tobacco, in addition to papers used to roll cigarettes and/or the smoking of electronic, “vapor,” or other substitute forms of cigarettes. Clove cigarettes and any other lighted smoking devices for burning tobacco or any other substance. Therefore, the use of any tobacco products shall be prohibited in all school district buildings, on school district grounds, and in school district vehicles. Notices to this effect will be posted.
  4. Non-prescribed use of anabolic steroids or human growth hormones.

PENALTIES FOR CLASS III VIOLATIONS: (IN-ACTIVITY AND OUT-OFACTIVITY)

1. Class III Violation (First)

  • Suspension for 25% of the number of scheduled contests, competitions, performances, activities, or service opportunities in the current activity, or the next activity. (.5 or greater is rounded up: minimum of one activity) The student must also perform 5 hours of community service during the suspension, which will be monitored by the Building Athletic Director to regain eligibility.
  • If the number of contests, competitions, etc., remaining in the current activity season is less than the number set forth above, the student shall serve the remainder of the suspension during the next sport/activity in which he/she participates. The length of the suspension will be determined by subtracting from 25% the percentage of contests for which the student was suspended, and taking the remaining percentage of the next season’s contests.
  • The student must participate with the group in all practices during the suspension.

2. Class III Violation (Second)

Suspension for the remainder of the current activity in which the student is participating plus one-third of the total number of scheduled contests, competitions, etc. in the next activity in which the student participates. The student must also perform 10 hours of community service during the suspension, which will be assigned and monitored by the Building Athletic Director to regain eligibility.

The student will participate in practice during the remainder of the current activity while under suspension unless the coach/advisor decides otherwise.

The student must participate in practice with the group while suspended for onethird of the total scheduled contests, competitions, etc. in the next activity.

3. Class III Violation (Third and Subsequent)

a. Suspension from all activities for one calendar year commencing on the date the student is notified of a confirmed violation. The student must also perform 15 12 hours of community service during the suspension, which will be assigned and monitored by the Building Athletic Director to regain eligibility.

b. If the calendar year expires during an activity season in which a student desires to participate, the student must participate with the group in practice during that entire season.

E. CLASS IV VIOLATIONS

1. Presence at a gathering where alcohol or drugs are being consumed by persons under the age of 21.

2. Non-prescribed use of creatine/non-prescribed use of anabolic steroids or human growth hormones

With respect to subsection (1), a student shall not be considered in violation if he/she can demonstrate by convincing information that he/she was not aware that alcohol or controlled substances were present or that after becoming aware that alcohol or controlled substances were present, the student disassociated himself/herself from and left the gathering. If a person(s) in possession of alcohol or controlled substance arrives at a gathering being given by a student, that student is responsible under this policy for the immediate removal of that person(s) and of all alcohol or controlled substances from the premises. A responsible adult or the police should be contacted without delay if that person(s) refuses to leave.

F. PENALTIES FOR CLASS IV VIOLATIONS: (IN-ACTIVITY AND OUT-OFACTIVITY)

1. Class IV Violation (First)

  • Suspension from the next (1) contest, competition, or performance all activities for that current season. In the event the current season has concluded the suspension will occur in the next season in which the student participates.

2. Class IV Violation (Second)

  • Suspension for 25% of contests, competitions, etc. in the current activity (or in the next activity, if the current activity has been concluded.)
  • The student must participate with the group in all practices during the suspension.

3. Class IV Violation (Third) 13

  • Suspension for 33% of contests, competitions, etc. in the current activity (or in the next activity, if the current activity has been concluded). The student must also perform 10 hours of community service during the suspension, which will be assigned and monitored by the Building Athletic Director or desigignee to regain eligibility.
  • The student must participate with the group in all practices/meetings during the suspension. With respect to subsections 2 and 3, penalties for Class IV Violations, if the number of contests, competitions, etc. remaining in the current activity is less than the number of dates suspended, the student shall remain suspended during the next activity until the entire suspension has been served.

4. Class IV Violation (Fourth and Subsequent)

Suspension from all activities for 1 calendar year commencing on the date the student is notified of a confirmed violation. The student must also perform 15 hours of community service during the suspension, which will be assigned and monitored by the Building Athletic Director to regain eligibility. If the calendar year expires during an activity season in which a student desires to participate, the student must participate with the team in practice during that entire season.

Athletics Chart of Ineligibility                                                                                                Suspension

Total Number of Season Contests/ / Events 25% 50% 75%
1 1 1 1
2 1 1 2
3 1 2 2
4 1 2 3
5 1 3 4
6 2 3 5
7 2 4 5
8 2 4 6
9 2 5 7
10 3 5 8
11 3 6 8
12 3 6 9
13 3 7 10
14 4 7 11
15 4 8 11
16 4 8 12
17 4 9 13
18 5 9 14
19 5 10 14
20 5 10 15
21 5 11 16
22 6 11 17
23 6 12 17
24 6 12 18
25 6 13 19
26 7 13 20

*This cart is intended for calculating a normal suspension period.

G. SUSPENSION DURING ACADEMIC INELIGIBILITY

The penalty for the academic ineligibility shall be served first. The student will serve their behavior code suspension when he/she gains academic eligibility.

H. CONDUCT INVOLVING DRUGS OR ALCOHOL

Any student who has been determined to have committed a violation of the Co-Curricular Code involving use, possession, buying or selling of any drug or alcohol shall be required to participate in a district-approved ATODA education program at the expense of the student or his/her parent or legal guardian. The student must enroll in the next available course offered by the school district and attend all classes until completion. If a student is absent from a class:

1. The student may be immediately dropped from the class.

2. The student must re-enroll in a class, start again from the beginning, and be required to pay the full class fee again.

3. The student becomes immediately ineligible to participate in co-curricular activities until successful completion of the course.

If a student is enrolled in the program and has served the required number of games for the suspension, he/she may regain eligibility by continuing perfect attendance in the program. However, the student is not excused from attending the program to participate in a co-curricular activity.

Failure to complete the program shall cause the student to remain suspended from participation in co-curricular activities, forfeit eligibility for conference or state awards, and prohibit attendance at any awards banquet or ceremony. The course instructor will notify the building athletic director when the student has successfully completed the course.

IX. VOLUNTARY ADMISSION

Any student who recognizes that he/she has a problem with the use/abuse of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, other controlled substances, or the use of performance enhancers as defined in Class III, 4, is encouraged to seek professional help for this problem. Any student who voluntarily seeks help for drug, tobacco, or alcohol abuse and notifies school administrators that they are seeking/receiving such help shall have all penalties waived under the following conditions:

A. That student is not under investigation for the violation of this code at the time they request the help.

B. The student agrees to participate in and complete, a district-approved ATODA education program offered by the school district. The student must enroll in the next class offered by the district. If the conditions of the voluntary admission procedures are not fulfilled in a timely fashion (21) calendar days from date of notification of violation, the admission will count as a first offense. Waiver of penalties by voluntary admission is limited to one time during a student’s high school career.

X. INVESTIGATION PROCEDURE

The building administrator or designee will make determinations as to whether or not violations of the Co-Curricular Code have been committed.

Any student alleged to have engaged in conduct which is in violation of the CoCurricular Code, will be subject to the following procedures:

  • Prior to being interviewed, the student shall be advised that:
  1. The student may terminate the interview at any time with the consequence that the student's parent or legal guardian shall be contacted and be required to meet with the person conducting the interview, and the student, in order that the interview may be completed.
  2. The student's refusal to answer questions pertaining to his/her violation may be used as a basis for a presumption that the student committed the alleged violation.
  3. The student will be provided with the list of questions.
  • The building administrator or designee may obtain information in regard to alleged violations of the Co-Curricular Code in any reasonable manner including an interview of a student alleged to have committed a violation. Interviews with students alleged to have committed a violation of the Co-Curricular Code shall include a list of questions inquiring as to facts pertinent to the alleged incident. Additional questions may be asked at the discretion of the investigator.
  • A student will be determined to have committed a violation of the Co-Curricular Code if any of the following have occurred:
  1. The student admits the conduct constituting a violation.
  2. The building administrator or designee obtains information, which in his/her judgment is clear and convincing evidence that the student engaged in conduct constituting a violation.

XI. NOTIFICATION OF VIOLATION AND PENALTIES

After determining that a student has committed a code violation, the building administrator or designee shall prepare a letter addressed to the student, the student's parent or legal guardian, the student's coach/advisor, building principal, and athletic director describing the violation and summarizing the penalty to be assessed, penalties which may be assessed for subsequent violations and the procedure for appeal of the determination. The building administrator or designee shall meet with the student and deliver the student's copy of the letter during the meeting. A copy of the letter shall be mailed to the student's parent or legal guardian and a copy delivered to the student's coach/advisor. The student immediately becomes ineligible for participation upon notification of the administrator’s determination of a code violation.

XII. APPEAL PROCEDURE

 A student or the student's parent or legal guardian may appeal the determination of the building administrator or designee that a violation of the Co-Curricular Code has occurred by delivering a written notice of intent to appeal to the office of the building administrator by 3:00 p.m. on the third school day subsequent to receipt by the student of written notice of the violation as required in Article XI. The building Athletic Director will schedule the appeal hearing to be held as soon as practical. The appeal shall be heard by a board of three members consisting of:

  1. Two (2) Educational Services Center Representatives appointed by the Superintendent
  2. A community member who has received training on the code and does not currently have a child in high school. In the event the violation requires use of information which may not lawfully be disclosed to persons other than school district personnel, a third administrator as designated by the superintendent.

The Superintendent’s designee shall chair the appeal board and the ruling of a majority of the board shall prevail. The ruling shall be confirmed by letter to the student, the student's parent or legal guardian, building administrator.

At the appeal hearing, the building administrator or designee shall be provided with an opportunity to describe the evidence which forms the basis for the determination that a code violation was committed. The student and the student's parent or legal guardian shall be provided with an opportunity to explain the basis for the appeal. Each side will be provided with an opportunity to rebut the position of the other. If, at the appeal hearing, new information is provided which was not available to the building administrator before the violation was determined the building administrator will be given an opportunity to state whether he/she wishes to change the determination. The appeal board shall affirm the determination of the building administrator unless the 18 appeal board determines that: (1) the determination of the building administrator is not reasonably based upon the available evidence, or (2) the procedure according to which the determination was made was fundamentally unfair to the student or the student's parent or guardian.

Multiple meetings may be held as needed during the appeal process to clarify facts and provide due process. After the initial hearing, additional meetings can be scheduled by the Superintendent or Building Athletic Director only if new information regarding the violation becomes available. The decision of the appeal board in respect to the appeal shall be final.

 

Effective: 2018-2019 School Year

Revisions: 2017, 2018